POPs in the news

20/12/2012 -

After years of study, scientists in the U.S. and Europe had reached an alarming conclusion: Flame retardants called polybrominated diphenyl ethers, or PBDEs, build up in blood and breast milk, interfere with natural hormones, trigger reproductive problems and cause developmental and neurological damage. More:
Chicago Tribune


Toxic flame retardant may get a reprieve

After years of study, scientists in the U.S. and Europe had reached an alarming conclusion: Flame retardants called polybrominated diphenyl ethers, or PBDEs, build up in blood and breast milk, interfere with natural hormones, trigger reproductive problems and cause developmental and neurological damage. More:
Chicago Tribune

17/12/2012 -

When a chemical company sets out to design a molecule for a new application, researchers think first about functionality, efficacy, and cost. Typically further down the list of priorities is environmental performance. Consumer awareness, however, is changing that perspective. More: 
Chemical & Engineering News


Designing Away Endocrine Disruption

When a chemical company sets out to design a molecule for a new application, researchers think first about functionality, efficacy, and cost. Typically further down the list of priorities is environmental performance. Consumer awareness, however, is changing that perspective. More: 
Chemical & Engineering News

13/12/2012 -

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is initiating a new effort to examine whether low doses of hormone-mimicking chemicals are harming human health and whether chemical testing should be overhauled. The EPA will evaluate whether current testing is capturing an array of effects linked to hormone mimics, and if the agency should alter its risk assessments. More:
Environmental Health News


EPA responds to scientists' concerns, initiates new effort for low-dose, hormone-like chemicals

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is initiating a new effort to examine whether low doses of hormone-mimicking chemicals are harming human health and whether chemical testing should be overhauled. The EPA will evaluate whether current testing is capturing an array of effects linked to hormone mimics, and if the agency should alter its risk assessments. More:
Environmental Health News

07/12/2012 -

The PCBs elimination network: the information exchange platform created for the risk reduction of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)” by Andrea Warmuth and Kei Ohno (Secretariat of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions, UNEP), appears in the January 2013 issue of the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.


PCBs elimination network: the information exchange platform

The PCBs elimination network: the information exchange platform created for the risk reduction of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)” by Andrea Warmuth and Kei Ohno (Secretariat of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions, UNEP), appears in the January 2013 issue of the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

28/11/2012 -

Consumers rarely know what chemicals are in the furniture products they buy because they are considered trade secrets. As a likely result, levels of flame-retardant chemicals in California children are among the world's highest, according to 2010 studies. More:
San Francisco Chronicle


Chemicals in furniture hard to avoid

Consumers rarely know what chemicals are in the furniture products they buy because they are considered trade secrets. As a likely result, levels of flame-retardant chemicals in California children are among the world's highest, according to 2010 studies. More:
San Francisco Chronicle

27/11/2012 -

Across the former Soviet Union harmful agricultural chemicals were either buried or improperly stored. Now the process of clean-up has begun. More:
The Guardian


Siberia's pesticide dumps may prove a bigger hazard than nuclear waste

Across the former Soviet Union harmful agricultural chemicals were either buried or improperly stored. Now the process of clean-up has begun. More:
The Guardian

27/11/2012 -

In the 1970s, when no one lived here, the local authorities thought that Tegul'det was an ideal spot to bury unwanted pesticide. Time passed and several families settled near the Tegul'det mound. It was an attractive spot, close to the river and not far from the main village. Tegul'det is far from being an isolated case. More:
The Guardian


Siberia's pesticide dumps may prove a bigger hazard than nuclear waste

In the 1970s, when no one lived here, the local authorities thought that Tegul'det was an ideal spot to bury unwanted pesticide. Time passed and several families settled near the Tegul'det mound. It was an attractive spot, close to the river and not far from the main village. Tegul'det is far from being an isolated case. More:
The Guardian

26/11/2012 -

As the phased-out stain repellent PFOS steadily decreases in people, its replacement is rising rapidly at levels that are doubling every six years, a Swedish study shows. Levels of perfluorobutane sulfonate (PFBS) in the women's blood rose 11 percent per year between 1996 and 2010. Whether there are any potential health effects of these exposures -- which are still far lower than PFOS levels -- is unknown. More:
Environmental Health News


