POPs in the news

01/07/2021 -

The Clean Water Standards for PFAS Act would set deadlines for the Environmental Protection Agency to issue standards that polluters must meet before discharging PFAS waste into surface water or sending wastewater containing the chemicals to waste treatment plants. More:


EWG applauds House for advancing bill to limit PFAS discharges into water

The Clean Water Standards for PFAS Act would set deadlines for the Environmental Protection Agency to issue standards that polluters must meet before discharging PFAS waste into surface water or sending wastewater containing the chemicals to waste treatment plants. More:

29/06/2021 -

We've heard this in our conversations with residents of PFAS-affected communities, and in their public talks—calls for medical screening to learn about potential effects on their own and their families' health. However, people exposed to PFAS often face significant hurdles in getting screened for health effects from the exposure. And that needs to change. More:


Improved medical screening in PFAS-impacted communities to identify early disease

We've heard this in our conversations with residents of PFAS-affected communities, and in their public talks—calls for medical screening to learn about potential effects on their own and their families' health. However, people exposed to PFAS often face significant hurdles in getting screened for health effects from the exposure. And that needs to change. More:

29/06/2021 -

Efforts to end plastic pollution with recycling could leave people and the environment laden with poisonous chemicals, a new study has found. The report assessed four recycling and plastic waste management techniques that are poised to become more common as countries try to reduce plastic pollution. It found the main solutions promoted by the plastic industry — recycling, incineration, and transforming plastic into fuel — will increase people's risk of exposure to a cocktail of toxic chemicals. More:


Plastic recycling could be more dangerous than you think

Efforts to end plastic pollution with recycling could leave people and the environment laden with poisonous chemicals, a new study has found. The report assessed four recycling and plastic waste management techniques that are poised to become more common as countries try to reduce plastic pollution. It found the main solutions promoted by the plastic industry — recycling, incineration, and transforming plastic into fuel — will increase people's risk of exposure to a cocktail of toxic chemicals. More:

28/06/2021 -

According to a report jointly conducted by Arnika, a Czech environmental non-governmental organization (NGO), and the International Pollutants Elimination Network (IPEN), a global network of environmental and public health organizations working for a toxics-free future, various toxic chemicals were found in free-range chicken eggs in the vicinity of plastic waste disposal sites and facilities. More:


Plastic waste's poisonous journey through food chain

According to a report jointly conducted by Arnika, a Czech environmental non-governmental organization (NGO), and the International Pollutants Elimination Network (IPEN), a global network of environmental and public health organizations working for a toxics-free future, various toxic chemicals were found in free-range chicken eggs in the vicinity of plastic waste disposal sites and facilities. More:

28/06/2021 -

Trade groups are opposing the global regulation of toxic and persistent chemicals in microplastics, according to documents obtained by investigative journalists. The industry argued that there is still insufficient evidence to justify the incorporation of the plastic additive UV-328 into the Stockholm Convention, the UN’s global treaty on persistent organic pollutants (POPs) – chemicals which, once released, do not easily break down in nature. More:

UV-328 in Humans, Animals and the Environment UV-328 Toxicity

The oil and chemical industry is lobbying against landmark global regulation of microplastic chemicals

Trade groups are opposing the global regulation of toxic and persistent chemicals in microplastics, according to documents obtained by investigative journalists. The industry argued that there is still insufficient evidence to justify the incorporation of the plastic additive UV-328 into the Stockholm Convention, the UN’s global treaty on persistent organic pollutants (POPs) – chemicals which, once released, do not easily break down in nature. More:

UV-328 in Humans, Animals and the Environment UV-328 Toxicity
24/06/2021 -

Toxic pollution is not an inevitable byproduct of prosperity. The choice between poisoning or poverty is a false one, writes the EEB’s Senior Policy Officer for Economic Transition Nick Meynen. The massive and growing ‘forever chemicals’ scandal marks the culmination and possible endpoint of the endless growth logic, not to mention the privatising of profit and the socialising of costs. More:

PFAS Human Health Effects Environmental Rights Changing the economic growth paradigm

The link between forever growth and Belgium's 'forever chemicals' scandal

Toxic pollution is not an inevitable byproduct of prosperity. The choice between poisoning or poverty is a false one, writes the EEB’s Senior Policy Officer for Economic Transition Nick Meynen. The massive and growing ‘forever chemicals’ scandal marks the culmination and possible endpoint of the endless growth logic, not to mention the privatising of profit and the socialising of costs. More:

PFAS Human Health Effects Environmental Rights Changing the economic growth paradigm
22/06/2021 -

Plastic is practical, cheap and incredibly popular. Every year, more than 350 million tons are produced worldwide. These plastics contain a huge variety of chemicals that may be released during their lifecycles—including substances that pose a significant risk to people and the environment. However, only a small proportion of the chemicals contained in plastic are publicly known or have been extensively studied. More:


Worrying insights into the chemicals in plastics

Plastic is practical, cheap and incredibly popular. Every year, more than 350 million tons are produced worldwide. These plastics contain a huge variety of chemicals that may be released during their lifecycles—including substances that pose a significant risk to people and the environment. However, only a small proportion of the chemicals contained in plastic are publicly known or have been extensively studied. More:

22/06/2021 -

A suite of harmful chemicals are added to plastic and food packaging to give them desirable traits, like grease resistance or flexibility. When they burn or break down, these chemicals contaminate the surrounding environment and animals living or feeding nearby. More:


The plastics you throw away are poisoning the world's eggs

A suite of harmful chemicals are added to plastic and food packaging to give them desirable traits, like grease resistance or flexibility. When they burn or break down, these chemicals contaminate the surrounding environment and animals living or feeding nearby. More:

21/06/2021 -

The world’s soils are under tremendous pressure, damaged and poisoned by farming, mining, industrial, and urban pollution due to poor waste management. We are in trouble if this continues because the soils provide us with 95% of our food. Furthermore, they are the second-largest active store of carbon after the oceans and thus essential in combating climate change. More:


UN Pollution Report Warns Soils Worldwide Are Under Severe Pressure

The world’s soils are under tremendous pressure, damaged and poisoned by farming, mining, industrial, and urban pollution due to poor waste management. We are in trouble if this continues because the soils provide us with 95% of our food. Furthermore, they are the second-largest active store of carbon after the oceans and thus essential in combating climate change. More:

19/06/2021 -

Despite the potential and still largely unknown risks posed by PFAS – in part due to the huge number of different compounds involved – many 'forever chemicals' are still found in common products in use today. This includes cosmetics sold in North America, Europe and Asia, research has found. More:

Research on PFAS in Cosmetic and Personal Care Products

Potentially Harmful 'Forever Chemicals' Found to Be Widespread in US Cosmetics

Despite the potential and still largely unknown risks posed by PFAS – in part due to the huge number of different compounds involved – many 'forever chemicals' are still found in common products in use today. This includes cosmetics sold in North America, Europe and Asia, research has found. More:

Research on PFAS in Cosmetic and Personal Care Products
18/06/2021 -

People who wear makeup such as lipstick or mascara may be absorbing or licking up potentially harmful ingredients that hang around for decades in the environment, according to a new study by researchers in the U.S., Canada and Switzerland. More:

PFAS Regulations in Canada

How to make sense of the new findings on 'forever chemicals' in makeup

People who wear makeup such as lipstick or mascara may be absorbing or licking up potentially harmful ingredients that hang around for decades in the environment, according to a new study by researchers in the U.S., Canada and Switzerland. More:

PFAS Regulations in Canada
16/06/2021 -

Researchers at Karolinska Institute found industrial chemicals in the organs of fetuses conceived decades after many countries had banned the substances. In a study published in the journal Chemosphere, the researchers urge decision makers to consider the combined impact of the mix of chemicals that accumulate in people and nature. More:


Several persistent chemicals found in fetal organs

Researchers at Karolinska Institute found industrial chemicals in the organs of fetuses conceived decades after many countries had banned the substances. In a study published in the journal Chemosphere, the researchers urge decision makers to consider the combined impact of the mix of chemicals that accumulate in people and nature. More:

15/06/2021 -

Many cosmetics sold in the United States and Canada likely contain high levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), a potentially toxic class of chemicals linked to a number of serious health conditions, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame. More:

Dermal Exposure to PFAS PFAS in cosmetics

Use of PFAS in cosmetics 'widespread,' new study finds

Many cosmetics sold in the United States and Canada likely contain high levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), a potentially toxic class of chemicals linked to a number of serious health conditions, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame. More:

Dermal Exposure to PFAS PFAS in cosmetics
13/06/2021 -

Researchers have found that several long-lasting human-made contaminants have been building up in Arctic lakes, polar bears and ringed seals and other wildlife. These contaminants belong to a family of chemicals called polyfluoroalkyl and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), and are used in food packaging, waterproof clothing and firefighting foams. The true number of PFAS that exist is hard to pin down, but estimates suggest there are more than 4,700 types. More:

PFAS: Long-range environmental transport, bioaccumulation and biomagnification in wildlife, including in food sources PFAS in indigenous communities

Toxic, long-lasting contaminants detected in people living in northern Canada

Researchers have found that several long-lasting human-made contaminants have been building up in Arctic lakes, polar bears and ringed seals and other wildlife. These contaminants belong to a family of chemicals called polyfluoroalkyl and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), and are used in food packaging, waterproof clothing and firefighting foams. The true number of PFAS that exist is hard to pin down, but estimates suggest there are more than 4,700 types. More:

PFAS: Long-range environmental transport, bioaccumulation and biomagnification in wildlife, including in food sources PFAS in indigenous communities
11/06/2021 -

What do raincoats, pizza boxes, frozen vegetable packaging and nonstick frying pans have in common? They all contain perfluorinated alkylated substances (PFAS). Known as "forever chemicals" by experts, they could be damaging human health. More:

PFAS Water Contamination PFOA Exposure: Cancer Incidence PFAS exposure: Socioeconomic analysis of environmental and health impacts

Teflon and 'forever chemicals:' The hidden toxins in your body

What do raincoats, pizza boxes, frozen vegetable packaging and nonstick frying pans have in common? They all contain perfluorinated alkylated substances (PFAS). Known as "forever chemicals" by experts, they could be damaging human health. More:

PFAS Water Contamination PFOA Exposure: Cancer Incidence PFAS exposure: Socioeconomic analysis of environmental and health impacts
08/06/2021 -

Rain that fell on Ohio this spring contained a surprisingly high amount of toxic “forever chemicals” known as PFAS, according to raw data from a binational Great Lakes monitoring program that tracks airborne pollution. The Integrated Atmospheric Deposition Network (IADN), a long-term Great Lakes monitoring program was jointly funded by the US EPA and Canada. More:

Rainwater as a source of PFAS

It’s literally raining PFAS around the Great Lakes, say researchers

Rain that fell on Ohio this spring contained a surprisingly high amount of toxic “forever chemicals” known as PFAS, according to raw data from a binational Great Lakes monitoring program that tracks airborne pollution. The Integrated Atmospheric Deposition Network (IADN), a long-term Great Lakes monitoring program was jointly funded by the US EPA and Canada. More:

Rainwater as a source of PFAS
03/06/2021 -

For decades, the people living in the Swedish town of Kallinge got their tap water from a treatment plant that turned out to be contaminated with harmful PFAS chemicals. It has been a long journey with many legal and medical twists and turns for the close to 5,000 inhabitants of Kallinge since December of 2013. That’s when high levels of PFAS – more than 100 times the EU limit value – were discovered in the water treatment plant run by the municipally owned water company. More:


Why high levels of PFAS should be a personal injury by law

For decades, the people living in the Swedish town of Kallinge got their tap water from a treatment plant that turned out to be contaminated with harmful PFAS chemicals. It has been a long journey with many legal and medical twists and turns for the close to 5,000 inhabitants of Kallinge since December of 2013. That’s when high levels of PFAS – more than 100 times the EU limit value – were discovered in the water treatment plant run by the municipally owned water company. More:

28/05/2021 -

Sewage sludge that wastewater treatment districts across America package and sell as home fertilizer contain alarming levels of toxic PFAS. Sludge, which is lightly treated and marketed as “biosolids”, is used by consumers to fertilize home gardens, and the PFAS levels raise concerns that the chemicals are contaminating vegetables and harming those who eat them. More:

Biosolids as a vector of toxic chemicals PFAS Human exposure through sludge

‘Forever chemicals’ found in home fertilizer made from sewage sludge

Sewage sludge that wastewater treatment districts across America package and sell as home fertilizer contain alarming levels of toxic PFAS. Sludge, which is lightly treated and marketed as “biosolids”, is used by consumers to fertilize home gardens, and the PFAS levels raise concerns that the chemicals are contaminating vegetables and harming those who eat them. More:

Biosolids as a vector of toxic chemicals PFAS Human exposure through sludge
26/05/2021 -

We believe people already compromised from high exposures to toxic chemicals should not be exposed to additional toxics in their medical treatment. Many common medical products used today contain endocrine-disrupting chemicals, notably DEHP, a reproductive and developmental toxicant and carcinogen. More:

Toxic chemicals in Health Care Toxic chemicals and Environmental Justice

Ridding health care of environmental injustices and toxic chemicals

We believe people already compromised from high exposures to toxic chemicals should not be exposed to additional toxics in their medical treatment. Many common medical products used today contain endocrine-disrupting chemicals, notably DEHP, a reproductive and developmental toxicant and carcinogen. More:

Toxic chemicals in Health Care Toxic chemicals and Environmental Justice
24/05/2021 -

In early 2020, Jessian Choy, a journalist at the Sierra Magazine shared results from the laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics at the University of Notre Dame regarding potential PFAS contamination in the most popular period underwear brand. The results made it clear that products like period underwear could be manufactured with PFAS chemicals inside their “moisture-wicking” fabric. More:

PFAS Human Health Effects PFAS Maternal Exposure and Children Health Effects PFOA Exposure and Potential Effects Regulations on Ingredients in Feminine Hygiene and Cosmetic Products Toxicity: Evaluating Low-Dose Effects 

Report: 65% of Period Underwear Likely Contaminated with PFAS

In early 2020, Jessian Choy, a journalist at the Sierra Magazine shared results from the laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics at the University of Notre Dame regarding potential PFAS contamination in the most popular period underwear brand. The results made it clear that products like period underwear could be manufactured with PFAS chemicals inside their “moisture-wicking” fabric. More:

PFAS Human Health Effects PFAS Maternal Exposure and Children Health Effects PFOA Exposure and Potential Effects Regulations on Ingredients in Feminine Hygiene and Cosmetic Products Toxicity: Evaluating Low-Dose Effects 
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