POPs in the news

07/08/2014 -

New testing shows low levels of a banned toxic chemical are still showing up in a variety of everyday products including paints, newspapers, magazines and cardboard food packaging. The tests found the compound at low levels in 49 different products, according to a report released by the The Washington Department of Ecology. More:
EarthFix


Report: Banned Toxic PCB Still Showing Up In Everyday Products

New testing shows low levels of a banned toxic chemical are still showing up in a variety of everyday products including paints, newspapers, magazines and cardboard food packaging. The tests found the compound at low levels in 49 different products, according to a report released by the The Washington Department of Ecology. More:
EarthFix

01/08/2014 -

Children from the Midwest involved in a prospective study are the third U.S. birth cohort to show strikingly consistent associations between prenatal exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants and impaired performance on neurodevelopment tests later in childhood. More:
Environmental Health Perspectives


More Evidence for PBDEs as Neurotoxicants: Cohort Study Corroborates Earlier Findings

Children from the Midwest involved in a prospective study are the third U.S. birth cohort to show strikingly consistent associations between prenatal exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants and impaired performance on neurodevelopment tests later in childhood. More:
Environmental Health Perspectives

25/07/2014 -

Vietnam will stop using all types of machinery and equipment containing polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), one of the persistent organic pollutants (POPs), by 2020 and safely dispose the substance by 2028.
VietNamNet - Viet Nam


Vietnam strives to eliminate persistent organic pollutants

Vietnam will stop using all types of machinery and equipment containing polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), one of the persistent organic pollutants (POPs), by 2020 and safely dispose the substance by 2028.
VietNamNet - Viet Nam

24/07/2014 -

The Agricultural Ministry has taken measures to control pesticides with a view to safeguard public health and the environment as the Ministry found that it is compulsory to change the act on pesticides to meet the modern day requirements. Organic fertilizer is suitable for the country's agriculture as Sri Lanka still practices traditional methods. More:
www.news.lk - Sri Lanka


Measures to control pesticides - Sri Lanka

The Agricultural Ministry has taken measures to control pesticides with a view to safeguard public health and the environment as the Ministry found that it is compulsory to change the act on pesticides to meet the modern day requirements. Organic fertilizer is suitable for the country's agriculture as Sri Lanka still practices traditional methods. More:
www.news.lk - Sri Lanka

22/07/2014 -

In all urban markets of Nepal, farmers are selling heavily poisoned vegetables and fruits. This is because of the overuse of insecticides and pesticides. And toxic chemicals are used to preserve fruits and vegetables during transportation and storage till they reach the consumers. More:
The Himalayan - Nepal


Unwarranted use of pesticides

In all urban markets of Nepal, farmers are selling heavily poisoned vegetables and fruits. This is because of the overuse of insecticides and pesticides. And toxic chemicals are used to preserve fruits and vegetables during transportation and storage till they reach the consumers. More:
The Himalayan - Nepal

13/07/2014 -

Birds are providing some insight into contamination in the Great Lakes. Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey are observing the nesting patterns of tree swallows along the banks of the lakes and are collecting blood from their babies to monitor levels of some toxins. More:
The Columbus Dispatch - USA


Scientists use birds to track pollution

Birds are providing some insight into contamination in the Great Lakes. Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey are observing the nesting patterns of tree swallows along the banks of the lakes and are collecting blood from their babies to monitor levels of some toxins. More:
The Columbus Dispatch - USA

10/07/2014 -

On June 13, 2014, the World Bank approved a US$ 8.10 million grant from the Global Environment Facility (GEF)* for Egypt’s “Sustainable Persistent Organic Pollutants Management Project (POPs)” More:
The World Bank


Egypt Takes Steps to Protect the Environment and Public Health

On June 13, 2014, the World Bank approved a US$ 8.10 million grant from the Global Environment Facility (GEF)* for Egypt’s “Sustainable Persistent Organic Pollutants Management Project (POPs)” More:
The World Bank