New stain repellent chemical doubling in blood every 6 years

As the phased-out stain repellent PFOS steadily decreases in people, its replacement is rising rapidly at levels that are doubling every six years, a Swedish study shows. Levels of perfluorobutane sulfonate (PFBS) in the women's blood rose 11 percent per year between 1996 and 2010. Whether there are any potential health effects of these exposures -- which are still far lower than PFOS levels -- is unknown. More:
Environmental Health News

23/11/2012 -

From plastics to flame retardants, the ubiquitous chemicals of our daily lives have raised public health concerns like never before. Inside the Beltway, however, data-crunching scientists are often no match for industry lobbyists and corporate lawyers. More:
Scientific American


Chemical "Soup" Clouds Connection between Toxins and Poor Health

From plastics to flame retardants, the ubiquitous chemicals of our daily lives have raised public health concerns like never before. Inside the Beltway, however, data-crunching scientists are often no match for industry lobbyists and corporate lawyers. More:
Scientific American

22/11/2012 -

Populations of otters, grey seals and sea eagles are slowly recovering in Sweden, which is likely to be thanks in part to a ban on organochlorine chemicals, such as PCBs and DDT, in the 1970s, according to a new study. However, the research shows that negative effects of these chemicals on the reproductive health of female animals persisted for more than 15 years after the ban was introduced. More:
Science for Environment Policy 


Effects of organochlorine pollution on animals take a long time to wear off

Populations of otters, grey seals and sea eagles are slowly recovering in Sweden, which is likely to be thanks in part to a ban on organochlorine chemicals, such as PCBs and DDT, in the 1970s, according to a new study. However, the research shows that negative effects of these chemicals on the reproductive health of female animals persisted for more than 15 years after the ban was introduced. More:
Science for Environment Policy 

15/11/2012 -

Prenatal and childhood exposure to flame retardant compounds are linked to poorer attention, fine motor coordination and IQ in school-aged children, a finding by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley's School of Public Health that adds to growing health concerns over a chemical prevalent in U.S. households. More:
ScienceDaily


Flame Retardants Used in Foam Upholstered Furniture and Other Products Linked to Neurodevelopmental Delays in Children

Prenatal and childhood exposure to flame retardant compounds are linked to poorer attention, fine motor coordination and IQ in school-aged children, a finding by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley's School of Public Health that adds to growing health concerns over a chemical prevalent in U.S. households. More:
ScienceDaily

14/11/2012 -

Couples with high levels of PCBs and similar environmental pollutants take longer to achieve pregnancy in comparison to other couples with lower levels of the pollutants, according to a preliminary study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions. More:
NIH News - USA


PCBs, other pollutants may play role in pregnancy delay

Couples with high levels of PCBs and similar environmental pollutants take longer to achieve pregnancy in comparison to other couples with lower levels of the pollutants, according to a preliminary study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions. More:
NIH News - USA

13/11/2012 -

In a sobering study published in the journal Environmental Health, researchers at UC Davis and UCLA measured food-borne toxin exposure in children and adults by pinpointing foods with high levels of toxic compounds and determining how much of these foods were consumed. The researchers found that family members in the study, and preschool children in particular, are at high risk for exposure to arsenic, dieldrin, DDE (a DDT metabolite), dioxins and acrylamide. More:
UCDavis Health System - California, USA


Study finds high exposure to food-borne toxins - Preschool children are particularly vulnerable to compounds linked to cancer and other conditions

In a sobering study published in the journal Environmental Health, researchers at UC Davis and UCLA measured food-borne toxin exposure in children and adults by pinpointing foods with high levels of toxic compounds and determining how much of these foods were consumed. The researchers found that family members in the study, and preschool children in particular, are at high risk for exposure to arsenic, dieldrin, DDE (a DDT metabolite), dioxins and acrylamide. More:
UCDavis Health System - California, USA

08/11/2012 -

Legacy contaminants are decreasing more quickly than previously reported in three of the Great Lakes, but have stayed virtually the same in two other lakes, according to new research. “These are very positive results. The lakes are improving and slowly cleaning themselves up,” said Thomas Holsen, co-director of Clarkson University’s Center for the Environment. In all of the lakes, the older contaminants are being replaced by newer ones, mostly flame retardants, that are building up in fish and wildlife. More: 
Environmental Health News


