POPs in the news

08/03/2022 -

Scientists in Kenya have discovered an organic way of protecting potatoes from the invasive and highly destructive potato cyst nematodes that attack planted seed causing major yield and financial losses. More:


Banana waste wrap could help save potatoes

Scientists in Kenya have discovered an organic way of protecting potatoes from the invasive and highly destructive potato cyst nematodes that attack planted seed causing major yield and financial losses. More:

08/03/2022 -

On 2 March, world leaders and environment ministers agreed to start negotiations on the world’s first legally binding international treaty to eliminate one of humanity’s most devastating sources of pollution: plastics. This hugely positive step has the power to attack the problem as never before. But to achieve this goal, science needs to be front and centre in the negotiations. More:


Landmark treaty on plastic pollution must put scientific evidence front and centre

On 2 March, world leaders and environment ministers agreed to start negotiations on the world’s first legally binding international treaty to eliminate one of humanity’s most devastating sources of pollution: plastics. This hugely positive step has the power to attack the problem as never before. But to achieve this goal, science needs to be front and centre in the negotiations. More:

07/03/2022 -

Toxic PFAS are often added into consumer products to make items stain- or water-resistant. But mounting evidence indicates that many products made without the intentional addition of PFAS are also contaminated. More:

PFAS in Food Packaging

Unintentional PFAS in products: A “jungle” of contamination

Toxic PFAS are often added into consumer products to make items stain- or water-resistant. But mounting evidence indicates that many products made without the intentional addition of PFAS are also contaminated. More:

PFAS in Food Packaging
04/03/2022 -

A tiny, poppy seed-sized particle of plastic might seem innocuous on its own. But when a speck of plastic is coupled with organic pollutants, the chemical makeup of that plastic can swell with toxicity. More:


Microplastics plus organic pollutants equals 10 times the toxicity, study finds

A tiny, poppy seed-sized particle of plastic might seem innocuous on its own. But when a speck of plastic is coupled with organic pollutants, the chemical makeup of that plastic can swell with toxicity. More:

03/03/2022 -

In front of the United Nations African headquarters in Nairobi, a 30-foot-high artwork featuring a faucet “spewing” a long stream of plastic waste dramatically illustrates the worsening flow of plastic fouling the world. Inside the main hall, 175 UN delegates took the first formal steps to turn off the tap. They agreed to negotiate the first comprehensive global treaty to curb plastic pollution—a move hailed as the most significant environmental agreement since the Paris climate accord in 2015. More:


The world’s nations agree to fix the plastic waste crisis

In front of the United Nations African headquarters in Nairobi, a 30-foot-high artwork featuring a faucet “spewing” a long stream of plastic waste dramatically illustrates the worsening flow of plastic fouling the world. Inside the main hall, 175 UN delegates took the first formal steps to turn off the tap. They agreed to negotiate the first comprehensive global treaty to curb plastic pollution—a move hailed as the most significant environmental agreement since the Paris climate accord in 2015. More:

03/03/2022 -

Five decades ago in an opera house in Stockholm Sweden, world leaders opened discussions that would lead to the creation of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). Since that meeting on 5 June 1972, UNEP has become the world's leading advocate for nature, using science, diplomacy and public outreach to counter a range of threats, from pollution to climate change. Here's a closer look at UNEP's work over the last 50 years and how it's helping to make the planet a more sustainable, equitable place. More:


50 years of environmental milestones

Five decades ago in an opera house in Stockholm Sweden, world leaders opened discussions that would lead to the creation of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). Since that meeting on 5 June 1972, UNEP has become the world's leading advocate for nature, using science, diplomacy and public outreach to counter a range of threats, from pollution to climate change. Here's a closer look at UNEP's work over the last 50 years and how it's helping to make the planet a more sustainable, equitable place. More:

03/03/2022 -

Plastic is a major source of greenhouse gas emissions, and the additives used to enhance this deceptively versatile material are often hazardous to human health. All the while, the plastics industry makes sure the demand – that they invented in the first place – keeps growing. Calling plastic the super-villain of chemical products is no exaggeration. But how did we end up in this dystopian tale? And what heroic measures can get us out of it? More:


Will plastic – the super-villain of chemical products – cause the climate and human health to snap?

