POPs in the news

04/12/2020 -

In the weeks before the coronavirus began tearing through California, the city of Commerce made an expensive decision: It shut down part of its water supply. More:

Human Exposure

Human Health Effects PFAS Levels and Regulation PFAS Water Treatment

Well water throughout California contaminated with ‘forever chemicals’

In the weeks before the coronavirus began tearing through California, the city of Commerce made an expensive decision: It shut down part of its water supply. More:

Human Exposure

Human Health Effects PFAS Levels and Regulation PFAS Water Treatment
02/12/2020 -

Scientists have detailed more than 200 uses of PFAS chemicals in 64 industrial areas, including mining, book conservation, plastics production, photography, printing, watchmaking, car manufacturing, air conditioning, fingerprinting, and particle physics. Many of the uses, which are laid out in the research article below, were previously unknown. More:

The Public Right to Know Human Exposure

Toxic PFAS Chemicals Discovered in Hundreds of Products

Scientists have detailed more than 200 uses of PFAS chemicals in 64 industrial areas, including mining, book conservation, plastics production, photography, printing, watchmaking, car manufacturing, air conditioning, fingerprinting, and particle physics. Many of the uses, which are laid out in the research article below, were previously unknown. More:

The Public Right to Know Human Exposure
02/12/2020 -

A single PFAS chemical featured in the movie “Dark Waters” last year about contamination from a Teflon plant in Parkersburg, W.Va. resulted in a $670 million court settlement. A community study showed the chemical was linked to six diseases: kidney cancer, increased cholesterol, ulcerative colitis, thyroid disease, preeclampsia and testicular cancer. More:

PFAS in Food Packaging PFAS Environmental Contamination

PFAS chemicals are ubiquitous. A Pitt scientist is working to protect you from thousands of types at once

A single PFAS chemical featured in the movie “Dark Waters” last year about contamination from a Teflon plant in Parkersburg, W.Va. resulted in a $670 million court settlement. A community study showed the chemical was linked to six diseases: kidney cancer, increased cholesterol, ulcerative colitis, thyroid disease, preeclampsia and testicular cancer. More:

PFAS in Food Packaging PFAS Environmental Contamination
01/12/2020 -

Now, after years of criticism from environmental advocates who have long raised health concerns about the treatment, the pesticide has been found to also contain an array of toxic compounds known as PFAS. The so-called “forever chemicals,” which are found in a range of commercial products and never fully degrade, have been linked to cancer, low infant birth weights, and a range of diseases. More:


Toxic ‘forever chemicals’ found in pesticide used on millions of Mass. acres when spraying for mosquitoes

Now, after years of criticism from environmental advocates who have long raised health concerns about the treatment, the pesticide has been found to also contain an array of toxic compounds known as PFAS. The so-called “forever chemicals,” which are found in a range of commercial products and never fully degrade, have been linked to cancer, low infant birth weights, and a range of diseases. More:

01/12/2020 -

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are of concern because of their high persistence (or that of their degradation products) and their impacts on human and environmental health that are known or can be deduced from some well-studied PFAS. Currently, many different PFAS (on the order of several thousands) are used in a wide range of applications, and there is no comprehensive source of information on the many individual substances and their functions in different applications. More:


An overview of the uses of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS)

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are of concern because of their high persistence (or that of their degradation products) and their impacts on human and environmental health that are known or can be deduced from some well-studied PFAS. Currently, many different PFAS (on the order of several thousands) are used in a wide range of applications, and there is no comprehensive source of information on the many individual substances and their functions in different applications. More:

01/12/2020 -

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a class of synthetic organic substances with diverse structures, properties, uses, bioaccumulation potentials and toxicities. Despite this high diversity, all PFAS are alike in that they contain perfluoroalkyl moieties that are extremely resistant to environmental and metabolic degradation. More:


The high persistence of PFAS is sufficient for their management as a chemical class

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a class of synthetic organic substances with diverse structures, properties, uses, bioaccumulation potentials and toxicities. Despite this high diversity, all PFAS are alike in that they contain perfluoroalkyl moieties that are extremely resistant to environmental and metabolic degradation. More:

25/11/2020 -

PFAS compounds released in New Jersey are toxic to lab animals and people, stay in the human body for years, and were found in the blood of workers at two of Solvay’s plants. More:


Contaminants in New Jersey Soil and Water Are Toxic, Documents Reveal

PFAS compounds released in New Jersey are toxic to lab animals and people, stay in the human body for years, and were found in the blood of workers at two of Solvay’s plants. More:

17/11/2020 -

New Jersey has sued Solvay Specialty Polymers over its refusal to release secret studies of its PFAS chemicals. The company has forbidden the state agency from sharing the details of the chemicals’ effects on health and the environment on the grounds that they are confidential business information.. More:


Solvay Withholds Data About PFAS Pollution in New Jersey

New Jersey has sued Solvay Specialty Polymers over its refusal to release secret studies of its PFAS chemicals. The company has forbidden the state agency from sharing the details of the chemicals’ effects on health and the environment on the grounds that they are confidential business information. More:

17/11/2020 -

Research found that children exposed to PFAS had significantly reduced antibody concentrations after given tetanus and diphtheria vaccinations. A follow-up study of adult healthcare workers found similar results. Now researchers worry PFAS, will reduce the immunization’s effectiveness. More:


Covid: chemicals found in everyday products could hinder vaccine

Research found that children exposed to PFAS had significantly reduced antibody concentrations after given tetanus and diphtheria vaccinations. A follow-up study of adult healthcare workers found similar results. Now researchers worry PFAS, will reduce the immunization’s effectiveness. More:

12/11/2020 -

Studies suggest a connection between PFAS exposure and suppressed immune function, lower vaccine effectiveness, hypersensitivity and greater risk of autoimmune diseases. A recent review of human epidemiological studies by Rappazzo et al. shows that PFAS may influence antibody response to vaccination and other health issues, such as asthma. More:

Human Health Effects

PFAS Chemicals Harm the Immune System, Decrease Response to Vaccines, New EWG Review Finds

11/11/2020 -

The UN Special Rapporteur on Toxics and Human Rights was established 25 years ago because of growing concern regarding hazardous waste generated in Europe being dumped in Africa. A briefing discussed a report on issues of concern, detailing eight emerging policy issues and other issues of concern and a report on strengthening the science-policy interface for chemicals and waste management. More:


UN Special Rapporteur Emphasizes Right to Science in Managing Toxics

The UN Special Rapporteur on Toxics and Human Rights was established 25 years ago because of growing concern regarding hazardous waste generated in Europe being dumped in Africa. A briefing discussed a report on issues of concern, detailing eight emerging policy issues and other issues of concern and a report on strengthening the science-policy interface for chemicals and waste management. More:

10/11/2020 -

A chemical introduced by a manufacturer to replace a now-regulated PFAS substance has been found in New Jersey drinking water, and the company’s own research suggests that it can cause liver damage, according to emails obtained by Consumer Reports. More:

Non-targeted analysis

New PFAS Compound in N.J. Water May Be More Toxic Than Older One, Regulators Say

A chemical introduced by a manufacturer to replace a now-regulated PFAS substance has been found in New Jersey drinking water, and the company’s own research suggests that it can cause liver damage, according to emails obtained by Consumer Reports. More:

Non-targeted chemical analysis
07/11/2020 -

While communities across the U.S. have been struggling with massive pollution from the military’s use of firefighting foam that contains PFAS, Japan has awoken to its own environmental crisis from the industrial chemicals in the foam. More:


U.S. Military Responsible for Widespread PFAS Pollution in Japan

While communities across the U.S. have been struggling with massive pollution from the military’s use of firefighting foam that contains PFAS, Japan has awoken to its own environmental crisis from the industrial chemicals in the foam. More:

06/11/2020 -

Embedded in our furniture and our clothing, our electronics and our food, our carpets and our walls, flame resistant chemicals are everywhere. One type, known as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), have taken a lot of the heat. Not only can they easily leach into the environment, these retardants are commonly inhaled and ingested, where they begin to build up in the body. More:


House Dust Contains Potentially Harmful Flame Retardants Years After They Were Banned

Embedded in our furniture and our clothing, our electronics and our food, our carpets and our walls, flame resistant chemicals are everywhere. One type, known as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), have taken a lot of the heat. Not only can they easily leach into the environment, these retardants are commonly inhaled and ingested, where they begin to build up in the body. More:

02/11/2020 -

It was the start of the 2016 growing season when the farmers were told their water was contaminated. Susan Gordon and her husband had run Venetucci Farm for ten years. It was there, against the backdrop of the majestic Rocky Mountains, they had raised their two children. “I was devastated,” says Gordon. More:

The story of PFAS and its legacy Water contamination Human exposure Human exposure and Health effects A Legal battle PFAS management and regulation PFAS management and regulation

Toxic synthetic 'forever chemicals' are in our water and on our plates

It was the start of the 2016 growing season when the farmers were told their water was contaminated. Susan Gordon and her husband had run Venetucci Farm for ten years. It was there, against the backdrop of the majestic Rocky Mountains, they had raised their two children. “I was devastated,” says Gordon. More:

The story of PFAS and its legacy Water contamination Human exposure Human exposure and Health effects A Legal battle PFAS management and regulation PFAS management and regulation
25/10/2020 -

The robot made its way 3,000 feet down to the bottom, beaming bright lights and a camera as it slowly skimmed the seafloor. At this depth and darkness, the uncharted topography felt as eerie as driving through a vast desert at night. More:

The pollution story POPs Health Effects

How the waters off Catalina became a DDT dumping ground

The robot made its way 3,000 feet down to the bottom, beaming bright lights and a camera as it slowly skimmed the seafloor. At this depth and darkness, the uncharted topography felt as eerie as driving through a vast desert at night. More:

The pollution story POPs Health Effects
24/10/2020 -

Pregnant women in the Nunavik region in northern Quebec are twice as exposed to certain chemicals produced far from home than a representative sample of other Canadian women of the same age group, according to a study led by a researcher from Université Laval. More:


Pregnant Inuit women more exposed to 'the new PCBs' than other Canadians: study

Pregnant women in the Nunavik region in northern Quebec are twice as exposed to certain chemicals produced far from home than a representative sample of other Canadian women of the same age group, according to a study led by a researcher from Université Laval. More:

20/10/2020 -

Researchers find people's exposure to PFAS and certain flame retardants could be significantly reduced by opting for healthier building materials and furniture. If you've been considering throwing out that old couch, now might be a good time. Dust in buildings with older furniture is more likely to contain a suite of compounds that impact our health. More:


Dust from your old furniture likely contains harmful chemicals—but there’s a solution

Researchers find people's exposure to PFAS and certain flame retardants could be significantly reduced by opting for healthier building materials and furniture. If you've been considering throwing out that old couch, now might be a good time. Dust in buildings with older furniture is more likely to contain a suite of compounds that impact our health. More:

20/10/2020 -

Researchers are increasingly concerned about the presence of toxic industrial contaminants called PFAS in the Arctic. These can damage the immune system and may also make people more susceptible to the more severe effects of COVID-19. More:


Concern mounts over impact of toxic “forever chemicals” in the Arctic

Researchers are increasingly concerned about the presence of toxic industrial contaminants called PFAS in the Arctic. These can damage the immune system and may also make people more susceptible to the more severe effects of COVID-19. More:

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