POPs in the news

24/11/2021 -

Maryland sued Bayer AG seeking money to clean up environmental contamination in the state's waterways the state says is due to toxic chemicals the company's Monsanto Co unit made decades ago. the state said Monsanto, which Bayer acquired in 2018, knew as early as the 1930s that polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were toxic and lingered in the environment but continued to produce and sell them. More:


Maryland joins others in suing Bayer over PCB contamination

Maryland sued Bayer AG seeking money to clean up environmental contamination in the state's waterways the state says is due to toxic chemicals the company's Monsanto Co unit made decades ago. the state said Monsanto, which Bayer acquired in 2018, knew as early as the 1930s that polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were toxic and lingered in the environment but continued to produce and sell them. More:

23/11/2021 -

A new report indicates that toxic contaminants could be working their way up the food chain in several New Hampshire lakes. The Loon Preservation Committee found significant levels of a range of hard-to-detect toxic chemicals in failed loon eggs, including at Squam Lake, Lake Sunapee, Pleasant Lake and Grafton Pond, according to its report. More:


Report finds contaminants in loon eggs

A new report indicates that toxic contaminants could be working their way up the food chain in several New Hampshire lakes. The Loon Preservation Committee found significant levels of a range of hard-to-detect toxic chemicals in failed loon eggs, including at Squam Lake, Lake Sunapee, Pleasant Lake and Grafton Pond, according to its report. More:

23/11/2021 -

Last October, the White House outlined new and ongoing federal efforts to combat nationwide per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) pollution, especially agency actions to address the legacy of PFAS pollution in our water, air, food, and communities. We offer the Biden-Harris Administration seven recommendations to deal with PFAS in commerce using a whole-of-government approach, and finally start to turn off the PFAS tap. More:

PFAS: Environmental Justice PFAS: Chemicals Management

Analysis: 7 things the White House should do to limit PFAS pollution

Last October, the White House outlined new and ongoing federal efforts to combat nationwide per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) pollution, especially agency actions to address the legacy of PFAS pollution in our water, air, food, and communities. We offer the Biden-Harris Administration seven recommendations to deal with PFAS in commerce using a whole-of-government approach, and finally start to turn off the PFAS tap. More:

PFAS: Environmental Justice PFAS: Chemicals Management
22/11/2021 -

It’s one of the biggest industries in the world, consumes more than 10% of fossil fuels produced globally and emits an estimated 3.3 gigatons of greenhouse gas emissions a year, more than India’s annual emissions – yet the chemicals sector has largely slipped under the radar when it comes to climate. More:


How the chemicals industry’s pollution slipped under the radar

It’s one of the biggest industries in the world, consumes more than 10% of fossil fuels produced globally and emits an estimated 3.3 gigatons of greenhouse gas emissions a year, more than India’s annual emissions – yet the chemicals sector has largely slipped under the radar when it comes to climate. More:

17/11/2021 -

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a family of chemicals and can be found in all sorts of products, in the environment and in our bodies. PFAS  are man-made substances created by replacing hydrogen atoms (the natural bonding partner for carbon) with fluorine atoms.  This gives PFAS water and oil repellent properties. Once released into the environment, these PFAS cannot be broken down into carbon dioxide or methane by bacteria, enzymes, or sunlight, earning them the name of  ‘forever chemicals’. More:

What are PFAS PFAS pollution and accountability

Industry and Health - What are PFAS?

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a family of chemicals and can be found in all sorts of products, in the environment and in our bodies. PFAS  are man-made substances created by replacing hydrogen atoms (the natural bonding partner for carbon) with fluorine atoms.  This gives PFAS water and oil repellent properties. Once released into the environment, these PFAS cannot be broken down into carbon dioxide or methane by bacteria, enzymes, or sunlight, earning them the name of  ‘forever chemicals’. More:

What are PFAS PFAS pollution and accountability
16/11/2021 -

WASHINGTON – The Environmental Protection Agency announced that safe levels of exposure to PFAS – the levels at which harms might not occur – should be thousands of times lower than limits it first proposed in 2016. More:

PFAS Toxicity PFAS: The New Generation PFAS Exposure and Health Effects PFAS Regulation

EPA finds PFAS are more toxic than previously thought

WASHINGTON – The Environmental Protection Agency announced that safe levels of exposure to PFAS – the levels at which harms might not occur – should be thousands of times lower than limits it first proposed in 2016. More:

PFAS Toxicity PFAS: The New Generation PFAS Exposure and Health Effects PFAS Regulation
16/11/2021 -

Industrial facilities across the country could be unwittingly burning the Pentagon’s legacy firefighting foam, according to an analysis of Pentagon records. The firefighting foam is made with the toxic “forever chemicals” known as PFAS. More:

PFAS Contamination PFAS Disposal Issues PFAS Toxicity PFAS Environmental Transport PFAS Alternatives Issues PFAS Removal and Destruction Technologies

