POPs in the news

24/03/2020 -

Female firefighters in San Francisco have higher concentrations of certain cancer-linked chemicals in their blood than women in other occupations, according to the first study to investigate how women in the profession are exposed to chemicals in the line of duty. Chemicals called PFAS were found in high levels in the first study of female firefighter health. More:


Female firefighters exposed to cancer-linked chemicals

Female firefighters in San Francisco have higher concentrations of certain cancer-linked chemicals in their blood than women in other occupations, according to the first study to investigate how women in the profession are exposed to chemicals in the line of duty. Chemicals called PFAS were found in high levels in the first study of female firefighter health. More:

24/03/2020 -

In May 2018 in Fayetteville, North Carolina, D'Anthony Brown sets up fishing poles at the William O Huske Dam. This is the dam closest to the Chemours plant, which manufactures products containing PFAS chemicals. Chemours has been accused of polluting the water supplies of cities downriver. More:


Toxic ‘forever chemicals’ flow freely through this river—and now its fish

In May 2018 in Fayetteville, North Carolina, D'Anthony Brown sets up fishing poles at the William O Huske Dam. This is the dam closest to the Chemours plant, which manufactures products containing PFAS chemicals. Chemours has been accused of polluting the water supplies of cities downriver. More:

19/03/2020 -

A fluorinated gel can capture a larger proportion of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) from contaminated water than currently available techniques. More:


Fluorinated gel grabs PFAS

A fluorinated gel can capture a larger proportion of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) from contaminated water than currently available techniques. More:

18/03/2020 -

More than 50 years ago, scientists at the Permanente Foundation Hospital in Oakland started a simple experiment: When a pregnant woman would come in for routine maternal care, they were asked to give a sample of blood, to be frozen for future research. They didn’t know it at the time, but those samples would later be key in understanding the long-term health impacts of the then widely-used pesticide DDT. More:


DDT’s toxic legacy could span three generations

More than 50 years ago, scientists at the Permanente Foundation Hospital in Oakland started a simple experiment: When a pregnant woman would come in for routine maternal care, they were asked to give a sample of blood, to be frozen for future research. They didn’t know it at the time, but those samples would later be key in understanding the long-term health impacts of the then widely-used pesticide DDT. More:

03/03/2020 -

Chlorinated paraffins (CPs) have been produced for a wide range of applications, mostly in open uses, such as metalworking fluids, lubricants, coolants or additives in consumer goods. The production volume is more than one million tonnes requiring control of the lifecycle of these persistent and bioaccumulative chemicals. In May 2017, the Stockholm Convention amended its Annex A to list short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) as a Persistent Organic Pollutant (POP). More:


Chlorinated paraffins in the technosphere: A review of available information and data gaps demonstrating the need to support the Stockholm Convention implementation

Chlorinated paraffins (CPs) have been produced for a wide range of applications, mostly in open uses, such as metalworking fluids, lubricants, coolants or additives in consumer goods. The production volume is more than one million tonnes requiring control of the lifecycle of these persistent and bioaccumulative chemicals. In May 2017, the Stockholm Convention amended its Annex A to list short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) as a Persistent Organic Pollutant (POP). More:

03/03/2020 -

Harmful chemicals in food packaging and other food contact materials can pose considerable risk to our health, according to a review of more than 1,200 peer-reviewed studies. The report's authors—33 scientists from around the globe—urged lawmakers to take swift action to reduce exposure. The problem, they said, is particularly acute for recycled materials and plastics alternatives promoted as more environmentally friendly in response to plastic pollution concerns. More:


Food packaging can harm human health

Harmful chemicals in food packaging and other food contact materials can pose considerable risk to our health, according to a review of more than 1,200 peer-reviewed studies. The report's authors—33 scientists from around the globe—urged lawmakers to take swift action to reduce exposure. The problem, they said, is particularly acute for recycled materials and plastics alternatives promoted as more environmentally friendly in response to plastic pollution concerns. More:

27/02/2020 -

But first, let's thank European supermarket chain Lidl for trying. We all must. Plastic pollution is an enormous challenge. Unfortunately they, like many, are ignoring the toxic dimension of plastic recycling. Until efforts to solve the plastic crisis fully understand plastic toxicity, they risk making today's solutions into tomorrow's problems. And not just tomorrow's minor problems—we're talking societal-disruption and extinction-scale problems. More:


Ocean plastic: How recycling creates tomorrow’s problems

But first, let's thank European supermarket chain Lidl for trying. We all must. Plastic pollution is an enormous challenge. Unfortunately they, like many, are ignoring the toxic dimension of plastic recycling. Until efforts to solve the plastic crisis fully understand plastic toxicity, they risk making today's solutions into tomorrow's problems. And not just tomorrow's minor problems—we're talking societal-disruption and extinction-scale problems. More:

13/02/2020 -

The billion-dollar companies that made and used chemicals now popping up in water supplies around the country are switching to newer alternatives, but they haven’t escaped liabilities for historic environmental contamination. More:


Creating ‘Forever Chemicals': A Guide to PFAS Companies (2)

The billion-dollar companies that made and used chemicals now popping up in water supplies around the country are switching to newer alternatives, but they haven’t escaped liabilities for historic environmental contamination. More:

02/02/2020 -

Health and environmental concerns certainly played a role in the decision to ban the highly fluorinated waxes, which contain toxic synthetics commonly known as PFAS. But so did another factor: That some teams enjoy a competitive advantage by having greater financial resources to obtain the waxes. More:


Ski wax linked to forever chemicals – and a ‘dirty secret’ – to be banned

Health and environmental concerns certainly played a role in the decision to ban the highly fluorinated waxes, which contain toxic synthetics commonly known as PFAS. But so did another factor: That some teams enjoy a competitive advantage by having greater financial resources to obtain the waxes. More:

29/01/2020 -

Harmful levels of long-banned chemicals, including the pesticide DDT, have been found in the tissues of two vulnerable dolphin species swimming in waters flowing into the Great Barrier Reef. More:


DDT and other banned chemicals pose threat to vulnerable dolphins on Great Barrier Reef

Harmful levels of long-banned chemicals, including the pesticide DDT, have been found in the tissues of two vulnerable dolphin species swimming in waters flowing into the Great Barrier Reef. More:

29/01/2020 -

Drinking water has long been at the center of city health and environment debates as utilities and public works departments face pressure to keep the basic necessity safe for residents. A lack of [US] federal regulations has left cities scrambling to understand the health risks of PFAS and the most cost-effective ways to get it out of drinking water. More:

Case Study Report

The cost and confusion of cleaning PFAS contamination

Drinking water has long been at the center of city health and environment debates as utilities and public works departments face pressure to keep the basic necessity safe for residents. A lack of [US] federal regulations has left cities scrambling to understand the health risks of PFAS and the most cost-effective ways to get it out of drinking water. More:

Case Study Report
28/01/2020 -

Yet, we are hit daily with news about health epidemics that affect human populations: obesity rates continue to climb; more than a million new cancer cases are diagnosed in the US each year; one in every six American children has a developmental disability, and one in 59 have autism spectrum disorder. Many of these conditions are linked to hormones and endocrine health. More:


Vandenberg, Trasande, Sargis: Understanding endocrine disruptors

Yet, we are hit daily with news about health epidemics that affect human populations: obesity rates continue to climb; more than a million new cancer cases are diagnosed in the US each year; one in every six American children has a developmental disability, and one in 59 have autism spectrum disorder. Many of these conditions are linked to hormones and endocrine health. More:

24/01/2020 -

Fluorinated glide wax is being banned from elite competitions, and big brands like Swix say they’re searching for environmentally friendly alternatives. But the seductively speedy—and noxious—compounds are unlikely to loosen their grip on the sport anytime soon. More:


Nordic Skiing Has an Addiction to Toxic Wax

Fluorinated glide wax is being banned from elite competitions, and big brands like Swix say they’re searching for environmentally friendly alternatives. But the seductively speedy—and noxious—compounds are unlikely to loosen their grip on the sport anytime soon. More:

22/01/2020 -

The European Union (EU) has taken an important step towards cleaning up its recycling; it will no longer allow materials containing a class of toxic, globally banned flame retardants known as PBDEs to be recycled. More:


EU Withdraws its Toxic Recycling Exemption

The European Union (EU) has taken an important step towards cleaning up its recycling; it will no longer allow materials containing a class of toxic, globally banned flame retardants known as PBDEs to be recycled. More:

15/01/2020 -

On the day Susan Gordon learned Venetucci Farm, in Colorado, was contaminated, the vegetables looked just as good as ever, the grass as green, and the cattle, hogs, chickens, and goats as healthy. The beauty of the community farm she and her husband managed made the revelation all the more tragic. Chemicals known as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, invisible and insidious, had tainted the groundwater beneath her feet. More:

Exposure to PFAS Destruction technology

Scientists Fight Back Against Toxic ‘Forever’ Chemicals

On the day Susan Gordon learned Venetucci Farm, in Colorado, was contaminated, the vegetables looked just as good as ever, the grass as green, and the cattle, hogs, chickens, and goats as healthy. The beauty of the community farm she and her husband managed made the revelation all the more tragic. Chemicals known as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, invisible and insidious, had tainted the groundwater beneath her feet. More:

Exposure to PFAS Destruction technology
14/01/2020 -

Over a million children have developed some form of intellectual disability over the past two decades after being exposed to chemicals including flame retardants, pesticides, lead, and mercury, a study has revealed. More:


Child IQ in the U.S. Lowered by Exposure to Flame Retardants and Pesticides, Study Warns

Over a million children have developed some form of intellectual disability over the past two decades after being exposed to chemicals including flame retardants, pesticides, lead, and mercury, a study has revealed. More:

12/01/2020 -

Prenatal exposure to flame retardants may increase the risk of reading problems in young children, according to a new study at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York. More:


Prenatal Exposure to Flame Retardants May Affect Brain’s Reading Network in Kids

Prenatal exposure to flame retardants may increase the risk of reading problems in young children, according to a new study at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York. More:

07/01/2020 -

Tommy Joyce is no cinephile. But there's a film that's attracting a lot of attention in his community. "Dark Waters" — a legal thriller — tells the epic story of the DuPont corporation's failure to inform residents of the Mid-Ohio Valley of the considerable health risks of a perfluoroalkyl substance [PFAS] called perfluorooctanoic acid, or C8, for its chain of eight carbons. More:


A lasting legacy: DuPont, C8 contamination and the community of Parkersburg left to grapple with the consequences

Tommy Joyce is no cinephile. But there's a film that's attracting a lot of attention in his community. "Dark Waters" — a legal thriller — tells the epic story of the DuPont corporation's failure to inform residents of the Mid-Ohio Valley of the considerable health risks of a perfluoroalkyl substance [PFAS] called perfluorooctanoic acid, or C8, for its chain of eight carbons. More:

02/01/2020 -

I'm the founder and chief scientist of Environmental Health Sciences, a nonprofit in Virginia that publishes Environmental Health News and engages in scientific research and outreach to help the public and policy makers understand that we have many opportunities to prevent diseases and disabilities that are afflicting our families, friends and neighbors today. More:

Documentary Resources Endocrine disruption

Looking ahead: Hormone-altering chemicals threaten our health, finances and future

I'm the founder and chief scientist of Environmental Health Sciences, a nonprofit in Virginia that publishes Environmental Health News and engages in scientific research and outreach to help the public and policy makers understand that we have many opportunities to prevent diseases and disabilities that are afflicting our families, friends and neighbors today. More:

Documentary Resources Endocrine disruption
31/12/2019 -

Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) were outlawed in the 1970s after it was found they can cause cancer and damage the environment. Despite efforts to eliminate all traces of the potent chemicals, POPs remain in the food chain today – mainly in dairy, meat and fish. Researchers found women who were exposed to high levels of POPs in pregnancy went on to have smaller foetuses. More:


Mothers-to-be exposed to toxic chemicals hidden in meat, dairy and fish which were BANNED in the 1970s 'have smaller babies'

Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) were outlawed in the 1970s after it was found they can cause cancer and damage the environment. Despite efforts to eliminate all traces of the potent chemicals, POPs remain in the food chain today – mainly in dairy, meat and fish. Researchers found women who were exposed to high levels of POPs in pregnancy went on to have smaller foetuses. More:

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