The Great Lakes legacy: Old contaminants declining; newer ones on the rise

Legacy contaminants are decreasing more quickly than previously reported in three of the Great Lakes, but have stayed virtually the same in two other lakes, according to new research. “These are very positive results. The lakes are improving and slowly cleaning themselves up,” said Thomas Holsen, co-director of Clarkson University’s Center for the Environment. In all of the lakes, the older contaminants are being replaced by newer ones, mostly flame retardants, that are building up in fish and wildlife. More: 
Environmental Health News

07/11/2012 -

A pregnant woman's exposure to chemicals that make consumer products stain and water resistant may affect the growth and weight of her daughter at birth and later in life as a toddler. A British study has found that newborns whose mothers had higher levels of the polyfluoroalkyl compounds PFOS, PFOA and PFHxS during pregnancy weighed between 3 and 5 ounces less than girls born to mothers with lower levels. At 20 months, the girls born to mothers with higher exposures to PFOS were heavier when compared to those with lower exposures. Prior animal and human studies show similar trends. More: 
Environmental Health News


Higher PFCs when pregnant linked to smaller daughters at birth

A pregnant woman's exposure to chemicals that make consumer products stain and water resistant may affect the growth and weight of her daughter at birth and later in life as a toddler. A British study has found that newborns whose mothers had higher levels of the polyfluoroalkyl compounds PFOS, PFOA and PFHxS during pregnancy weighed between 3 and 5 ounces less than girls born to mothers with lower levels. At 20 months, the girls born to mothers with higher exposures to PFOS were heavier when compared to those with lower exposures. Prior animal and human studies show similar trends. More: 
Environmental Health News

02/11/2012 -

The long running saga of DuPont and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), often called simply C8, has passed an important milestone with the delivery of the final report from an independent panel of experts tasked with determining its health effects. More: 
Chemistry World


Panel delivers final PFOA report

The long running saga of DuPont and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), often called simply C8, has passed an important milestone with the delivery of the final report from an independent panel of experts tasked with determining its health effects. More: 
Chemistry World

24/10/2012 -

C’est par la ville de Buea que le centre de Recherche et d’Education Pour le Développement (CREPD) a lancé, lundi dernier, la vaste campagne régionale contre les Polluants Organiques Persistants (POP), produits chimiques dangereux et toxiques pour l’homme et l’environnement, selon les experts. More: 
La Nouvelle Expression - Cameroun Actu (French)


Cameroun Sud-Ouest: Croisade contre les polluants organiques persistants

C’est par la ville de Buea que le centre de Recherche et d’Education Pour le Développement (CREPD) a lancé, lundi dernier, la vaste campagne régionale contre les Polluants Organiques Persistants (POP), produits chimiques dangereux et toxiques pour l’homme et l’environnement, selon les experts. More: 
La Nouvelle Expression - Cameroun Actu (French)

23/10/2012 -

Interview with Jim Willis, Executive Secretary of the Secretariat of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions - As the Global Chemical Outlook points out, the 20th century led to the invention and worldwide use of thousands of synthetic chemicals whose global footprint has accumulated in almost every living thing, including human being. More:
Geneva International Cooperation


Geneva is the global centre of international chemicals and waste management work

Interview with Jim Willis, Executive Secretary of the Secretariat of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions - As the Global Chemical Outlook points out, the 20th century led to the invention and worldwide use of thousands of synthetic chemicals whose global footprint has accumulated in almost every living thing, including human being. More:
Geneva International Cooperation

22/10/2012 -

Geneva - Scientific experts meeting under the aegis of the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) concluded a five-day meeting in Geneva Oct. 19 with an agreement to advance proposals that would lead to eventual restrictions on the production and sale of four chemicals. More:
Bloomberg BNA 


POPs Review Panel Agrees to Propose Limits On Chemicals Under Stockholm Treaty

Geneva - Scientific experts meeting under the aegis of the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) concluded a five-day meeting in Geneva Oct. 19 with an agreement to advance proposals that would lead to eventual restrictions on the production and sale of four chemicals. More:
Bloomberg BNA 

11/10/2012 -

New Bedford, USA — A long-departed manufacturing company will pay $366 million to clean the PCB-laden harbor here, the largest cash settlement for a single site in the history of the federal Superfund program, government officials announced Wednesday. More:
The Boston Globe


$366m accord reached to clean up New Bedford Harbor

New Bedford, USA — A long-departed manufacturing company will pay $366 million to clean the PCB-laden harbor here, the largest cash settlement for a single site in the history of the federal Superfund program, government officials announced Wednesday. More:
The Boston Globe

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