POPs in the news

05/03/2024 -

Walking down any aisle in a supermarket, “BPA-free” labels declare food, water bottles, sippy cups, and other products to be clear of bisphenol A (BPA)—a chemical used in plastic and as a liner in food cans. Serious health concerns linked to BPA prompted manufacturers to synthesize dozens of chemical substitutes that are now incorporated into thousands of products. But are they safe? More:

Bisphenol A (BPA) Human Exposure Human Health Effects Impact on Fertility BPA Substitutes

We got rid of BPA in some products—but are the substitutes any safer?

Walking down any aisle in a supermarket, “BPA-free” labels declare food, water bottles, sippy cups, and other products to be clear of bisphenol A (BPA)—a chemical used in plastic and as a liner in food cans. Serious health concerns linked to BPA prompted manufacturers to synthesize dozens of chemical substitutes that are now incorporated into thousands of products. But are they safe? More:

Bisphenol A (BPA) Human Exposure Human Health Effects Impact on Fertility BPA Substitutes
05/03/2024 -

Scientists from the University of Rochester have developed new electrochemical approaches to clean up pollution from "forever chemicals" found in clothing, food packaging, firefighting foams, and a wide array of other products. A new Journal of Catalysis study describes nanocatalysts developed to remediate per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances known as PFAS. More:


Harmful 'forever chemicals' removed from water with new electrocatalysis method

Scientists from the University of Rochester have developed new electrochemical approaches to clean up pollution from "forever chemicals" found in clothing, food packaging, firefighting foams, and a wide array of other products. A new Journal of Catalysis study describes nanocatalysts developed to remediate per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances known as PFAS. More:

05/03/2024 -

Are you looking for the safest plastic sandwich bags similar to Ziploc without indication of PFAS “forever chemicals?” Mamavation sent several types of plastic sandwich bags to an EPA certified laboratory to find out which ones may be contaminated with PFAS. PFAS “forever chemicals” are per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances used as stain-resistant, water-resistant, & oil-resistant chemicals in commerce, however they are very toxic, persistent, and detrimental to hormonal health. More:


Plastic Sandwich Bags Like Ziploc Tested for Indications of PFAS “Forever Chemicals”

Are you looking for the safest plastic sandwich bags similar to Ziploc without indication of PFAS “forever chemicals?” Mamavation sent several types of plastic sandwich bags to an EPA certified laboratory to find out which ones may be contaminated with PFAS. PFAS “forever chemicals” are per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances used as stain-resistant, water-resistant, & oil-resistant chemicals in commerce, however they are very toxic, persistent, and detrimental to hormonal health. More:

05/03/2024 -

New food packaging products sold in the U.S., such as takeout boxes and fast-food wrappers, will no longer contain harmful "forever chemicals" known as PFAS. More:

Per- and Polyfluorinated Substances (PFAS) PFAS Phase Out in Food Packaging PFAS Body Burden and Impact PFAS Regulatory Considerations

PFAS 'forever chemicals' to officially be removed from food packaging, FDA says

New food packaging products sold in the U.S., such as takeout boxes and fast-food wrappers, will no longer contain harmful "forever chemicals" known as PFAS. More:

Per- and Polyfluorinated Substances (PFAS) PFAS Phase Out in Food Packaging PFAS Body Burden and Impact PFAS Regulatory Considerations
01/03/2024 -

When the simple blue-and-white postcard arrived in January 2023, Sarah Ferris missed it. The mailer, sent by the city of Vancouver, Washington, told 270,000 municipal water users that a group of chemicals called PFAS had been found in city water. Levels were low, the postcard said; the city would soon test again to comply with state law and share more information. More:

PFAS at Home PFAS in Drinking Water The Community's Right to Know

The dangers of PFAS — and of downplaying their ubiquity

When the simple blue-and-white postcard arrived in January 2023, Sarah Ferris missed it. The mailer, sent by the city of Vancouver, Washington, told 270,000 municipal water users that a group of chemicals called PFAS had been found in city water. Levels were low, the postcard said; the city would soon test again to comply with state law and share more information. More:

PFAS at Home PFAS in Drinking Water The Community's Right to Know
01/03/2024 -

Hundreds of chemical facilities around the US must implement new procedures to try to better safeguard communities from accidents that are happening with alarming frequency and jeopardizing human and environmental health, regulators said this week. More:

Chemical Incidents and Accidents Prevention and Safety

EPA moves to limit frequent chemical accidents

Hundreds of chemical facilities around the US must implement new procedures to try to better safeguard communities from accidents that are happening with alarming frequency and jeopardizing human and environmental health, regulators said this week. More:

Chemical Incidents and Accidents Prevention and Safety
01/03/2024 -

Is it time to rethink your cookware? Experts say that nonstick pots and pans—even those that are advertised to be free of the harmful chemicals known as PFAS—may still contain substances with unclear effects on your health. More:

Per- and Polyfluorinated Substances (PFAS) PFAS Uses PFAS in Food PFAS Alternatives

‘Forever chemicals’ are hiding in your kitchen. Here’s where—and what you can do

Is it time to rethink your cookware? Experts say that nonstick pots and pans—even those that are advertised to be free of the harmful chemicals known as PFAS—may still contain substances with unclear effects on your health. More:

Per- and Polyfluorinated Substances (PFAS) PFAS Uses PFAS in Food PFAS Alternatives
29/02/2024 -

The Pesticide Action Network (PAN) Europe report purported to track residues of 31 Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) — known as “forever chemicals” because they are impossible to eradicate — in fruit and vegetables in the EU between 2011 and 2021. More:


EU Policy. Fruit and veg increasingly tainted by 'forever-chemicals', NGO warns

The Pesticide Action Network (PAN) Europe report purported to track residues of 31 Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) — known as “forever chemicals” because they are impossible to eradicate — in fruit and vegetables in the EU between 2011 and 2021. More:

28/02/2024 -

Fast-food wrappers and packaging that contain so-called forever chemicals are no longer being sold in the U.S., the Food and Drug Administration announced. It Is the result of a voluntary effort with U.S. food manufacturers to phase out food contact packaging made with PFAS, the acronym for perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances, which do not degrade and can harm human health. More:


Fast-food wrappers that contain PFAS are no longer sold in the US, the FDA says

Fast-food wrappers and packaging that contain so-called forever chemicals are no longer being sold in the U.S., the Food and Drug Administration announced. It is the result of a voluntary effort with U.S. food manufacturers to phase out food contact packaging made with PFAS, the acronym for perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances, which do not degrade and can harm human health. More:

28/02/2024 -

Philip Landrigan, M.D., '63 director of the Program on Global Public Health and the Common Good and the Boston College Global Observatory on Planetary Health, is the lead author of a groundbreaking new report about the far-reaching health hazards of plastics manufacturing and pollution across the entire product life cycle. More:

Chemicals in Plastics Chemicals in Textiles Chemicals in Plastics: Recycling Chemicals in Plastics: Leaching or Migration Chemicals in Plastics: Environmental Impact Chemicals in Plastics: Impact on the Marine Environment Chemicals in Plastics: Impact on Wildlife

Health hazards of plastic: From cradle to grave

Philip Landrigan, M.D., '63 director of the Program on Global Public Health and the Common Good and the Boston College Global Observatory on Planetary Health, is the lead author of a groundbreaking new report about the far-reaching health hazards of plastics manufacturing and pollution across the entire product life cycle. More:

Chemicals in Plastics Chemicals in Textiles Chemicals in Plastics: Recycling Chemicals in Plastics: Leaching or Migration Chemicals in Plastics: Environmental Impact Chemicals in Plastics: Impact on the Marine Environment Chemicals in Plastics: Impact on Wildlife
27/02/2024 -

PCBs, or polychlorinated biphenyls, are human-made substances that were used as coolants and lubricants in electrical equipment until they were banned due to their links to health problems and because they do not break down easily in the environment. More:

Unintentional Production of PCBs PCBs in Marine Mammals

Cancer-causing PCB chemicals still being produced despite 40-year-old ban

PCBs, or polychlorinated biphenyls, are human-made substances that were used as coolants and lubricants in electrical equipment until they were banned due to their links to health problems and because they do not break down easily in the environment. More:

Unintentional Production of PCBs PCBs in Marine Mammals
27/02/2024 -

Plastics, pesticides and forever chemicals are exposing billions of people around the world to pernicious and dangerous health effects, a new report has found. In the report, scientists from the Endocrine Society and the International Pollutants Elimination Network criticized the way regulators determine the toxicity level of chemicals — and suggested that for a staggering array of common compounds, no dose may be safe. More:

Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals

For thousands of common chemicals, there is ‘no safe level,’ says report

Plastics, pesticides and forever chemicals are exposing billions of people around the world to pernicious and dangerous health effects, a new report has found. In the report, scientists from the Endocrine Society and the International Pollutants Elimination Network criticized the way regulators determine the toxicity level of chemicals — and suggested that for a staggering array of common compounds, no dose may be safe. More:

Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals
27/02/2024 -

All those chemical pesticides have had a profound impact on ecosystems and human health. It is why some countries have banned them, and the EU has long threatened — but failed — to outlaw glyphosate, a controversial weedkiller that threatens biodiversity and has been linked to the development of cancer. But what's the alternative?. More:


What are natural pesticides?