25/06/2014 -

When Penelope Jagessar Chaffer became pregnant, her obstetrician warned her to avoid alcohol, cigarettes and mercury-laden tuna. Dangers posed to her unborn child by industrial chemicals such as flame retardants, pesticides and plastics, however, never came up. Chaffer's prenatal care experience is more or less the norm, according to a national survey that gauged obstetricians' stances on counseling pregnant patients about environmental health hazards.More:
www.huffingtonpost.com


Doctors Fail To Counsel Pregnant Women On Toxic Chemical Risks

When Penelope Jagessar Chaffer became pregnant, her obstetrician warned her to avoid alcohol, cigarettes and mercury-laden tuna. Dangers posed to her unborn child by industrial chemicals such as flame retardants, pesticides and plastics, however, never came up. Chaffer's prenatal care experience is more or less the norm, according to a national survey that gauged obstetricians' stances on counseling pregnant patients about environmental health hazards.More:
www.huffingtonpost.com

25/06/2014 -

Tests on 125 consumer and children’s products show some manufacturers have replaced flame retardants banned in many products sold in Washington, with unregulated - but also potentially toxic - chemicals. A report containing test results is available. More:
Bonney Lake Courier-Hearld - USA


Some manufacturers replacing PBDEs with unregulated chemicals

Tests on 125 consumer and children’s products show some manufacturers have replaced flame retardants banned in many products sold in Washington, with unregulated - but also potentially toxic - chemicals. A report containing test results is available. More:
Bonney Lake Courier-Hearld - USA

27/01/2014 -

Researchers from Bavarian Health and Food Safety Authority in Germany have made a study of Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and “novel” brominated flame retardants in house dust.


Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and “novel” brominated flame retardants in house dust in Germany

 
27/01/2014 -

Researchers from Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences have made a study of development of PFOS and PFOA criteria for the protection of freshwater aquatic life in China.


Development of PFOS and PFOA criteria for the protection of freshwater aquatic life in China

 
24/10/2013 -

22/10/2013 - The Persistent Organic Pollutants Review Committee, a subsidiary body of the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs), recommended the inclusion of polychlorinated napththalenes (PCN) and hexachlorobutadiene (HCBD) to the UN-backed major treaty banning hazardous chemicals. Every human in the world carries in his or her body traces of POPs, which circulate globally through a process known as the “grasshopper effect” and include chemicals which are agents that that can kill people, damage the nervous and immune systems, cause cancer and reproductive disorders and interfere with normal infant and child development.


UN agencies urge end to potentially deadly – but preventable – lead paint use, recommend phase out of two industrial chemicals

 
19/09/2013 -

Shoppers spend over £10 billion on bananas annually and now this demand is being linked to the contamination of Central America's crocodilians. A research analyses blood samples from spectacled caiman in Costa Rica and finds that intensive pesticide use in plantations leads to contaminated species in protected conservation areas. More:
ScienceDaily


Are Banana Farms Contaminating Costa Rica's Crocs?

Shoppers spend over £10 billion on bananas annually and now this demand is being linked to the contamination of Central America's crocodilians. A research analyses blood samples from spectacled caiman in Costa Rica and finds that intensive pesticide use in plantations leads to contaminated species in protected conservation areas. More:
ScienceDaily

16/09/2013 -

To protect delicate eardrums, around 8 to 10 baleen whale species have ear canals that are naturally sealed off from the external environment. Over the years, earwax begins to build in the narrow tubes. Like tree rings, layers found within whale earplugs are already used to help researchers estimate an animal’s age. In this new study, scientists guessed that the wax may have more secrets to tell. More:
www.smithsonianmag.com


Blue Whale Earwax Reveals Pollution Accumulated Over a Lifetime

To protect delicate eardrums, around 8 to 10 baleen whale species have ear canals that are naturally sealed off from the external environment. Over the years, earwax begins to build in the narrow tubes. Like tree rings, layers found within whale earplugs are already used to help researchers estimate an animal’s age. In this new study, scientists guessed that the wax may have more secrets to tell. More:
www.smithsonianmag.com

15/09/2013 -

San Francisco - In the coastal redwood forests of central California, scientists trying to unravel the mystery surrounding the reproductive problems of dozens of endangered condors think they have uncovered the culprit: the long-banned pesticide DDT. More:
www.thecalifornian.com