Plastic is a major source of greenhouse gas emissions, and the additives used to enhance this deceptively versatile material are often hazardous to human health. All the while, the plastics industry makes sure the demand – that they invented in the first place – keeps growing. Calling plastic the super-villain of chemical products is no exaggeration. But how did we end up in this dystopian tale? And what heroic measures can get us out of it? More:

03/03/2022 -

For the first time, the international community has agreed on a framework to curb the world’s growing plastic problem. A resolution adopted Wednesday by the United Nations lays out an ambitious plan for developing a legally binding treaty to “end plastic pollution.” More:


U.N. adopts historic resolution aimed at ending plastic pollution

For the first time, the international community has agreed on a framework to curb the world’s growing plastic problem. A resolution adopted by the United Nations lays out an ambitious plan for developing a legally binding treaty to “end plastic pollution.” More:

02/03/2022 -

Why a new treaty? The world produces 400 million tonnes of plastic every year. Less than 10 per cent is being recycled and the rest ends up incinerated, dumped in a landfill or in the ocean and other ecosystems. With plastic production expected to double in the next 20 years, plastic pollution is also set to worsen. More:


A new global treaty to tackle plastic pollution?

Why a new treaty? The world produces 400 million tonnes of plastic every year. Less than 10 per cent is being recycled and the rest ends up incinerated, dumped in a landfill or in the ocean and other ecosystems. With plastic production expected to double in the next 20 years, plastic pollution is also set to worsen. More:

28/02/2022 -

Chemists and chemical engineers could certainly do more to align their molecular machinery with sustainable development. An obvious place to begin is in the classroom by transforming the way chemistry is taught. An international network of motivated teachers and educators are looking to do just that through promoting a concept deemed green and sustainable chemistry education. More:


Chemistry has much to learn from indigenous insights on sustainability

Chemists and chemical engineers could certainly do more to align their molecular machinery with sustainable development. An obvious place to begin is in the classroom by transforming the way chemistry is taught. An international network of motivated teachers and educators are looking to do just that through promoting a concept deemed green and sustainable chemistry education. More:

28/02/2022 -

Once called “the world’s parliament on the environment,” the UN Environment Assembly (UNEA) has a unique role in global environmental governance. UNEA is an initiator or catalyst. It identifies emerging issues and (hopefully) agrees to the next steps for learning about and addressing these issues. More:


The United Nations Environment Assembly’s Role as a Governance Architect

Once called “the world’s parliament on the environment,” the UN Environment Assembly (UNEA) has a unique role in global environmental governance. UNEA is an initiator or catalyst. It identifies emerging issues and (hopefully) agrees to the next steps for learning about and addressing these issues. More:

27/02/2022 -

PFAS, or per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, are a family of man-made chemicals used for their water- and stain-resistant qualities in products like clothing and carpet, nonstick cookware, packaging and firefighting foam. The family includes 5,000 compounds, which are persistent, remaining both in the environment and human body over time. More:


Here's what you should know about how to remove 'forever chemicals' from your drinking water

PFAS, or per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, are a family of man-made chemicals used for their water- and stain-resistant qualities in products like clothing and carpet, nonstick cookware, packaging and firefighting foam. The family includes 5,000 compounds, which are persistent, remaining both in the environment and human body over time. More:

23/02/2022 -

We’ve reached a tipping point – there are too many toxic chemicals in circulation for the world to handle! That’s the main conclusion from a recent study by some of the world’s foremost chemical scientists. Interview with one of the authors, Professor Bethanie Carney Almroth, to talk about the study and what we can do to turn this situation around. More:


A ChemSec Conversation – The planet can't handle any more toxic chemicals

We’ve reached a tipping point – there are too many toxic chemicals in circulation for the world to handle! That’s the main conclusion from a recent study by some of the world’s foremost chemical scientists. Interview with one of the authors, Professor Bethanie Carney Almroth, to talk about the study and what we can do to turn this situation around. More:

22/02/2022 -

The U.S. Geological Survey has detected the toxic “forever chemicals” known as PFAS in public and private drinking water wells in 16 Eastern states. PFAS were detected in public and private drinking water wells in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Maine, Mississippi, New Hampshire, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee and West Virginia. More:


USGS detects ‘forever chemicals’ in 16 states’ water wells

The U.S. Geological Survey has detected the toxic “forever chemicals” known as PFAS in public and private drinking water wells in 16 Eastern states. PFAS were detected in public and private drinking water wells in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Maine, Mississippi, New Hampshire, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee and West Virginia. More:

18/02/2022 -

Everyday levels of a pregnant woman’s exposure to mixtures of endocrine-disrupting chemicals like bisphenol A (BPA), phthalates, and per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), put their child at an increased risk of delayed language development, according to new research. More:


Prenatal exposure to toxics risks delay of child’s brain development

Everyday levels of a pregnant woman’s exposure to mixtures of endocrine-disrupting chemicals like bisphenol A (BPA), phthalates, and per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), put their child at an increased risk of delayed language development, according to new research. More:

17/02/2022 -

Whether it’s lead, phthalates, per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), or BPA, nearly every time scientists assess chemicals, they lower the thresholds for safety. Doses that were previously thought innocuous, we find, turn out harmful. Why does that happen? More:


BPA safety: The toxic chemical limbo game

Whether it’s lead, phthalates, per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), or BPA, nearly every time scientists assess chemicals, they lower the thresholds for safety. Doses that were previously thought innocuous, we find, turn out harmful. Why does that happen?. More:

16/02/2022 -

A new study found that in a marine environment, microplastics absorb and concentrate toxic organic substances and thus increase their toxicity by a factor of 10, which may lead to a severe impact on human health. More:


Microplastics increase the toxicity of organic pollutants in the environment by a factor of 10

A new study found that in a marine environment, microplastics absorb and concentrate toxic organic substances and thus increase their toxicity by a factor of 10, which may lead to a severe impact on human health. More:

16/02/2022 -

In Europe, scientists have blown the whistle on farmworkers' exposure to pesticides for years. Farm workers are not protected from pesticides. Their exposure has been linked to serious illnesses, including Parkinson’s disease and blood cancers. Recommended equipment, expensive, untested and rarely worn as it is, does not provide effective protection. Without this presumed protection, dangerous pesticides would be banned. More:

The Pesticide Cocktail Personal Protection Equipment Pesticides: Human Exposure Pesticides: Impact on Human Health

Poisoned farmers: exposing the myth of pesticide protection in Europe

In Europe, scientists have blown the whistle on farmworkers' exposure to pesticides for years. Farm workers are not protected from pesticides. Their exposure has been linked to serious illnesses, including Parkinson’s disease and blood cancers. Recommended equipment, expensive, untested and rarely worn as it is, does not provide effective protection. Without this presumed protection, dangerous pesticides would be banned. More:

The Pesticide Cocktail Personal Protection Equipment Pesticides: Human Exposure Pesticides: Impact on Human Health
15/02/2022 -

PFAS, or per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, are a family of man-made chemicals used for their water- and stain-resistant qualities in products like clothing and carpet, nonstick cookware, packaging and firefighting foam. The family includes 5,000 compounds, which are persistent, remaining both in the environment and human body over time. More:


Here's what you should know about how to remove 'forever chemicals' from your drinking water

PFAS, or per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, are a family of man-made chemicals used for their water- and stain-resistant qualities in products like clothing and carpet, nonstick cookware, packaging and firefighting foam. The family includes 5,000 compounds, which are persistent, remaining both in the environment and human body over time. More:

15/02/2022 -

PFAS are a group of manmade chemicals used in a vast number of consumer and industrial products. They’re often referred to as “forever chemicals,” because most don’t break down. Use this guide to understand PFAS and how to limit your exposure. More:

PFAS Body Burden and Health Impact PFAS Toxicity PFAS in Water PFAS in Consumer Products PFAS in Cosmetics PFAS in Industrial and Military Discharges Phasing out PFAS

What are PFAS? Everything you need to know about “forever chemicals” and how to avoid them

PFAS are a group of manmade chemicals used in a vast number of consumer and industrial products. They’re often referred to as “forever chemicals,” because most don’t break down. Use this guide to understand PFAS and how to limit your exposure. More:

PFAS Body Burden and Health Impact PFAS Toxicity PFAS in Water PFAS in Consumer Products PFAS in Cosmetics PFAS in Industrial and Military Discharges Phasing out PFAS
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