POPs in the news

17/03/2021 -

Scientists have detected 109 chemicals in a study of pregnant women, including 55 chemicals never before reported in people and 42 "mystery chemicals," whose sources and uses are unknown. The chemicals most likely come from consumer products or other industrial sources. They were found both in the blood of pregnant women, as well as their newborn children, suggesting they are traveling through the mother's placenta. More:


Study finds evidence of 55 new chemicals in people

Scientists have detected 109 chemicals in a study of pregnant women, including 55 chemicals never before reported in people and 42 "mystery chemicals," whose sources and uses are unknown. The chemicals most likely come from consumer products or other industrial sources. They were found both in the blood of pregnant women, as well as their newborn children, suggesting they are traveling through the mother's placenta. More:

16/03/2021 -

It was a blazing-hot morning in October 2019 on the old Ho Chi Minh Trail, an intricate web of truck roads and secret paths that wove its way across the densely forested and mountainous border between Vietnam and Laos. Susan Hammond, Jacquelyn Chagnon and Niphaphone Sengthong forded a rocky stream along the trail and came to a village of about 400 people called Labeng-Khok, once the site of a logistics base inside Laos used by the North Vietnamese Army to infiltrate troops into the South. In one of the bamboo-and-thatch stilt houses, the ladder to the living quarters was made from metal tubes that formerly held American cluster bombs. More:


The Victims of Agent Orange the U.S. Has Never Acknowledged

It was a blazing-hot morning in October 2019 on the old Ho Chi Minh Trail, an intricate web of truck roads and secret paths that wove its way across the densely forested and mountainous border between Vietnam and Laos. Susan Hammond, Jacquelyn Chagnon and Niphaphone Sengthong forded a rocky stream along the trail and came to a village of about 400 people called Labeng-Khok, once the site of a logistics base inside Laos used by the North Vietnamese Army to infiltrate troops into the South. In one of the bamboo-and-thatch stilt houses, the ladder to the living quarters was made from metal tubes that formerly held American cluster bombs. More:

16/03/2021 -

A new study has made a significant advance in the field by identifying how environmental information is transmitted by non-DNA molecules in the sperm. It is a discovery that advances scientific understanding of the heredity of paternal life experiences and potentially opens new avenues for studying disease transmission and prevention. More:


Discovery identifies non-DNA mechanism involved in transmitting paternal experience to offspring

A new study has made a significant advance in the field by identifying how environmental information is transmitted by non-DNA molecules in the sperm. It is a discovery that advances scientific understanding of the heredity of paternal life experiences and potentially opens new avenues for studying disease transmission and prevention. More:

16/03/2021 -

The whole spectrum of reproductive problems in males are increasing by about 1 percent per year in Western countries. This “1 percent effect” includes the rates of declining sperm counts, decreasing testosterone levels and increasing rates of testicular cancer, as well as a rise in the prevalence of erectile dysfunction. On the female side of the equation, miscarriage rates are also increasing by about 1 percent per year in the U.S. More:

Humans reproductive health issues Endocrine-disrupting chemicals effect on human reproductive health Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and metabolic disorder

Reproductive Problems in Both Men and Women Are Rising at an Alarming Rate

The whole spectrum of reproductive problems in males are increasing by about 1 percent per year in Western countries. This “1 percent effect” includes the rates of declining sperm counts, decreasing testosterone levels and increasing rates of testicular cancer, as well as a rise in the prevalence of erectile dysfunction. On the female side of the equation, miscarriage rates are also increasing by about 1 percent per year in the U.S. More:

Humans reproductive health issues Endocrine-disrupting chemicals effect on human reproductive health Endocrine-disrupting chemicals and metabolic disorder
10/03/2021 -

There’s a looming solution to all of humanity’s problems — by 2045 most men may no longer be able to reproduce because of the impact of hormone-altering chemicals. That's according to Shanna Swan, a leading scholar of reproductive health. Four years ago, she calculated that the sperm count of the average man in Western countries had fallen by 59 percent from 1973 to 2011— making international headlines of a looming “spermageddon.” More:

Human health impact of chemicals

No more babies? The hormone-altering chemicals threatening human procreation

There’s a looming solution to all of humanity’s problems — by 2045 most men may no longer be able to reproduce because of the impact of hormone-altering chemicals. That's according to Shanna Swan, a leading scholar of reproductive health. Four years ago, she calculated that the sperm count of the average man in Western countries had fallen by 59 percent from 1973 to 2011— making international headlines of a looming “spermageddon.” More:

Human health impact of chemicals
10/03/2021 -

When Californians learned that the waters off Santa Catalina Island once served as a dumping ground for thousands of barrels of DDT waste, the ocean science community jumped into action. A crew was swiftly assembled, shipping lanes cleared, the gears set in motion for a deep-sea expedition aboard the Sally Ride, one of the most technologically advanced research vessels in the country. More:

Effects of DDT-contaminated marine water in sealife

Deep-sea ‘Roombas’ will comb ocean floor for DDT waste barrels near Catalina

When Californians learned that the waters off Santa Catalina Island once served as a dumping ground for thousands of barrels of DDT waste, the ocean science community jumped into action. A crew was swiftly assembled, shipping lanes cleared, the gears set in motion for a deep-sea expedition aboard the Sally Ride, one of the most technologically advanced research vessels in the country. More:

Effects of DDT-contaminated marine water in sealife
09/03/2021 -

The US Environmental Protection Agency is proposing to ban all uses of the wood preservative pentachlorophenol. The decision comes after the sole producer of the chemical in North America announced that it was shutting down its pentachlorophenol business by the end of this year. More:

Regulation of pentachlorophenol

The end of pentachlorophenol is near

The US Environmental Protection Agency is proposing to ban all uses of the wood preservative pentachlorophenol. The decision comes after the sole producer of the chemical in North America announced that it was shutting down its pentachlorophenol business by the end of this year. More:

Regulation of pentachlorophenol
05/03/2021 -

The testing done by Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER) found per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) — a class of chemicals tied to a wide range of health concerns, including cancer — in a handful of publicly available herbicides and insecticides. More:


PFAS in pesticides: 'A problem of epic proportions'

The testing done by Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER) found per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) — a class of chemicals tied to a wide range of health concerns, including cancer — in a handful of publicly available herbicides and insecticides. More:

05/03/2021 -

“Count Down,” which Shanna Swan wrote with the health and science journalist Stacey Colino, chronicles rising human infertility and warns of dire consequences for our species if this trend doesn’t slow. The reason, Swan explains, may be growing exposure to “endocrine disrupting chemicals” that are found in everything from plastics, flame retardants, electronics, food packaging and pesticides to personal care products and cosmetics. More:


The Everyday Chemicals That Might Be Leading Us to Our Extinction

“Count Down,” which Shanna Swan wrote with the health and science journalist Stacey Colino, chronicles rising human infertility and warns of dire consequences for our species if this trend doesn’t slow. The reason, Swan explains, may be growing exposure to “endocrine disrupting chemicals” that are found in everything from plastics, flame retardants, electronics, food packaging and pesticides to personal care products and cosmetics. More:

01/03/2021 -

In an international study, researchers assessed the chemical compositions of toys and estimated levels of human exposure to the substances, ultimately finding over 100 "Chemicals of Concern" in plastic toy materials that could pose a non-negligible health risk to children. More:


Huge, Global Study of Plastic Toys Finds Over 100 Substances That May Harm Children

In an international study, researchers assessed the chemical compositions of toys and estimated levels of human exposure to the substances, ultimately finding over 100 "Chemicals of Concern" in plastic toy materials that could pose a non-negligible health risk to children. More:

26/02/2021 -

Since it was signed 20 years ago, the Stockholm Convention has helped countries throughout the world to carefully manage the use, storage, distribution, and disposal of a particularly dangerous group of hazardous chemicals, the persistent organic pollutants or POPs. More:


Managing chemicals for a cleaner, healthier planet

Since it was signed 20 years ago, the Stockholm Convention has helped countries throughout the world to carefully manage the use, storage, distribution, and disposal of a particularly dangerous group of hazardous chemicals, the persistent organic pollutants or POPs. More:

24/02/2021 -

The need to move away from the decades old, predominant linear mindset of “take, make, waste” towards a more circular one of “reuse, reduce, recycle” is something most of us can agree on. But when discussing and working towards a circular economy, there is one aspect that keeps getting surprisingly overlooked: The presence of hazardous chemicals. More:


Billions of reasons for phasing out toxic chemicals from products and material flows

The need to move away from the decades old, predominant linear mindset of “take, make, waste” towards a more circular one of “reuse, reduce, recycle” is something most of us can agree on. But when discussing and working towards a circular economy, there is one aspect that keeps getting surprisingly overlooked: The presence of hazardous chemicals. More:

24/02/2021 -

Since industrialisation, chemicals have been rolled out without sufficient testing, resulting in dire consequences for humans, animals and the environment. Well-known examples include DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) and PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls). Now in the spotlight: Polymeric FR (PolyFR), a flame retardant for foam building insulation. More:


How toxic is foam insulation?

Since industrialisation, chemicals have been rolled out without sufficient testing, resulting in dire consequences for humans, animals and the environment. Well-known examples include DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) and PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls). Now in the spotlight: Polymeric FR (PolyFR), a flame retardant for foam building insulation. More:

20/02/2021 -

Sperm counts have been dropping; infant boys are developing more genital abnormalities; more girls are experiencing early puberty; and adult women appear to be suffering declining egg quality and more miscarriages. More:

Chemical pollutants and altered human reproductive system Evolution of human reproductive sytem's caracteristics Endocrine disruptors and animal reproductive system

What Are Sperm Telling Us?