Study: Rare condors harmed by pesticide

San Francisco - In the coastal redwood forests of central California, scientists trying to unravel the mystery surrounding the reproductive problems of dozens of endangered condors think they have uncovered the culprit: the long-banned pesticide DDT. More:
www.thecalifornian.com

11/09/2013 -

University researchers say they have developed a safer and cheaper way to clean up harmful contaminants from the ground after finishing a $1-million research project that spanned 13 years. The researchers with the University of Calgary and SAIT use rubbing alcohol and ultraviolet light to remove PCBs, or polychlorinated biphenyls, from affected soil. More:
Calgary Herald


Calgary researchers use rubbing alcohol, UV rays to clean up toxic PCBs

University researchers say they have developed a safer and cheaper way to clean up harmful contaminants from the ground after finishing a $1-million research project that spanned 13 years. The researchers with the University of Calgary and SAIT use rubbing alcohol and ultraviolet light to remove PCBs, or polychlorinated biphenyls, from affected soil. More:
Calgary Herald

28/08/2013 -

Montreal - Quebecers should be worried that it took 15 years for officials to clue into the fact that a Pointe-Claire company had a yard full of toxic materials, says one environmental expert, and the public should be demanding more transparency in the wake of the discovery. More:
www.montrealgazette.com
See also: PCB site in Pointe-Claire: Quebec’s environment minister approves Reliance’s plan for cleanup


Stash of PCBs shocks Pointe-Claire

Montreal - Quebecers should be worried that it took 15 years for officials to clue into the fact that a Pointe-Claire company had a yard full of toxic materials, says one environmental expert, and the public should be demanding more transparency in the wake of the discovery. More:
www.montrealgazette.com
See also: PCB site in Pointe-Claire: Quebec’s environment minister approves Reliance’s plan for cleanup

13/08/2013 -

Concentrations of 16 PBDEs, which are persistent, bioaccumulative, and may be toxic to both humans and the environment, were determined in dust samples from 33 New Zealand households and in breast milk samples from 33 mothers living in these households. More:
Massey University - New Zealand


Study shows links between dust and breast milk

Concentrations of 16 PBDEs, which are persistent, bioaccumulative, and may be toxic to both humans and the environment, were determined in dust samples from 33 New Zealand households and in breast milk samples from 33 mothers living in these households. More:
Massey University - New Zealand

05/08/2013 -

Washington, August 5, 2013 - Many developing countries import pesticides to increase agricultural production and control vector-borne diseases such as malaria. Over time, unused pesticides become obsolete and unsafe for use. Today, across Sub-Saharan Africa, more than 50,000 tons of obsolete pesticides litter the landscape. Exposure to these pollutants can cause cancer, allergies, reproductive disorders, and damages to the nervous and immune systems. More:
www.worldbank.org


Obsolete Pesticide Stockpiles: An Unwanted Legacy of the African Landscape

Washington, August 5, 2013 - Many developing countries import pesticides to increase agricultural production and control vector-borne diseases such as malaria. Over time, unused pesticides become obsolete and unsafe for use. Today, across Sub-Saharan Africa, more than 50,000 tons of obsolete pesticides litter the landscape. Exposure to these pollutants can cause cancer, allergies, reproductive disorders, and damages to the nervous and immune systems. More:
www.worldbank.org

30/07/2013 -

India is still reeling from the deaths of 23 schoolchildren in the village of Dharmasati Gandawa in Bihar on July 17 after they ate a free school lunch that was made with cooking oil tainted with the pesticide monocrotophos. The police say that the cooking oil might have been kept in a container that once held the pesticide. More:
The New York Times


Bihar School Deaths Highlight India’s Struggle With Pesticides

India is still reeling from the deaths of 23 schoolchildren in the village of Dharmasati Gandawa in Bihar on July 17 after they ate a free school lunch that was made with cooking oil tainted with the pesticide monocrotophos. The police say that the cooking oil might have been kept in a container that once held the pesticide. More:
The New York Times

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