POPs in the news

20/06/2023 -

Bisphenyl A (BPA) is used to make plastics and can come into our bodies through ingestion, inhalation, or touch. Though research shows BPA is mostly broken down and disposed of by our bodies in a matter of hours, it can potentially be harmful, especially over years of exposure. More:

Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals Bisphenol A - Health Effects

What BPA can do to our bodies—and how to limit your exposure

Bisphenyl A (BPA) is used to make plastics and can come into our bodies through ingestion, inhalation, or touch. Though research shows BPA is mostly broken down and disposed of by our bodies in a matter of hours, it can potentially be harmful, especially over years of exposure. More:

Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals Bisphenol A: Health Effects
15/06/2023 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Environmental Protection Agency is warning that two nonstick and stain-resistant compounds found in drinking water are more dangerous than previously thought — and pose health risks even at levels so low they cannot currently be detected. More:


EPA says ‘forever chemicals’ pose a health risk even at very low levels

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Environmental Protection Agency is warning that two nonstick and stain-resistant compounds found in drinking water are more dangerous than previously thought — and pose health risks even at levels so low they cannot currently be detected. More:

14/06/2023 -

A recent British Medical Journal Open study revealed that 39 years after the Bhopal gas explosion, the devastating industrial disaster is still haunting future generations. Males who were exposed to the gas leak while they were still in the womb were more likely to have a disability that affected their employment and also, at a 27-fold higher risk of cancer. More:

Human Health Effects

Almost 40 Years Later, The Bhopal Gas Explosion Is Causing 27-Fold Greater Cancer Risk

A recent British Medical Journal Open study revealed that 39 years after the Bhopal gas explosion, the devastating industrial disaster is still haunting future generations. Males who were exposed to the gas leak while they were still in the womb were more likely to have a disability that affected their employment and also, at a 27-fold higher risk of cancer. More:

Human Health Effects
14/06/2023 -

Partnering with EHN.org, the environmental wellness blog and community had 40 electrolyte products (from 30 brands) tested by a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-certified lab and found levels of total fluorine ranging from 10 parts per million, or ppm, to 105 ppm in nine of them. More:

PFAS in Consumer Products PFAS in Consumer Products: Contact Lenses and Personal Care PFAS in Food Fluorine Toxicity

Are you replenishing your electrolytes with a dose of PFAS?

Partnering with EHN.org, the environmental wellness blog and community had 40 electrolyte products (from 30 brands) tested by a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-certified lab and found levels of total fluorine ranging from 10 parts per million, or ppm, to 105 ppm in nine of them. More:

PFAS in Consumer Products PFAS in Consumer Products: Contact Lenses and Personal Care PFAS in Food Fluorine Toxicity
14/06/2023 -

Plants may seem defenseless against insects, having neither hands nor tail to brush them away. But many produce potent repellent chemicals, ranging from ones that just taste or smell bad to ones that can kill. These stealthy survival tactics could teach us how to curb the widespread use of chemical pesticides in agriculture. More:

Plants Self-defense against pests Biological Control Genetic Modification for Pest Control

Natural pest control: Plants enlist their enemies’ enemies

Plants may seem defenseless against insects, having neither hands nor tail to brush them away. But many produce potent repellent chemicals, ranging from ones that just taste or smell bad to ones that can kill. These stealthy survival tactics could teach us how to curb the widespread use of chemical pesticides in agriculture. More:

Plants Self-defense against pests Biological Control Genetic Modification for Pest Control
13/06/2023 -

Illinois Gov. JB Pritzker signed into law the new legislation that was spurred by a 2019 incident in which a helicopter and a plane sprayed dozens of farmworkers with pesticides, causing health problems for the workers and their infant children. Previously, under the old fine system, applicators who exposed humans to pesticides could escape with little-to-no monetary penalties. More:


Illinois enacts law increasing penalties for exposing humans to pesticides

Illinois Gov. JB Pritzker signed into law the new legislation that was spurred by a 2019 incident in which a helicopter and a plane sprayed dozens of farmworkers with pesticides, causing health problems for the workers and their infant children. Previously, under the old fine system, applicators who exposed humans to pesticides could escape with little-to-no monetary penalties. More:

09/06/2023 -

It’s hard to avoid PFAS, but experts say there are ways to mitigate your exposure to the man-made chemicals. Across the country, states are banning forever chemicals from consumer products, and some companies are promising to phase out use of the compounds. More:

PFAS in Food and Food Packaging

How can I avoid eating food with ‘forever’ chemicals?