Sperm counts have been dropping; infant boys are developing more genital abnormalities; more girls are experiencing early puberty; and adult women appear to be suffering declining egg quality and more miscarriages. More:

Chemical pollutants and altered human reproductive system Evolution of human reproductive sytem's caracteristics Endocrine disruptors and animal reproductive system
16/02/2021 -

Cancer is already a leading killer of firefighters, yet the standards for water-resistant uniforms, known as turnout gear, call for them to contain per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) — a highly toxic class of chemicals linked to a wide variety of health problems even at very low doses. More:

Firefighters exposure to PFAS

Firefighters' Catch-22: Protective gear full of carcinogens

Cancer is already a leading killer of firefighters, yet the standards for water-resistant uniforms, known as turnout gear, call for them to contain per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) — a highly toxic class of chemicals linked to a wide variety of health problems even at very low doses. More:

Firefighters exposure to PFAS
15/02/2021 -

Many health experts and advocates say breastfeeding is the best choice for babies but the threat of passing on contamination from PFAS is prompting new questions. Maryann Jacobs’ heart was pounding as she opened her letterbox one snowy morning last year in Hoosick Falls, a town in upstate New York bordering Vermont and Massachusetts. Inside that envelope was devastating news that her baby son Oliver’s results were worse than she had feared. More:

Infant exposure and health effects to PFAS PFAS water pollution in US cities Incineration of PFAS chemicals - A case study

‘Am I going to regret it?': forever chemicals dilemma for breastfeeding mothers

Many health experts and advocates say breastfeeding is the best choice for babies but the threat of passing on contamination from PFAS is prompting new questions. Maryann Jacobs’ heart was pounding as she opened her letterbox one snowy morning last year in Hoosick Falls, a town in upstate New York bordering Vermont and Massachusetts. Inside that envelope was devastating news that her baby son Oliver’s results were worse than she had feared. More:

Infant exposure and health effects to PFAS PFAS water pollution in US cities Incineration of PFAS chemicals - A case study
10/02/2021 -

Minnesota is rolling out an ambitious statewide strategy to tackle the toxic cancer-linked "forever chemicals" polluting the state's rivers, lakes and drinking water. The entire chemical class would be deemed hazardous in proposal. More:


With PFAS everywhere, Minnesota calls for big new crackdown on the 'forever chemicals'

Minnesota is rolling out an ambitious statewide strategy to tackle the toxic cancer-linked "forever chemicals" polluting the state's rivers, lakes and drinking water. The entire chemical class would be deemed hazardous in proposal. More:

05/02/2021 -

A new study heightens concerns about firefighters’ exposure to the fluorinated “forever chemicals” known as PFAS: Nearly 99 percent of the fluorine found in tests of dust from inside fire stations likely came from unknown PFAS chemicals that could not be identified as ones that researchers had tested for. More:

Firefighters and PFAS Exposure Firefighters and PFAS Health Hazards

Study: Almost All Fluorine Detected in Fire Stations’ Dust Is From Unknown ‘Forever Chemicals'

A new study heightens concerns about firefighters’ exposure to the fluorinated “forever chemicals” known as PFAS: Nearly 99 percent of the fluorine found in tests of dust from inside fire stations likely came from unknown PFAS chemicals that could not be identified as ones that researchers had tested for. More:

Firefighters and PFAS Exposure Firefighters and PFAS Health Hazards
02/02/2021 -

To protect the health of people, communities and the environment, the toxic fluorinated “forever chemicals” known as PFAS should not be regulated one by one but as a class, more than a dozen scientists, including this author, argue in an article published today in the peer-reviewed journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters. More:

PFAS as a Chemical Class PFAS Regulation PFAS Pollution and Exposure PFAS Toxicity and Health Effects

‘Forever Chemicals’ Must Be Regulated as a Class

To protect the health of people, communities and the environment, the toxic fluorinated “forever chemicals” known as PFAS should not be regulated one by one but as a class, more than a dozen scientists, including this author, argue in an article published today in the peer-reviewed journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters. More:

PFAS as a Chemical Class PFAS Regulation PFAS Pollution and Exposure PFAS Toxicity and Health Effects
02/02/2021 -

The global study from the Danish Consumer Council THINK Chemicals has found that cosmetic products can contain unwanted chemicals, including allergenic substances and substances that are suspected of being endocrine disruptors. They also found that ‘identical’ cosmetic products from the same brands can contain different chemicals depending on which country they are marketed in. More:


Shopping for cosmetics? - Make sure you know what’s in the products

The global study from the Danish Consumer Council THINK Chemicals has found that cosmetic products can contain unwanted chemicals, including allergenic substances and substances that are suspected of being endocrine disruptors. They also found that ‘identical’ cosmetic products from the same brands can contain different chemicals depending on which country they are marketed in. More:

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