POPs in the news

08/07/2020 -

Chemical pollutants mean bad news for the environment, but some types are far more harmful than others. At the extreme end of the spectrum are toxic substances such as PFAS and GenX ,which fall into a class known as “forever chemicals” for their ability to endure in the environment for a very long time. Rice University researchers have happened upon a powerful new tool they say could help neutralize this threat, offering a new catalyst that can destroy them in a matter of hours. More:


Boron nitride catalyst destroys toxic PFAS "forever chemicals"

Chemical pollutants mean bad news for the environment, but some types are far more harmful than others. At the extreme end of the spectrum are toxic substances such as PFAS and GenX ,which fall into a class known as “forever chemicals” for their ability to endure in the environment for a very long time. Rice University researchers have happened upon a powerful new tool they say could help neutralize this threat, offering a new catalyst that can destroy them in a matter of hours. More:

06/07/2020 -

In 2014, my world changed forever when I learned my family was exposed to contaminated drinking water containing high levels of PFAS. Since then, I haven't stopped worrying about my family's health," says Andrea Amico, a New Hampshire resident and PFAS community advocate turned national activist. More:

Human Health Effects PFAS management PFAS-Free products

Op-ed: PFAS chemicals—the other immune system threat

In 2014, my world changed forever when I learned my family was exposed to contaminated drinking water containing high levels of PFAS. Since then, I haven't stopped worrying about my family's health," says Andrea Amico, a New Hampshire resident and PFAS community advocate turned national activist. More:

Human Health Effects PFAS management PFAS-Free products
03/07/2020 -

Exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals in medicine and medical devices is grossly underestimated, and physicians have an ethical obligation to talk about these exposures with their patients, according to a new study. More:


The danger of hormone-mimicking chemicals in medical devices and meds

Exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals in medicine and medical devices is grossly underestimated, and physicians have an ethical obligation to talk about these exposures with their patients, according to a new study. More:

02/07/2020 -

Contrary to the Biblical adage, we do not necessarily reap what we sow. As researchers specializing in plant pathology and entomology, we have devoted our careers to understanding and managing plant pests and pathogens. We are also gardeners with varying levels of experience and have seen firsthand the damage these insects and disease-causing agents can inflict. More:


How to manage plant pests and diseases in your victory garden

Contrary to the Biblical adage, we do not necessarily reap what we sow. As researchers specializing in plant pathology and entomology, we have devoted our careers to understanding and managing plant pests and pathogens. We are also gardeners with varying levels of experience and have seen firsthand the damage these insects and disease-causing agents can inflict. More:

01/07/2020 -

Firefighters face dangers beyond the blaze itself. Their work subjects them to carcinogens from burning materials, as well as toxic per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) from flame-suppressing foams. A new study finds that firefighters can also be exposed to PFAS over time through another source: their protective clothing. More:


Protective gear could expose firefighters to PFAS

Firefighters face dangers beyond the blaze itself. Their work subjects them to carcinogens from burning materials, as well as toxic per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) from flame-suppressing foams. A new study finds that firefighters can also be exposed to PFAS over time through another source: their protective clothing. More:

28/06/2020 -

This year, 2020, marks the 50th anniversary of the International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (icipe). Icipe was founded in 1970 by the late Kenyan scientist, Prof. Thomas Risley Odhiambo. This was at a time when the very notion that insect science – or indeed, the then woefully small indigenous African scientific communities – could contribute to a prosperous future for Africa, must have seemed audacious to say the least. More:


A brief history of icipe@50

This year, 2020, marks the 50th anniversary of the International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology (icipe). Icipe was founded in 1970 by the late Kenyan scientist, Prof. Thomas Risley Odhiambo. This was at a time when the very notion that insect science – or indeed, the then woefully small indigenous African scientific communities – could contribute to a prosperous future for Africa, must have seemed audacious to say the least. More:

26/06/2020 -

Scientists have even managed to measure the precise harm that a single microgram/cubic meter increase in air pollution has on a population, which, according to researchers from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, is “an 8% increase in mortality from COVID-19.” More:


Scientists pin blame for some coronavirus deaths on air pollution, PFAS, and other chemicals

Scientists have even managed to measure the precise harm that a single microgram/cubic meter increase in air pollution has on a population, which, according to researchers from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, is “an 8% increase in mortality from COVID-19.” More:

11/06/2020 -

A new study has identified a possible link between exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and celiac disease in young people. More:


Chemical pollutant exposure linked to celiac disease in young people

A new study has identified a possible link between exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and celiac disease in young people. More:

10/06/2020 -

A new study reveals that polybrominated biphenyl-153 (PBB-153) — a flame retardant present in older consumer products, which has been banned since 1976 — may cause serious birth defects by altering the genetic code in sperm. The new study into this common household chemical raises questions about the present-day consequences of corporate malfeasance nearly half a century ago. More:


A flame retardant commonly found in vintage furniture may be affecting human sperm

A new study reveals that polybrominated biphenyl-153 (PBB-153) — a flame retardant present in older consumer products, which has been banned since 1976 — may cause serious birth defects by altering the genetic code in sperm. The new study into this common household chemical raises questions about the present-day consequences of corporate malfeasance nearly half a century ago. More:

10/06/2020 -

More than 10,000 years of domestication have made dogs strikingly similar to humans, from their ability to read facial our expressions to our closely related genomes. Now, a new study reveals that dogs and humans carry the same toxic chemicals in their bodies—a discovery that could possibly improve human health. More:


Dogs can be 'early-warning systems' for toxic chemical exposure at home

More than 10,000 years of domestication have made dogs strikingly similar to humans, from their ability to read facial our expressions to our closely related genomes. Now, a new study reveals that dogs and humans carry the same toxic chemicals in their bodies—a discovery that could possibly improve human health. More:

08/06/2020 -

The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection has officially published its adoption of stringent, health-based drinking water standards for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), chemicals that are extremely persistent in the environment and have been linked to various health problems in people. More:


New Jersey Adopts Strict Drinking Water Standards for PFOA and PFOS

The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection has officially published its adoption of stringent, health-based drinking water standards for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), chemicals that are extremely persistent in the environment and have been linked to various health problems in people. More:

04/06/2020 -

The challenge was to identify the new compound. Because the company didn’t reveal the chemistry of the replacement — in fact had kept its details purposefully obscured on the grounds that it was confidential business information — the scientists had to resort to expensive, painstaking detective work to figure out what chemical the company was now using and whether they were releasing it into the environment. More:


New PFAS Chemical Contamination Discovered in New Jersey

The challenge was to identify the new compound. Because the company didn’t reveal the chemistry of the replacement — in fact had kept its details purposefully obscured on the grounds that it was confidential business information — the scientists had to resort to expensive, painstaking detective work to figure out what chemical the company was now using and whether they were releasing it into the environment. More:

04/06/2020 -

Their latest win came in March, when the EU executive vowed “to address the unnecessary and unwanted use of chemicals” in products. The announcement was part of the Circular Economy Action Plan, known as the bloc’s masterplan for safer, longer lasting, and recyclable products. More:


Old Flames: The Quest to ban toxic retardants heats up

Their latest win came in March, when the EU executive vowed “to address the unnecessary and unwanted use of chemicals” in products. The announcement was part of the Circular Economy Action Plan, known as the bloc’s masterplan for safer, longer lasting, and recyclable products. More:

28/05/2020 -

Infectious disease experts, scientists, and doctors have warned about the potential for a pandemic for years. Similar to those who cautioned us about a disease like COVID-19, leading public health experts, scientists, and doctors today warn us that exposure to toxic chemicals is contributing to rates of chronic illnesses. And many of these illnesses worsen the impacts of COVID-19. More:


Listen to experts and tackle the toxic chemical crisis contributing to chronic disease

