POPs in the news

13/02/2020 -

The billion-dollar companies that made and used chemicals now popping up in water supplies around the country are switching to newer alternatives, but they haven’t escaped liabilities for historic environmental contamination. More:


Creating ‘Forever Chemicals': A Guide to PFAS Companies (2)

The billion-dollar companies that made and used chemicals now popping up in water supplies around the country are switching to newer alternatives, but they haven’t escaped liabilities for historic environmental contamination. More:

02/02/2020 -

Health and environmental concerns certainly played a role in the decision to ban the highly fluorinated waxes, which contain toxic synthetics commonly known as PFAS. But so did another factor: That some teams enjoy a competitive advantage by having greater financial resources to obtain the waxes. More:


Ski wax linked to forever chemicals – and a ‘dirty secret’ – to be banned

Health and environmental concerns certainly played a role in the decision to ban the highly fluorinated waxes, which contain toxic synthetics commonly known as PFAS. But so did another factor: That some teams enjoy a competitive advantage by having greater financial resources to obtain the waxes. More:

29/01/2020 -

Harmful levels of long-banned chemicals, including the pesticide DDT, have been found in the tissues of two vulnerable dolphin species swimming in waters flowing into the Great Barrier Reef. More:


DDT and other banned chemicals pose threat to vulnerable dolphins on Great Barrier Reef

Harmful levels of long-banned chemicals, including the pesticide DDT, have been found in the tissues of two vulnerable dolphin species swimming in waters flowing into the Great Barrier Reef. More:

29/01/2020 -

Drinking water has long been at the center of city health and environment debates as utilities and public works departments face pressure to keep the basic necessity safe for residents. A lack of [US] federal regulations has left cities scrambling to understand the health risks of PFAS and the most cost-effective ways to get it out of drinking water. More:

Case Study Report

The cost and confusion of cleaning PFAS contamination

Drinking water has long been at the center of city health and environment debates as utilities and public works departments face pressure to keep the basic necessity safe for residents. A lack of [US] federal regulations has left cities scrambling to understand the health risks of PFAS and the most cost-effective ways to get it out of drinking water. More:

Case Study Report
28/01/2020 -

Yet, we are hit daily with news about health epidemics that affect human populations: obesity rates continue to climb; more than a million new cancer cases are diagnosed in the US each year; one in every six American children has a developmental disability, and one in 59 have autism spectrum disorder. Many of these conditions are linked to hormones and endocrine health. More:


Vandenberg, Trasande, Sargis: Understanding endocrine disruptors

Yet, we are hit daily with news about health epidemics that affect human populations: obesity rates continue to climb; more than a million new cancer cases are diagnosed in the US each year; one in every six American children has a developmental disability, and one in 59 have autism spectrum disorder. Many of these conditions are linked to hormones and endocrine health. More:

24/01/2020 -

Fluorinated glide wax is being banned from elite competitions, and big brands like Swix say they’re searching for environmentally friendly alternatives. But the seductively speedy—and noxious—compounds are unlikely to loosen their grip on the sport anytime soon. More:


Nordic Skiing Has an Addiction to Toxic Wax

Fluorinated glide wax is being banned from elite competitions, and big brands like Swix say they’re searching for environmentally friendly alternatives. But the seductively speedy—and noxious—compounds are unlikely to loosen their grip on the sport anytime soon. More:

22/01/2020 -

The European Union (EU) has taken an important step towards cleaning up its recycling; it will no longer allow materials containing a class of toxic, globally banned flame retardants known as PBDEs to be recycled. More:


EU Withdraws its Toxic Recycling Exemption

The European Union (EU) has taken an important step towards cleaning up its recycling; it will no longer allow materials containing a class of toxic, globally banned flame retardants known as PBDEs to be recycled. More:

15/01/2020 -

On the day Susan Gordon learned Venetucci Farm, in Colorado, was contaminated, the vegetables looked just as good as ever, the grass as green, and the cattle, hogs, chickens, and goats as healthy. The beauty of the community farm she and her husband managed made the revelation all the more tragic. Chemicals known as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, invisible and insidious, had tainted the groundwater beneath her feet. More:

Exposure to PFAS Destruction technology

Scientists Fight Back Against Toxic ‘Forever’ Chemicals

On the day Susan Gordon learned Venetucci Farm, in Colorado, was contaminated, the vegetables looked just as good as ever, the grass as green, and the cattle, hogs, chickens, and goats as healthy. The beauty of the community farm she and her husband managed made the revelation all the more tragic. Chemicals known as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, invisible and insidious, had tainted the groundwater beneath her feet. More:

Exposure to PFAS Destruction technology
14/01/2020 -

Over a million children have developed some form of intellectual disability over the past two decades after being exposed to chemicals including flame retardants, pesticides, lead, and mercury, a study has revealed. More:


Child IQ in the U.S. Lowered by Exposure to Flame Retardants and Pesticides, Study Warns

Over a million children have developed some form of intellectual disability over the past two decades after being exposed to chemicals including flame retardants, pesticides, lead, and mercury, a study has revealed. More:

12/01/2020 -

Prenatal exposure to flame retardants may increase the risk of reading problems in young children, according to a new study at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York. More:


Prenatal Exposure to Flame Retardants May Affect Brain’s Reading Network in Kids

Prenatal exposure to flame retardants may increase the risk of reading problems in young children, according to a new study at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York. More:

07/01/2020 -

Tommy Joyce is no cinephile. But there's a film that's attracting a lot of attention in his community. "Dark Waters" — a legal thriller — tells the epic story of the DuPont corporation's failure to inform residents of the Mid-Ohio Valley of the considerable health risks of a perfluoroalkyl substance [PFAS] called perfluorooctanoic acid, or C8, for its chain of eight carbons. More:


A lasting legacy: DuPont, C8 contamination and the community of Parkersburg left to grapple with the consequences

Tommy Joyce is no cinephile. But there's a film that's attracting a lot of attention in his community. "Dark Waters" — a legal thriller — tells the epic story of the DuPont corporation's failure to inform residents of the Mid-Ohio Valley of the considerable health risks of a perfluoroalkyl substance [PFAS] called perfluorooctanoic acid, or C8, for its chain of eight carbons. More:

02/01/2020 -

I'm the founder and chief scientist of Environmental Health Sciences, a nonprofit in Virginia that publishes Environmental Health News and engages in scientific research and outreach to help the public and policy makers understand that we have many opportunities to prevent diseases and disabilities that are afflicting our families, friends and neighbors today. More:

Documentary Resources Endocrine disruption

Looking ahead: Hormone-altering chemicals threaten our health, finances and future

I'm the founder and chief scientist of Environmental Health Sciences, a nonprofit in Virginia that publishes Environmental Health News and engages in scientific research and outreach to help the public and policy makers understand that we have many opportunities to prevent diseases and disabilities that are afflicting our families, friends and neighbors today. More:

Documentary Resources Endocrine disruption
31/12/2019 -

Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) were outlawed in the 1970s after it was found they can cause cancer and damage the environment. Despite efforts to eliminate all traces of the potent chemicals, POPs remain in the food chain today – mainly in dairy, meat and fish. Researchers found women who were exposed to high levels of POPs in pregnancy went on to have smaller foetuses. More:


Mothers-to-be exposed to toxic chemicals hidden in meat, dairy and fish which were BANNED in the 1970s 'have smaller babies'

Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) were outlawed in the 1970s after it was found they can cause cancer and damage the environment. Despite efforts to eliminate all traces of the potent chemicals, POPs remain in the food chain today – mainly in dairy, meat and fish. Researchers found women who were exposed to high levels of POPs in pregnancy went on to have smaller foetuses. More:

23/12/2019 -

In 2019, about 60 percent of sewage sludge from 16,000 wastewater processing facilities in more than 160 U.S. cities has been spread on our soils – farmland and gardens, as well as schoolyards and lawns. More:


Op-ed: Yes, food is grown in sewage waste. That’s a problem

In 2019, about 60 percent of sewage sludge from 16,000 wastewater processing facilities in more than 160 U.S. cities has been spread on our soils – farmland and gardens, as well as schoolyards and lawns. More:

19/12/2019 -

Environmental officials from Sweden, the Netherlands, Germany, and Denmark today announced a plan to restrict all PFAS compounds under Europe’s chemical regulations framework. The announcement in Brussels came one day after the submission of a document to the European Commission that lays out a strategy to phase out most uses of PFAS compounds by 2030, and one week after the commission proposed a drinking water standard for the entire class of chemicals. More:


European countries announce plan to phase out toxic PFAS chemicals by 2030

Environmental officials from Sweden, the Netherlands, Germany, and Denmark today announced a plan to restrict all PFAS compounds under Europe’s chemical regulations framework. The announcement in Brussels came one day after the submission of a document to the European Commission that lays out a strategy to phase out most uses of PFAS compounds by 2030, and one week after the commission proposed a drinking water standard for the entire class of chemicals. More:

19/12/2019 -

Why are endocrine-disrupting chemicals different from other toxic exposures? In these videos, you will learn about how chemicals interfere with hormone biology and endocrine systems, and how principles of endocrinology can be applied to toxic chemical exposures. More:


An Introduction to Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals

Why are endocrine-disrupting chemicals different from other toxic exposures? In these videos, you will learn about how chemicals interfere with hormone biology and endocrine systems, and how principles of endocrinology can be applied to toxic chemical exposures. More:

17/12/2019 -

New data shows that rainwater in some parts of the US contains high enough levels of potentially toxic per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) to possibly affect human health and may, if found in drinking water, in some cases be high enough to trigger regulatory action. More:

Monitoring & Exposure


Rainwater in parts of US contains high levels of PFAS chemical, says study

New data shows that rainwater in some parts of the US contains high enough levels of potentially toxic per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) to possibly affect human health and may, if found in drinking water, in some cases be high enough to trigger regulatory action. More:

Monitoring & Exposure

12/12/2019 -

Lansing became the first city in Michigan to send its PFAS-based fire-fighting foam to a hazardous waste landfill. Stacks of five-gallon buckets, totaling 1,260 gallons and some dating back from at least decade ago, were carted to trucks operated by US Ecology.More:


Disposal begins for Michigan’s fire-fighting foam containing PFAS

Lansing became the first city in Michigan to send its PFAS-based fire-fighting foam to a hazardous waste landfill. Stacks of five-gallon buckets, totaling 1,260 gallons and some dating back from at least decade ago, were carted to trucks operated by US Ecology.More:

12/12/2019 -

People and the environment are exposed to a wide variety of extremely persistent chemicals known as PFAS, many of which are known to be toxic. A briefing by the European Environment Agency presents an overview of these chemicals, which continue to accumulate in people and the environment. More:


PFAS pollution is widespread in Europe but risks are still poorly understood

People and the environment are exposed to a wide variety of extremely persistent chemicals known as PFAS, many of which are known to be toxic. A briefing by the European Environment Agency presents an overview of these chemicals, which continue to accumulate in people and the environment. More:

10/12/2019 -

They’re a family of chemicals famous enough to have a Hollywood movie made about them. They are also known to cause cancer, thyroid problems and other serious health issues. And worryingly for environmental justice advocates and disadvantaged communities, growing data highlighting the per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) problem nationally and in California suggest that the impact may be hardest felt by those on the lower rungs of the economic ladder. More:

Research on PFAS

Topic of Cancer: How PFAS Threaten Our Water

They’re a family of chemicals famous enough to have a Hollywood movie made about them. They are also known to cause cancer, thyroid problems and other serious health issues. And worryingly for environmental justice advocates and disadvantaged communities, growing data highlighting the per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) problem nationally and in California suggest that the impact may be hardest felt by those on the lower rungs of the economic ladder. More:

Research on PFAS
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