All those chemical pesticides have had a profound impact on ecosystems and human health. It is why some countries have banned them, and the EU has long threatened — but failed — to outlaw glyphosate, a controversial weedkiller that threatens biodiversity and has been linked to the development of cancer. But what's the alternative?. More:

27/02/2024 -

Il y a toujours plus de "polluants éternels" (PFAS) dans les fruits et légumes en Europe, dénoncent plusieurs ONG dans une enquête. La présence de pesticides contenant ces substances chimiques a explosé entre 2011 et 2021 dans les végétaux consommés dans l'Union européenne, notamment dans les fruits d'été. More:

PFAS in Pesticides

Explosion des "polluants éternels" dans les fruits et légumes européens

Il y a toujours plus de "polluants éternels" (PFAS) dans les fruits et légumes en Europe, dénoncent plusieurs ONG dans une enquête. La présence de pesticides contenant ces substances chimiques a explosé entre 2011 et 2021 dans les végétaux consommés dans l'Union européenne, notamment dans les fruits d'été. More:

PFAS in Pesticides
27/02/2024 -

Billions of denim garments are produced each year, with the global denim market valued at $63.5 billion in 2020. To produce this classic garment, producers rely on indigo dye, the only molecule known to provide jeans’ unique, beloved color. While indigo itself is naturally derived from a plant, growing demand for blue jeans throughout the 20th century gave rise to synthetic indigo, which is now more commonly used. More:

Blue Jeans Environmental Impact Alternatives for Denim Dyes

Blue jeans are terrible for the environment—but a new discovery could help

Billions of denim garments are produced each year, with the global denim market valued at $63.5 billion in 2020. To produce this classic garment, producers rely on indigo dye, the only molecule known to provide jeans’ unique, beloved color. While indigo itself is naturally derived from a plant, growing demand for blue jeans throughout the 20th century gave rise to synthetic indigo, which is now more commonly used. More:

Blue Jeans Environmental Impact Alternatives for Denim Dyes
27/02/2024 -

Analysis conducted by Pesticide Action Network Europe revives debate on PFAS ban covering active substances in pesticides. Residues of toxic “forever chemicals” substances traceable on fruit and vegetables has reportedly tripled in the EU over the last 10 years, according to an NGO report. More:


EU Policy. Fruit and veg increasingly tainted by 'forever-chemicals', NGO warns

Analysis conducted by Pesticide Action Network Europe revives debate on PFAS ban covering active substances in pesticides. Residues of toxic “forever chemicals” substances traceable on fruit and vegetables has reportedly tripled in the EU over the last 10 years, according to an NGO report. More:

27/02/2024 -

Does your favorite deodorant contain indications of PFAS “forever chemicals?” PFAS “forever chemicals” are per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances used as stain-resistant, water-resistant, & oil-resistant chemicals in commerce. More:

Ingredients of Concern in Deodorants

Indications of PFAS “Forever Chemicals” Found in Deodorants — Guide

Does your favorite deodorant contain indications of PFAS “forever chemicals?” PFAS “forever chemicals” are per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances used as stain-resistant, water-resistant, & oil-resistant chemicals in commerce. More:

Ingredients of Concern in Deodorants
26/02/2024 -

A UN human rights panel calls on the UN Environment Assembly to take on “forever chemicals” at a meeting in Nairobi, citing a North Carolina PFAS plant as an example of environmental negligence. More:

Chemicals of Concern

Chemours and DuPont Knew About Risks But Kept Making Toxic PFAS Chemicals, UN Human Rights Advisors Conclude

24/02/2024 -

Chlorinated paraffins (CPs), mainly short-chain CPs (SCCPs) and medium-chain CPs (MCCPs), are currently the most produced and used industrial chemicals related to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) globally. These chemicals are widely detected in the environment and in the human body. As the release of SCCPs and MCCPs from products represents only a small fraction of their stock in products, the potential long-term release of CPs from a large variety of products at the waste stage has become an issue of great concern. More:

Use and Trade of Chlorinated Paraffins Chlorinated Paraffins in the Environment Human Exposure

Exploring long-term global environmental impacts of chlorinated paraffins (CPs) in waste: Implications for the Stockholm and Basel Conventions and the global plastic treaty

Chlorinated paraffins (CPs), mainly short-chain CPs (SCCPs) and medium-chain CPs (MCCPs), are currently the most produced and used industrial chemicals related to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) globally. These chemicals are widely detected in the environment and in the human body. As the release of SCCPs and MCCPs from products represents only a small fraction of their stock in products, the potential long-term release of CPs from a large variety of products at the waste stage has become an issue of great concern. More:

Use and Trade of Chlorinated Paraffins Chlorinated Paraffins in the Environment Human Exposure
23/02/2024 -

Nanotechnology has pervaded numerous industrial sectors over the past decades. Although many of us may not be aware of it, nanomaterials are now embedded within many of the the products we use in our daily lives. Recent developments suggest that agriculture could be next in line. More:

Nanotechnology Nanotechnology in Pesticides

Nanotechnology promises to help farmers cut pesticide use – but could also make chemicals more toxic

Nanotechnology has pervaded numerous industrial sectors over the past decades. Although many of us may not be aware of it, nanomaterials are now embedded within many of the the products we use in our daily lives. Recent developments suggest that agriculture could be next in line. More:

Nanotechnology Nanotechnology in Pesticides
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