Infectious disease experts, scientists, and doctors have warned about the potential for a pandemic for years. Similar to those who cautioned us about a disease like COVID-19, leading public health experts, scientists, and doctors today warn us that exposure to toxic chemicals is contributing to rates of chronic illnesses. And many of these illnesses worsen the impacts of COVID-19. More:

28/05/2020 -

First, there was DDT. Then came BPA. The latest chemical acronym to become a household name is PFAS, short for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances. The chemicals in this class are valued as strong surfactants and for their ability to repel water, grease, and stains. Among other uses, PFAS are added to paper products designed to hold hot, greasy foods. A recent study in Environmental Health Perspectives delves into how such foods might contribute to people’s exposures to PFAS. More:


PFAS in Food Packaging: A Hot, Greasy Exposure

First, there was DDT. Then came BPA. The latest chemical acronym to become a household name is PFAS, short for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances. The chemicals in this class are valued as strong surfactants and for their ability to repel water, grease, and stains. Among other uses, PFAS are added to paper products designed to hold hot, greasy foods. A recent study in Environmental Health Perspectives delves into how such foods might contribute to people’s exposures to PFAS. More:

28/05/2020 -

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS, are a class of synthetic compounds used in a variety of industrial processes and found in dozens of household items. Previous studies have linked the toxins with a variety of health problems, including cancer and high cholesterol. Winds can carry PFAS pollution several miles away from manufacturing facilities, according to a new study. More:


Wind can carry PFAS pollution miles away from manufacturing facilities

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS, are a class of synthetic compounds used in a variety of industrial processes and found in dozens of household items. Previous studies have linked the toxins with a variety of health problems, including cancer and high cholesterol. Winds can carry PFAS pollution several miles away from manufacturing facilities, according to a new study. More:

18/05/2020 -

The foams, dubbed aqueous film-forming foam (AFFF), were a boon to firefighters. Special perfluorinated chemicals gave AFFF unique hydrophobic and surfactant properties, allowing it to rapidly seal over burning fuel and prevent reignition once a blaze had been extinguished. By the 1970s, AFFF was in use at most military bases, airports, refineries, and many civilian fire departments around the world. More:


PFAS-free firefighting foams: Are they safer?

The foams, dubbed aqueous film-forming foam (AFFF), were a boon to firefighters. Special perfluorinated chemicals gave AFFF unique hydrophobic and surfactant properties, allowing it to rapidly seal over burning fuel and prevent reignition once a blaze had been extinguished. By the 1970s, AFFF was in use at most military bases, airports, refineries, and many civilian fire departments around the world. More:

14/05/2020 -

Substances used for air conditioning in almost all new cars are building up in the environment and may pose a threat to human health, researchers say. More:


Ozone layer: Concern grows over threat from replacement chemicals

Substances used for air conditioning in almost all new cars are building up in the environment and may pose a threat to human health, researchers say. More:

13/05/2020 -

It seems like everyone knows someone with a sensitivity to gluten — a protein mixture found in cereal grains, like wheat and barley. A third of all Americans say they avoid products with gluten in them, and grocery store shelves are overflowing with gluten-free products that didn’t exist a decade ago. More:


Can’t eat gluten? Pesticides and nonstick pans might have something to do with it, study says

It seems like everyone knows someone with a sensitivity to gluten — a protein mixture found in cereal grains, like wheat and barley. A third of all Americans say they avoid products with gluten in them, and grocery store shelves are overflowing with gluten-free products that didn’t exist a decade ago. More:

06/05/2020 -

Manila, Philippines—Environmental rights group EcoWaste Coalition is calling on the government to revamp the country’s recycling protocols after an international study found the presence of highly toxic chemicals in some toys made of recycled plastics, particularly those from electronic waste (e-waste). More:


EcoWaste to govt, industry: Remove toxic chemicals in recycled plastic toys

Manila, Philippines—Environmental rights group EcoWaste Coalition is calling on the government to revamp the country’s recycling protocols after an international study found the presence of highly toxic chemicals in some toys made of recycled plastics, particularly those from electronic waste (e-waste). More:

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