POPs in the news

19/07/2023 -

The pesticide companies Bayer and Syngenta have been excoriated in a European parliament hearing after failing to disclose studies on the brain toxicity of their products. More:


‘Outrageous’: MEPs condemn pesticide companies for withholding toxicity data

The pesticide companies Bayer and Syngenta have been excoriated in a European parliament hearing after failing to disclose studies on the brain toxicity of their products. More:

19/07/2023 -

California researchers have found new evidence that several chemicals used in plastic production and a wide array of other industrial applications are commonly present in the blood of pregnant women, creating increased health risks for mothers and their babies. More:

Exposure and Environmental Risks Water Pollution and Settlements PFOS Phase Out

Researchers find evidence of ‘forever chemicals’ in blood of pregnant women

California researchers have found new evidence that several chemicals used in plastic production and a wide array of other industrial applications are commonly present in the blood of pregnant women, creating increased health risks for mothers and their babies. More:

Exposure and Environmental Risks Water Pollution and Settlements PFOS Phase Out
17/07/2023 -

AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) — A bill requiring manufacturers to report their use of a class of toxic chemicals and phase them out by 2030 is now the law in Maine. The law that took effect Thursday was one of several legislative proposals to address contamination by so-called PFAS, short for perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances, which have long been used in a variety of consumer products. More:


Maine requires so-called PFAS to be phased out by 2030

AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) — A bill requiring manufacturers to report their use of a class of toxic chemicals and phase them out by 2030 is now the law in Maine. The law that took effect Thursday was one of several legislative proposals to address contamination by so-called PFAS, short for perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances, which have long been used in a variety of consumer products. More:

14/07/2023 -

OAKDALE, Minn. — The last time Amara Strande testified in front of Minnesota lawmakers, her voice was shaky, a side effect of the tumor pressing on her throat and the cancer that had spread through her lungs. More:

PFAS Water and Soil Contamination PFAS Human Health and Environmental Impact PFAS Socio-Economic Impact PFAS Regulation Lawsuits, Settlements and PFAS Phase out

She died fighting ‘forever chemicals.’ They still linger in her town

OAKDALE, Minn. — The last time Amara Strande testified in front of Minnesota lawmakers, her voice was shaky, a side effect of the tumor pressing on her throat and the cancer that had spread through her lungs. More:

PFAS Water and Soil Contamination PFAS Human Health and Environmental Impact PFAS Socio-Economic Impact PFAS Regulation Lawsuits, Settlements and PFAS Phase out
13/07/2023 -

A University of Sydney led study published today in Nature has revealed the chemical odyssey pesticides embark upon after their initial agricultural application, with environmental consequences for a range of ecosystems. More:


Global analysis shows how pesticides leach into the environment

A University of Sydney led study published in Nature has revealed the chemical odyssey pesticides embark upon after their initial agricultural application, with environmental consequences for a range of ecosystems. More:

12/07/2023 -

Wrappers from eight brands of butter have detectable levels of total fluorine, an indicator of the group of chemicals known as PFAS, according to a new report from Mamavation. Partnering with EHN.org, the environmental wellness blog and community had 32 wrappers from 22 brands tested by a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-certified lab and found levels of total fluorine ranging from 11 parts per million to 112 ppm in 16 of the wrappers. More:

Per-and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) PFAS in Food PFAS in Food Packaging PFAS in Consumer Products PFAS in Personal Care

Are you spreading PFAS on your morning toast?

Wrappers from eight brands of butter have detectable levels of total fluorine, an indicator of the group of chemicals known as PFAS, according to a new report from Mamavation. Partnering with EHN.org, the environmental wellness blog and community had 32 wrappers from 22 brands tested by a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-certified lab and found levels of total fluorine ranging from 11 parts per million to 112 ppm in 16 of the wrappers. More:

Per-and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) PFAS in Food PFAS in Food Packaging PFAS in Consumer Products PFAS in Personal Care
10/07/2023 -

A recent study by Healthy Building Network finds 50% of paints tested contain PFAS. Chief Research Officer Teresa McGrath shares the risks and how to avoid these dangerous chemicals in paint. More:

Per-and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) PFAS in Paint PFAS in Food, Cosmetics and Clothing

Opinion: Why PFAS have no place in everyday products, including paint

A recent study by Healthy Building Network finds 50% of paints tested contain PFAS. Chief Research Officer Teresa McGrath shares the risks and how to avoid these dangerous chemicals in paint. More:

Per-and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) PFAS in Paint PFAS in Food, Cosmetics and Clothing
07/07/2023 -

According to a new federal study, 45 percent of the United States’s tap water supply could contain at least one form of PFAS, a class of “forever chemicals” that’s been tied to negative health outcomes. More:

PFAS in Drinking Water PFAS Decontamination - Water Filters PFAS Regulation

What to do if you’re worried about “forever chemicals” in your drinking water

07/07/2023 -

At least 45% of the nation’s tap water is estimated to have one or more types of the chemicals known as per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances, or PFAS, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey. More:

PFAS Drinking Water Contamination PFAS Exposure: Human Health and Environmental Risks

Toxic ‘forever chemicals’ taint nearly half of U.S. tap water, study estimates

At least 45% of the nation’s tap water is estimated to have one or more types of the chemicals known as per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances, or PFAS, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey. More:

PFAS Drinking Water Contamination PFAS Exposure: Human Health and Environmental Risks
06/07/2023 -

Canada recently took its first bold step to regulate the production and use of a large group of chemicals called per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS, a family of environmentally persistent and toxic chemical compounds. More:

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) PFAS Characteristics PFAS Uses Human Exposure and Health Effects

Canada Will Start Regulating ‘Forever Chemicals.’ What to Know

Canada recently took its first bold step to regulate the production and use of a large group of chemicals called per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS, a family of environmentally persistent and toxic chemical compounds. More:

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) PFAS Characteristics PFAS Uses Human Exposure and Health Effects
05/07/2023 -

In Pierre-Bénite, just south of Lyon, a plant belonging to French chemical giant Arkema has become the focus of accusations. For decades, tonnes of PFAs, or so-called forever chemicals, have been released into the environment. More:


Forever chemicals: French company poisoned environment near Lyon for decades, locals claim

In Pierre-Bénite, just south of Lyon, a plant belonging to French chemical giant Arkema has become the focus of accusations. For decades, tonnes of PFAs, or so-called forever chemicals, have been released into the environment. More:

04/07/2023 -

Pets living near a PFAS manufacturing plant in Fayetteville, North Carolina have concerning levels of the toxic chemicals in their blood, and show evidence of health effects linked to exposure, new research finds. More:


High levels of toxic chemicals in pets living near US manufacturing plant

Pets living near a PFAS manufacturing plant in Fayetteville, North Carolina have concerning levels of the toxic chemicals in their blood, and show evidence of health effects linked to exposure, new research finds. More:

30/06/2023 -

Declining biodiversity threatens the very basis of human life. Science contends that there are many reasons for this decline. However, while much research is being conducted into the connection between species decline on the one hand and loss of habitats, invasion by non-native species or climate change on the other, science is giving less attention to the impact of chemicals on biodiversity.  More:


How use of chemicals and biodiversity loss are connected

Declining biodiversity threatens the very basis of human life. Science contends that there are many reasons for this decline. However, while much research is being conducted into the connection between species decline on the one hand and loss of habitats, invasion by non-native species or climate change on the other, science is giving less attention to the impact of chemicals on biodiversity. More:

29/06/2023 -

Firefighters’ turnout gear — the heavy clothing they don before fighting a fire — is essential protective equipment. But the textiles that make the clothing fireproof carry hazards of their own. A May report published by the National Institute of Standards and Technology concludes that “forever chemicals” known as PFAS — some linked to cancer — are present in textiles commonly used in the gear. More:

PFAS in Firefighter Gear PFAS in Artificial Turf PFAS Exposure and Health Risks

Firefighter gear is full of cancer-causing PFAS. What can be done about it?

Firefighters’ turnout gear — the heavy clothing they don before fighting a fire — is essential protective equipment. But the textiles that make the clothing fireproof carry hazards of their own. A May report published by the National Institute of Standards and Technology concludes that “forever chemicals” known as PFAS — some linked to cancer — are present in textiles commonly used in the gear. More:

PFAS in Firefighter Gear PFAS in Artificial Turf PFAS Exposure and Health Risks
23/06/2023 -

CNN — Every year, the textile industry uses 1.3 trillion gallons of water to dye garments – enough to fill 2 million Olympic-sized swimming pools. Most of this water, loaded with harmful chemicals and dyes, flows untreated into rivers and streams More:


One-fifth of water pollution comes from textile dyes. But a shellfish-inspired solution could clean it up

