POPs in the news

02/02/2021 -

The residents of Wreck Bay, on the New South Wales south coast, allege Defence negligently allowed perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl (PFAS) chemicals to leech into surface water, groundwater, and soil. More:


PFAS contamination class action filed by Jervis Bay community for cultural loss

The residents of Wreck Bay, on the New South Wales south coast, allege Defence negligently allowed perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl (PFAS) chemicals to leech into surface water, groundwater, and soil. More:

01/02/2021 -

Sea lions in California had been dying of a mysterious cancer for decades. Now, scientists say they have finally uncovered the likely cause: toxic chemicals from industrial trash, pesticides and oil refinery waste. More:


Mysterious California sea lion deaths linked to toxic synthetic chemicals

Sea lions in California had been dying of a mysterious cancer for decades. Now, scientists say they have finally uncovered the likely cause: toxic chemicals from industrial trash, pesticides and oil refinery waste. More:

28/01/2021 -

A South Jersey chemical company knew that a group of its “forever chemicals” was damaging to human health but hid that from federal regulators for at least six years, according to a petition filed by an advocacy group to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. More:


Company kept details on new ‘forever chemicals’ hidden for years, advocacy group tells EPA

A South Jersey chemical company knew that a group of its “forever chemicals” was damaging to human health but hid that from federal regulators for at least six years, according to a petition filed by an advocacy group to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. More:

26/01/2021 -

Firefighters are demanding independent testing for cancer-linked chemicals known as PFAS in their gear and that their union drop sponsorships from chemical and equipment makers. More:


Firefighters Battle an Unseen Hazard: Their Gear Could Be Toxic

Firefighters are demanding independent testing for cancer-linked chemicals known as PFAS in their gear and that their union drop sponsorships from chemical and equipment makers. More:

25/01/2021 -

The researchers analyzed 526 drinking water samples across 66 Chinese cities for perfluoro- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), which are durable, man-made chemicals found in products such as textiles, firefighting foam, and pesticides. The study concluded that just under 100 million people in the examined cities have PFAS concentrations in their drinking water above safe levels. More:


Hot Spots H2O: Research Finds High Levels of PFAS Contaminants in Chinese Drinking Water

The researchers analyzed 526 drinking water samples across 66 Chinese cities for perfluoro- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), which are durable, man-made chemicals found in products such as textiles, firefighting foam, and pesticides. The study concluded that just under 100 million people in the examined cities have PFAS concentrations in their drinking water above safe levels. More:

22/01/2021 -

Many Americans fill up a glass of water from their faucet without worrying whether it might be dangerous. But the crisis of lead-tainted water in Flint, Mich., showed that safe, potable tap water is not a given in this country. Now a study from the Environmental Working Group (EWG), a nonprofit advocacy organization, reveals a widespread problem: the drinking water of a majority of Americans likely contains “forever chemicals.” More:


Forever Chemicals Are Widespread in U.S. Drinking Water

Many Americans fill up a glass of water from their faucet without worrying whether it might be dangerous. But the crisis of lead-tainted water in Flint, Mich., showed that safe, potable tap water is not a given in this country. Now a study from the Environmental Working Group (EWG), a nonprofit advocacy organization, reveals a widespread problem: the drinking water of a majority of Americans likely contains “forever chemicals.” More:

19/01/2021 -

An assortment of toxic per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) migrated into Anvil 10+10 from containers made of high-density polyethylene (HPDE) treated with fluorinated compounds and used to store and transport the pesticide, the EPA says. Anvil 10+10 is a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide used to control mosquitoes. More:


Mosquito spray tainted with PFAS from shipping containers

An assortment of toxic per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) migrated into Anvil 10+10 from containers made of high-density polyethylene (HPDE) treated with fluorinated compounds and used to store and transport the pesticide, the EPA says. Anvil 10+10 is a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide used to control mosquitoes. More:

14/01/2021 -

For the last two decades, the European Union has played a leadership role in tackling the risks hazardous chemicals pose to our health and environment. It has now proposed a new vision for a "toxic-free environment" and published a strategy for moving the EU towards that goal. Just as its current policies have inspired imitation, it’s likely that these new policies will drive significant changes in the U.S. and elsewhere. More:

Corporates' safer chemicals initiatives

How the EU’s new ‘toxic-free’ vision could shape your safer chemicals strategy

For the last two decades, the European Union has played a leadership role in tackling the risks hazardous chemicals pose to our health and environment. It has now proposed a new vision for a "toxic-free environment" and published a strategy for moving the EU towards that goal. Just as its current policies have inspired imitation, it’s likely that these new policies will drive significant changes in the U.S. and elsewhere. More:

Corporates' safer chemicals initiatives
14/01/2021 -

"Prevention is the cure for child/teen cancer." This is the welcoming statement on a website called 'TheReasonsWhy.Us', where families affected by childhood cancers can sign up for a landmark new study into the potential environmental causes. More:


Op-ed: A push for answers about the environmental causes of child cancer

"Prevention is the cure for child/teen cancer." This is the welcoming statement on a website called 'TheReasonsWhy.Us', where families affected by childhood cancers can sign up for a landmark new study into the potential environmental causes. More:

13/01/2021 -

Shredded carpet waste is increasingly used in equestrian riding centers. This waste is used along with polyflakes (a residual product from the textile industry) and geopad (shredded geotextile fabric). Crushed used car tires are applied to sports fields and playgrounds; this is what makes up the so-called rubber granulate. More:


Children's playgrounds are a source of toxic microplastics

Shredded carpet waste is increasingly used in equestrian riding centers. This waste is used along with polyflakes (a residual product from the textile industry) and geopad (shredded geotextile fabric). Crushed used car tires are applied to sports fields and playgrounds; this is what makes up the so-called rubber granulate. More:

12/01/2021 -

A study led by scientists at the Institute of Zoology at the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) found high levels of PCBs were linked to smaller testicles in otherwise healthy animals. More:


Ocean pollutants 'have negative effect on male fertility'

A study led by scientists at the Institute of Zoology at the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) found high levels of PCBs were linked to smaller testicles in otherwise healthy animals. More:

12/01/2021 -

Toxicologists are expressing concern that exposure to per- or poly-fluorinated substances (PFASs) can increase a person’s likelihood of developing severe Covid-19. There are also warning that PFASs could also diminish the effectiveness of a vaccine against the novel coronavirus. More:


PFAS exposure found to increase risk of severe Covid-19

Toxicologists are expressing concern that exposure to per- or poly-fluorinated substances (PFASs) can increase a person’s likelihood of developing severe Covid-19. There are also warning that PFASs could also diminish the effectiveness of a vaccine against the novel coronavirus. More:

05/01/2021 -

The chemicals in our environments, while sometimes useful, can also hurt us. Materials like asbestos fibers can move through the air and into the lungs in the form of tiny particles, causing long-term damage to human tissues. But free-floating, harmful chemicals are also emitted from the furniture, wallpaper, flooring, and household items around us. And these chemicals are entering our bodies, damaging them in many different ways. More:

Semivolatile Organic Compounds (SVOCs) in indoor air SVOCs - Exposure and Health Effects The Gut Microbiome and Health

Chemicals called SVOCs, emitted from household objects, are altering children’s microbiomes

The chemicals in our environments, while sometimes useful, can also hurt us. Materials like asbestos fibers can move through the air and into the lungs in the form of tiny particles, causing long-term damage to human tissues. But free-floating, harmful chemicals are also emitted from the furniture, wallpaper, flooring, and household items around us. And these chemicals are entering our bodies, damaging them in many different ways. More:

Semivolatile Organic Compounds (SVOCs) in indoor air SVOCs - Exposure and Health Effects The Gut Microbiome and Health
28/12/2020 -

A Michigan-based environmental group has found many nonstick pans are coated with a chemical from the PFAS family. The group tested 14 cooking pans and 10 baking pans from different retailers in different price ranges. It found 77% of the cooking pans were coated with PTFE, polytetrafluoroethylene. 20% of the baking pans had PTFE. More:


Nonstick pans often don't note they use PFAS

A Michigan-based environmental group has found many nonstick pans are coated with a chemical from the PFAS family. The group tested 14 cooking pans and 10 baking pans from different retailers in different price ranges. It found 77% of the cooking pans were coated with PTFE, polytetrafluoroethylene. 20% of the baking pans had PTFE. More:

23/12/2020 -

A group of manmade substances that can cause serious health problems in humans and animals is increasingly threatening U.S. drinking water systems, experts say. Scientists are working hard to better understand per-and polyfluoroalkyl substances — or PFAS — and develop technologies to minimize harm from these extraordinarily durable pollutants. More:

PFAS Remediation Technologies PFAS Remediation Investment

PFAS chemicals are turning up in tap water across the country. How do we get them out

A group of manmade substances that can cause serious health problems in humans and animals is increasingly threatening U.S. drinking water systems, experts say. Scientists are working hard to better understand per-and polyfluoroalkyl substances — or PFAS — and develop technologies to minimize harm from these extraordinarily durable pollutants. More:

PFAS Remediation Technologies PFAS Remediation Investment
18/12/2020 -

"Forever chemicals" used in water-repellant outdoor gear have been found in snow from the top of Mount Everest. These human-made per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS)—which have been linked to birth defects, high cholesterol and increased risk of kidney and testicular cancer—could eventually pose a risk for trekkers, climbers and residents who drink the water. More:


Miner finds outdoor gear 'forever chemicals' in snow near Everest summit

"Forever chemicals" used in water-repellant outdoor gear have been found in snow from the top of Mount Everest. These human-made per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS)—which have been linked to birth defects, high cholesterol and increased risk of kidney and testicular cancer—could eventually pose a risk for trekkers, climbers and residents who drink the water. More:

17/12/2020 -

Chemicals called PFAS – known as forever chemicals – are in the blood of virtually every person on the planet. And they will only accumulate. Studies are now raising concerns that some of these forever chemicals may negatively impact our immune system – and possibly even the efficacy of vaccines. More:


The poison found in everyone, even unborn babies – and who is responsible for it

Chemicals called PFAS – known as forever chemicals – are in the blood of virtually every person on the planet. And they will only accumulate. Studies are now raising concerns that some of these forever chemicals may negatively impact our immune system – and possibly even the efficacy of vaccines. More:

16/12/2020 -

The troubles tainting his tap: per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), a broad category of chemicals invented in the mid-1900s to add desirable properties such as stain-proofing and anti-sticking to shoes, cookware and other everyday objects. Manufacturers in Fayetteville, North Carolina had been discharging them into the Cape Fear River — a regional drinking water source — for decades. More:

Human Health Effects Regulations

From Alaska to Florida, harmful PFAS compounds pollute water at multiple sites in every state

The troubles tainting his tap: per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), a broad category of chemicals invented in the mid-1900s to add desirable properties such as stain-proofing and anti-sticking to shoes, cookware and other everyday objects. Manufacturers in Fayetteville, North Carolina had been discharging them into the Cape Fear River — a regional drinking water source — for decades. More:

Human Health Effects Regulations
10/12/2020 -

Cotton accounts for only around 2.3% of the world’s arable land, but it uses over 16% of global insecticides. Between pesticides and synthetic fertilizers, the global cotton crop uses 8.2 million metric tons of chemicals. Those inputs impoverish the soil, pollute waterways, decimate biodiversity and often poison people, too. More:

Alternatives Textile Industry's Environmental Impact

Changing the Fabric of Our Clothes to Cut Climate Emissions

Cotton accounts for only around 2.3% of the world’s arable land, but it uses over 16% of global insecticides. Between pesticides and synthetic fertilizers, the global cotton crop uses 8.2 million metric tons of chemicals. Those inputs impoverish the soil, pollute waterways, decimate biodiversity and often poison people, too. More:

Alternatives Textile Industry's Environmental Impact
07/12/2020 -

Elevated levels of a PFAS compound were associated with more severe forms of Covid-19, according to a Danish study. The research, which involved 323 patients infected with the coronavirus, found that those who had elevated levels of a chemical called PFBA were more than twice as likely to have a severe form of the disease. More:


PFAS Chemical Associated With Severe Covid-19

Elevated levels of a PFAS compound were associated with more severe forms of Covid-19, according to a Danish study. The research, which involved 323 patients infected with the coronavirus, found that those who had elevated levels of a chemical called PFBA were more than twice as likely to have a severe form of the disease. More:

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