The Pentagon’s toxic ‘forever chemicals’ waste could be burning near your home

Industrial facilities across the country could be unwittingly burning the Pentagon’s legacy firefighting foam, according to an analysis of Pentagon records. The firefighting foam is made with the toxic “forever chemicals” known as PFAS. More:

PFAS Contamination PFAS Disposal Issues PFAS Toxicity PFAS Environmental Transport PFAS Alternatives Issues PFAS Removal and Destruction Technologies
16/11/2021 -

We are all surrounded by synthetic chemicals in our everyday lives - from pesticide residues in food to chemicals used in the manufacture of household products - but most of us are not aware that they also make their way into our bodies. Environmental journalist Anna Turns investigates her own 'chemical body burden' - the amount of persistent, synthetic pollutants that have accumulated inside her system. More:


Costing the Earth - My Toxic Cocktail

We are all surrounded by synthetic chemicals in our everyday lives - from pesticide residues in food to chemicals used in the manufacture of household products - but most of us are not aware that they also make their way into our bodies. Environmental journalist Anna Turns investigates her own 'chemical body burden' - the amount of persistent, synthetic pollutants that have accumulated inside her system. More:

15/11/2021 -

In June 2020, Kentucky’s Department for Environmental Protection sent an inspector to investigate a Teflon recycling company in western Kentucky. Four months later, state officials found forever chemicals in a creek that captures the facility’s runoff on its way to meet the Ohio River. More:

PFAS contamination and plastic recycling U.S. Superfund Sites Identified to have PFAS Contamination

PFAS pollution could last millennia. Ky. officials told the polluter, but not residents

In June 2020, Kentucky’s Department for Environmental Protection sent an inspector to investigate a Teflon recycling company in western Kentucky. Four months later, state officials found forever chemicals in a creek that captures the facility’s runoff on its way to meet the Ohio River. More:

PFAS contamination and plastic recycling U.S. Superfund Sites Identified to have PFAS Contamination
15/11/2021 -

BENNINGTON — In October, the state completed a multiyear, multimillion-dollar project to connect hundreds of homes to the Bennington municipal water system. The homes needed a new source of potable water after their private wells were found to be contaminated with the chemical PFOA. More:

PFOA soil and water contamination

Hundreds of Bennington-area residents connected to municipal water in $48.7 million response to PFOA contamination

BENNINGTON — In October, the state completed a multiyear, multimillion-dollar project to connect hundreds of homes to the Bennington municipal water system. The homes needed a new source of potable water after their private wells were found to be contaminated with the chemical PFOA. More:

PFOA soil and water contamination
03/11/2021 -

The scientific panel of Europe's food safety regulator called for a new, harder look at chemical safety standards. The new study, published last month in the European Food Safety Authority Journal, calls on regulators worldwide to consider "non-monotonic dose responses," or NMDRs – the non-intuitive notion that the dose does not always make the poison. More:


New Science: European regulators push for better safety standards

The scientific panel of Europe's food safety regulator called for a new, harder look at chemical safety standards. The new study, published last month in the European Food Safety Authority Journal, calls on regulators worldwide to consider "non-monotonic dose responses," or NMDRs – the non-intuitive notion that the dose does not always make the poison. More:

02/11/2021 -

If you live close to certain industrial facilities, you may have a higher estimated cancer risk. This may sound alarming. Here are answers to common questions, some crowdsourced tips and how to share your experience to help our investigation. More:

Industrial toxic releases and air pollution US EPA resources about industrial facilities and their toxic releases Risk screening and assessment

Can Air Pollution Cause Cancer? What You Need to Know About the Risks

If you live close to certain industrial facilities, you may have a higher estimated cancer risk. This may sound alarming. Here are answers to common questions, some crowdsourced tips and how to share your experience to help our investigation. More:

Industrial toxic releases and air pollution US EPA resources about industrial facilities and their toxic releases Risk screening and assessment
29/10/2021 -

The European Commission adopted a proposal to protect human health and the environment from some of the most harmful chemicals in waste – Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs). The Commission is proposing to introduce stringent limits for the following substances, or groups of substances, in waste: perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and its salts and related compounds; dicofol; and pentachlorophenol, its salts and esters – found in treated wood and textiles. More:


European Green Deal: Commission adopts new limits for some of the most harmful chemicals in waste

The European Commission adopted a proposal to protect human health and the environment from some of the most harmful chemicals in waste – Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs). The Commission is proposing to introduce stringent limits for the following substances, or groups of substances, in waste: perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and its salts and related compounds; dicofol; and pentachlorophenol, its salts and esters – found in treated wood and textiles. More:

29/10/2021 -

The Department of Defense may have failed to notify some of these farmers, as required by federal law, that toxic plumes of PFAS flowing from bases around the U.S. could be contaminating irrigation water, according to our review of DOD records. Studies show that irrigating crops and watering livestock with PFAS-contaminated water may contaminate the plants and animals. More:

Mapping the PFAS Contamination Crisis in the U.S PFAS in Food

Forever chemicals from military bases may be lurking in agricultural water supplies

The Department of Defense may have failed to notify some of these farmers, as required by federal law, that toxic plumes of PFAS flowing from bases around the U.S. could be contaminating irrigation water, according to our review of DOD records. Studies show that irrigating crops and watering livestock with PFAS-contaminated water may contaminate the plants and animals. More:

Mapping the PFAS Contamination Crisis in the U.S PFAS in Food
29/10/2021 -

Last year, the global chemical giant Bayer agreed to pay $650 million to settle the claims of 2,500 cities, counties, and ports for cleanup of contamination from polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, a notorious group of chlorinated chemicals that have long been linked to cancer and reproductive and immune system harms. More:

POPs Bioaccumulation PFAS chemicals, its uses and environmental impact

Op-ed: The ghosts in our water

Last year, the global chemical giant Bayer agreed to pay $650 million to settle the claims of 2,500 cities, counties, and ports for cleanup of contamination from polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, a notorious group of chlorinated chemicals that have long been linked to cancer and reproductive and immune system harms. More:

POPs Bioaccumulation PFAS chemicals, its uses and environmental impact
27/10/2021 -

The Environmental Protection Agency announced it is preparing a rule that would list some so-called "forever chemicals" as hazardous substances that must be eliminated from industrial waste before it is discarded. The chemicals are perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorobutane sulfonic acid (PFBS) and GenX. More:


EPA proposes regulating 'forever chemicals' under hazardous waste law

The Environmental Protection Agency announced it is preparing a rule that would list some so-called "forever chemicals" as hazardous substances that must be eliminated from industrial waste before it is discarded. The chemicals are perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorobutane sulfonic acid (PFBS) and GenX. More:

26/10/2021 -

Responding to a petition filed by New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham, EPA announced it will take two steps to address the risks posed by disposal of PFAS, the toxic chemicals contaminating the water supplies of thousands of communities around the U.S. More:

PFAS Health Effects PFAS Waste Disposal Issues

EPA moves closer to proper disposal of ‘forever chemicals’ wastes

Responding to a petition filed by New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham, EPA announced it will take two steps to address the risks posed by disposal of PFAS, the toxic chemicals contaminating the water supplies of thousands of communities around the U.S. More:

PFAS Health Effects PFAS Waste Disposal Issues
25/10/2021 -

WASHINGTON – The Environmental Protection Agency today announced that GenX, one of many “forever chemicals” known as PFAS, is hazardous at much lower exposures than the two notorious PFAS known as PFOA and PFOS. More:

Toxicity Assessments for GenX Chemicals

‘Forever chemical’ GenX more toxic than previously acknowledged, says EPA

WASHINGTON – The Environmental Protection Agency today announced that GenX, one of many “forever chemicals” known as PFAS, is hazardous at much lower exposures than the two notorious PFAS known as PFOA and PFOS. More:

Toxicity Assessments for GenX Chemicals
24/10/2021 -

Today, toxic per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are everywhere we’ve thought to look for them. As engineered, these synthetic chemicals glide through air and water with ease, evade all natural processes of decay, and inflict debilitating injuries even at exceedingly low levels of exposure. More:

PFAS: Environmental Contamination PFAS: Emissions and Testing PFAS Management Towards PFAS Regulation PFAS: Responsibility and Accountability PFAS in the Courtroom

Lethal ‘forever chemicals’ taint our food, water and even blood

Today, toxic per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are everywhere we’ve thought to look for them. As engineered, these synthetic chemicals glide through air and water with ease, evade all natural processes of decay, and inflict debilitating injuries even at exceedingly low levels of exposure. More:

PFAS: Environmental Contamination PFAS: Emissions and Testing PFAS Management Towards PFAS Regulation PFAS: Responsibility and Accountability PFAS in the Courtroom
20/10/2021 -

Ever wonder how your mascara or lipstick stays on all day? It might be that it contains PFAS, a class of chemicals used to make products water- and oil-resistant that are also found on Teflon nonstick pans and Gore-Tex waterproof clothing. Unfortunately, PFAS are linked to cancer and other serious health problems. More:

PFAS Human Health Effects PFAS in Articles and Products Companies Voluntary Action Towards PFAS Regulation

Makeup is full of toxic ‘forever chemicals.’ Why aren’t they banned?

Ever wonder how your mascara or lipstick stays on all day? It might be that it contains PFAS, a class of chemicals used to make products water- and oil-resistant that are also found on Teflon nonstick pans and Gore-Tex waterproof clothing. Unfortunately, PFAS are linked to cancer and other serious health problems. More:

PFAS Human Health Effects PFAS in Articles and Products Companies Voluntary Action Towards PFAS Regulation
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