CNN — Every year, the textile industry uses 1.3 trillion gallons of water to dye garments – enough to fill 2 million Olympic-sized swimming pools. Most of this water, loaded with harmful chemicals and dyes, flows untreated into rivers and streams More:

23/06/2023 -

Known colloquially as “forever chemicals,” PFAS — short for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances — are a large group of chemicals that make certain products nonstick or stain resistant. Research indicates that these chemicals can be dangerous. Exposure to PFAS is linked to cancers, weakened immune systems among children, weight gain, and a wide range of other health problems. More:

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) PFAS Contamination in the U.S PFAS in Drinking Water PFAS in Consumer Products Human Health Effects Human Health Effects: The Immune System Corporate Statements on PFAS PFAS Decontamination and Destruction Technologies

You probably have “forever chemicals” in your body. Here’s what that means.

Known colloquially as “forever chemicals,” PFAS — short for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances — are a large group of chemicals that make certain products nonstick or stain resistant. Research indicates that these chemicals can be dangerous. Exposure to PFAS is linked to cancers, weakened immune systems among children, weight gain, and a wide range of other health problems. More:

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) PFAS Contamination in the U.S PFAS in Drinking Water PFAS in Consumer Products Human Health Effects Human Health Effects: The Immune System Corporate Statements on PFAS PFAS Decontamination and Destruction Technologies
21/06/2023 -

Have you heard about the illness Polymer Fume Fever, also called Teflon flu? It is a condition of chest tightness, coughs and headaches caused by the fumes formed when PTFE (Teflon) is heated above 450°C. The illness was described already back in 1965 in a scientific article. More:

Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) Polymer Fume Fever PFAS Potential Impacts PFAS Risk Evaluation The PFAS and Microplastics Connection PFAS Regulation

Slam debunkin’ three myths about fluoropolymers

Have you heard about the illness Polymer Fume Fever, also called Teflon flu? It is a condition of chest tightness, coughs and headaches caused by the fumes formed when PTFE (Teflon) is heated above 450°C. The illness was described already back in 1965 in a scientific article. More:

Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) Polymer Fume Fever PFAS Potential Impacts PFAS Risk Evaluation The PFAS and Microplastics Connection PFAS Regulation
21/06/2023 -

In a new study, researchers from North Carolina State University detected elevated PFAS levels in the blood of pet dogs and horses from Gray's Creek, N.C.—including dogs that only drank bottled water. The work establishes horses as an important sentinel species and is a step toward investigating connections between PFAS exposure and liver and kidney function in dogs and horses. More:


PFAS found in blood of dogs, horses living near Fayetteville, NC

In a new study, researchers from North Carolina State University detected elevated PFAS levels in the blood of pet dogs and horses from Gray's Creek, N.C.—including dogs that only drank bottled water. The work establishes horses as an important sentinel species and is a step toward investigating connections between PFAS exposure and liver and kidney function in dogs and horses. More:

21/06/2023 -

When grown as a monoculture crop, coffee plants face a barrage of attacks by insects, bacteria and fungi. Climate change may also exacerbate these attacks. On larger coffee plantations in particular, this has led to the increased use of pesticides, the primary weapons that farmers use to combat unwanted guests. More:

Pesticides Ecotoxicity Pesticides Biological Control Pesticides Genomic Technology Human Health Effects

How pesticides threaten our daily cup of coffee

When grown as a monoculture crop, coffee plants face a barrage of attacks by insects, bacteria and fungi. Climate change may also exacerbate these attacks. On larger coffee plantations in particular, this has led to the increased use of pesticides, the primary weapons that farmers use to combat unwanted guests. More:

Pesticides Ecotoxicity Pesticides Biological Control Pesticides Genomic Technology Human Health Effects
20/06/2023 -

The so-called risk-based approach to harmful chemicals is a fundamental idea upon which the chemical industry rests. Advocates of this approach argue that as long as you limit exposure to a hazardous chemical, it doesn’t pose a problem. Most chemical legislations worldwide follow this principle; that’s why there are hundreds of thousands of chemicals with unknown effects in circulation and thousands that we know are detrimental to human health and the environment. More:


3M argues against the risk-based approach in court

The so-called risk-based approach to harmful chemicals is a fundamental idea upon which the chemical industry rests. Advocates of this approach argue that as long as you limit exposure to a hazardous chemical, it doesn’t pose a problem. Most chemical legislations worldwide follow this principle; that’s why there are hundreds of thousands of chemicals with unknown effects in circulation and thousands that we know are detrimental to human health and the environment. More:

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