It’s hard to avoid PFAS, but experts say there are ways to mitigate your exposure to the man-made chemicals. Across the country, states are banning forever chemicals from consumer products, and some companies are promising to phase out use of the compounds. More:

PFAS in Food and Food Packaging

‘Forever chemicals’ exposure can lead to low birth weight and obesity in later life

08/06/2023 -

Transparency. That’s one of the most important things when it comes to getting rid of toxic chemicals. The problem is that there’s too little of it right now. But a new legislative proposal might change this. So-called product passports would increase chemical transparency and drive the market towards safer products. More:


Product passports can detoxify the market. But not everyone likes the idea

Transparency. That’s one of the most important things when it comes to getting rid of toxic chemicals. The problem is that there’s too little of it right now. But a new legislative proposal might change this. So-called product passports would increase chemical transparency and drive the market towards safer products. More:

07/06/2023 -

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) failure to effectively regulate seeds coated with highly toxic pesticides violates federal pesticide laws and is devastating pollinators, wildlife, and landscapes across the country, according to environmental groups who filed a lawsuit last week. More:

Neonicotinoids Assessment and Evaluation Neonicotinoid Seed Treatment Treated Seed: Waste and Recycling

Pesticide-Coated Seeds Are the Focus of a New Push for EPA Regulations

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) failure to effectively regulate seeds coated with highly toxic pesticides violates federal pesticide laws and is devastating pollinators, wildlife, and landscapes across the country, according to environmental groups who filed a lawsuit last week. More:

Neonicotinoids Assessment and Evaluation Neonicotinoid Seed Treatment Treated Seed: Waste and Recycling
07/06/2023 -

Secretly held documents from the two most prominent manufacturers of 'forever chemicals' show that industry leaders knew of the harmful health effects of some per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) long before they told the public. More:

Scientifc Research and Transparency Industry Documents on PFAS PFOS Lawsuits

These Companies Kept Silent About 'Forever Chemicals' For Decades

Secretly held documents from the two most prominent manufacturers of 'forever chemicals' show that industry leaders knew of the harmful health effects of some per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) long before they told the public. More:

Scientifc Research and Transparency Industry Documents on PFAS PFOS Lawsuits
06/06/2023 -

More than 1,400 pesticides contain active ingredients that meet Maine’s definition for the toxic “forever chemicals” known as PFAS, according to a new analysis of data from the state by Environmental Working Group researchers. More:

Defining Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) PFAS in Pesticides and Packaging PFAS Environmental Fate PFAS Health Effects U.S. Legislation on Pesticides and PFAS

Maine data unveils troubling trend: 55 PFAS-related chemicals in over 1,400 pesticides

More than 1,400 pesticides contain active ingredients that meet Maine’s definition for the toxic “forever chemicals” known as PFAS, according to a new analysis of data from the state by Environmental Working Group researchers. More:

Defining Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) PFAS in Pesticides and Packaging PFAS Environmental Fate PFAS Health Effects U.S. Legislation on Pesticides and PFAS
05/06/2023 -

I first started at ChemSec back in 2010. I remember my first task was to research and find out if investors factor in the risk of hazardous chemicals in their portfolio analyses. What I found out was that only 18 out of 152 asset managers and rating agencies within the realm of Socially Responsible Investments (SRI) did so. Far too few. More:

PFAS Lawsuit Settlements Towards Sustainable Investment

3 reasons why investors are suddenly interested in chemicals

I first started at ChemSec back in 2010. I remember my first task was to research and find out if investors factor in the risk of hazardous chemicals in their portfolio analyses. What I found out was that only 18 out of 152 asset managers and rating agencies within the realm of Socially Responsible Investments (SRI) did so. Far too few. More:

PFAS Lawsuit Settlements Towards Sustainable Investment
05/06/2023 -

Stephen and Sandra Swanson were eating dinner beside their Christmas tree in 2017 when a Navy official rang the doorbell with alarming news: Hazardous chemicals from firefighting foam, used during training exercises at a nearby military airstrip, had seeped into their well water. More:

PFAS in Aquatic Systems PFAS Toxicity and Health Effects PFAS: Legal Action and Regulation

States take matters into their own hands to ban ‘forever chemicals’

Stephen and Sandra Swanson were eating dinner beside their Christmas tree in 2017 when a Navy official rang the doorbell with alarming news: Hazardous chemicals from firefighting foam, used during training exercises at a nearby military airstrip, had seeped into their well water. More:

PFAS in Aquatic Systems PFAS Toxicity and Health Effects PFAS: Legal Action and Regulation
04/06/2023 -

The companies Chemours, DuPont and Corteva announced they have agreed to pay more than $1 billion to settle claims that “forever chemicals” contaminated public US water systems. More:

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS)

Three companies agree to pay more than $1 billion to settle ‘forever chemical’ claims

The companies Chemours, DuPont and Corteva announced they have agreed to pay more than $1 billion to settle claims that “forever chemicals” contaminated public US water systems. More:

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS)
01/06/2023 -

A trickle of studies warning that the enormous variety of living things on Earth is diminishing has turned into a flood. The evidence for these losses within regions and globally is undeniable. But data on biodiversity, and what is causing its decline, is still patchy – restricted to some causes, some places and some species. That isn’t the case for birds in Europe, however. More:


Europe has lost over half a billion birds in 40 years. The single biggest cause? Pesticides and fertilizers

A trickle of studies warning that the enormous variety of living things on Earth is diminishing has turned into a flood. The evidence for these losses within regions and globally is undeniable. But data on biodiversity, and what is causing its decline, is still patchy – restricted to some causes, some places and some species. That isn’t the case for birds in Europe, however. More:

01/06/2023 -

Plastics contain toxic chemicals that can enter products and interact to create new harmful substances during the recycling process, a new report from Greenpeace and the International Pollutants Elimination Network (IPEN) shows. More:

Chemicals in Plastics

Recycling plastics “extremely problematic” due to toxic chemical additives: Report

Plastics contain toxic chemicals that can enter products and interact to create new harmful substances during the recycling process, a new report from Greenpeace and the International Pollutants Elimination Network (IPEN) shows. More:

Chemicals in Plastics
01/06/2023 -

Consumer groups are condemning the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for allowing plastic containers made with toxic PFAS “forever chemicals” to continue being distributed across the economy – even though the agency is suing a top manufacturer over the dangerous compounds leaching into containers’ contents, such as food or personal care products. More:

Fluorinated Barrier Packaging PFAS in Food Containers

Plastic containers still distributed across the US are a potential health disaster

Consumer groups are condemning the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for allowing plastic containers made with toxic PFAS “forever chemicals” to continue being distributed across the economy – even though the agency is suing a top manufacturer over the dangerous compounds leaching into containers’ contents, such as food or personal care products. More:

Fluorinated Barrier Packaging PFAS in Food Containers
01/06/2023 -

Several major agrochemical companies did not disclose to European Union authorities studies assessing the toxic effects of pesticide ingredients on brain development, research said on Thursday. More:


Firms withheld pesticide toxicity data from EU: study

Several major agrochemical companies did not disclose to European Union authorities studies assessing the toxic effects of pesticide ingredients on brain development, research said on Thursday. More:

31/05/2023 -

Scientists behind a new study discovered that two kinds of bacteria, Desulfovibrio aminophilus and Sporomusa sphaeroides, can break down chlorinated PFAS, a subgroup of PFAS used to repel water in packaging and electronics. The microbes are able to sever a key chemical bond in those PFAS, unraveling the compounds, rendering them harmless. More:


Scientists Identify Bacteria That Can Break Down ‘Forever Chemicals’

Scientists behind a new study discovered that two kinds of bacteria, Desulfovibrio aminophilus and Sporomusa sphaeroides, can break down chlorinated PFAS, a subgroup of PFAS used to repel water in packaging and electronics. The microbes are able to sever a key chemical bond in those PFAS, unraveling the compounds, rendering them harmless. More:

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