POPs in the news

21/06/2010 -

High levels of brominated flame retardants can alter pregnant women’s thyroid hormones, which are critical to a baby’s growth and brain development, according to a California study. More: Environmental Health News


Flame retardants can alter thyroid hormones in pregnant women, new study shows

High levels of brominated flame retardants can alter pregnant women’s thyroid hormones, which are critical to a baby’s growth and brain development, according to a California study. More: Environmental Health News

10/06/2010 -

Scientists have found evidence suggesting that chemicals designed to prevent fires are getting into your children's blood and rewiring their brains, leading to attention deficit disorder, hyperactivity, hearing problems, slow mental development and, possibly, cancer.
More: life.salon.com


The poison crib: When protective chemicals harm

Scientists have found evidence suggesting that chemicals designed to prevent fires are getting into your children's blood and rewiring their brains, leading to attention deficit disorder, hyperactivity, hearing problems, slow mental development and, possibly, cancer.
More: life.salon.com

03/06/2010 -

Women with higher blood concentrations of PBDE flame retardants may take significantly longer to get pregnant. Chemicals widely used to prevent fires in household products like furniture and electronics may contribute to fertility problems by lengthening the time it takes for a woman to get pregnant, according to study of low-income, mostly Mexican-American women living in California.
More: Environmental Health News


Flame retardants linked to longer time to get pregnant, finds California study

Women with higher blood concentrations of PBDE flame retardants may take significantly longer to get pregnant. Chemicals widely used to prevent fires in household products like furniture and electronics may contribute to fertility problems by lengthening the time it takes for a woman to get pregnant, according to study of low-income, mostly Mexican-American women living in California.
More: Environmental Health News

24/05/2010 -

A study published in February, 2010 in Environmental Science & Technology found that professional ski-waxers, the people that help Lindsay Vaughn fly, have higher levels in their bodies of the toxic chemical C8, also known as perfluorooctanoic acid, or PFOA. The levels of PFOA were 50 times greater than are found in the general population.
More: NRDC - Smarter Living


Chemical Culprits: PFCs

A study published in February, 2010 in Environmental Science & Technology found that professional ski-waxers, the people that help Lindsay Vaughn fly, have higher levels in their bodies of the toxic chemical C8, also known as perfluorooctanoic acid, or PFOA. The levels of PFOA were 50 times greater than are found in the general population.
More: NRDC - Smarter Living

03/05/2010 -

Two new studies show remarkably high levels of PBDE flame retardants in the bodies of California children. PBDE body burden levels in two separate populations of California children were 10 to 1,000 times higher than European children, 2 to 10 times higher than other U.S. children and adults, and approached levels measured in occupationally-exposed adults.
More: Environmental Health News


Studies find remarkably high levels of flame retardants in California's children

Two new studies show remarkably high levels of PBDE flame retardants in the bodies of California children. PBDE body burden levels in two separate populations of California children were 10 to 1,000 times higher than European children, 2 to 10 times higher than other U.S. children and adults, and approached levels measured in occupationally-exposed adults.
More: Environmental Health News

12/04/2010 -

Selon l'Agence française de sécurité sanitaire des aliments, les femmes qui sont enceintes ou allaitantes et les enfants de moins de trois ans doivent être mieux protégés contre les PCB, classés en tant que substances probablement cancérigènes pour l'Homme.
More: BIOaddict


Pollution et PCB : après les poissons, c'est l'Homme qui trinque !

Selon l'Agence française de sécurité sanitaire des aliments, les femmes qui sont enceintes ou allaitantes et les enfants de moins de trois ans doivent être mieux protégés contre les PCB, classés en tant que substances probablement cancérigènes pour l'Homme.
More: BIOaddict

09/04/2010 -

Women with higher levels of dioxin in their blood when they tried to get pregnant took longer to conceive than women with lower levels, researchers report in a followup study. The women were exposed to high levels of the chemical when a manufacturing plant in Seveso, Italy, exploded in 1976.
More: Environmental Health News


Dioxin exposure linked to infertility, difficulty conceiving

Women with higher levels of dioxin in their blood when they tried to get pregnant took longer to conceive than women with lower levels, researchers report in a followup study. The women were exposed to high levels of the chemical when a manufacturing plant in Seveso, Italy, exploded in 1976.
More: Environmental Health News

07/04/2010 -

Wilkins talks in an upbeat way with anyone who will listen. She helps families seek answers and military benefits for the returning vets from Iraq and Afghanistan who are reporting an array of illnesses - from cancer to Parkinson’s disease, skin rashes to tremors. The unifying thread – all had been exposed to burn pits during their time in Iraq and Afghanistan.
More: InjuryBoard.com


Burn Pits: The Jill Wilkins' Story

Wilkins talks in an upbeat way with anyone who will listen. She helps families seek answers and military benefits for the returning vets from Iraq and Afghanistan who are reporting an array of illnesses - from cancer to Parkinson’s disease, skin rashes to tremors. The unifying thread – all had been exposed to burn pits during their time in Iraq and Afghanistan.
More: InjuryBoard.com

05/04/2010 -

A government study says fish in Swiss waters are not overly contaminated with PCBs but others say too little is known about the effects the chemicals have on humans.
More: www.swissinfo.ch


Banned for 24 years, PCBs still linger

A government study says fish in Swiss waters are not overly contaminated with PCBs but others say too little is known about the effects the chemicals have on humans.
More: www.swissinfo.ch

29/01/2010 -

The EPA recently announced a list of chemicals to be reviewed. On the list: flame retardants or PBDEs. Scientists say these chemicals, used to reduce the flammability of upholstery and carpeting, accumulate in our bodies. Host Jeff Young talks with Dr. Julie Herbstman of Columbia University about a new study that indicates PBDEs may affect the intelligence of young children. 
More: Living on Earth


Up in Flames - a new study that indicates PBDEs may affect the intelligence of young children

The EPA recently announced a list of chemicals to be reviewed. On the list: flame retardants or PBDEs. Scientists say these chemicals, used to reduce the flammability of upholstery and carpeting, accumulate in our bodies. Host Jeff Young talks with Dr. Julie Herbstman of Columbia University about a new study that indicates PBDEs may affect the intelligence of young children. 
More: Living on Earth

25/01/2010 -

A study of breast milk samples from more than 300 women in North Carolina finds flame retardants contaminate the milk from almost three-quarters of the woman in the study. Women older than 35 had the lowest levels of PBDEs in their milk. The highest levels were measured in breast milk from women aged 25 to 29, followed by women younger than 25 years old.
More: Environmental Health News


Younger mothers' breast milk has highest levels of flame retardants

A study of breast milk samples from more than 300 women in North Carolina finds flame retardants contaminate the milk from almost three-quarters of the woman in the study. Women older than 35 had the lowest levels of PBDEs in their milk. The highest levels were measured in breast milk from women aged 25 to 29, followed by women younger than 25 years old.
More: Environmental Health News

21/10/2009 -

Those pristine-looking Alpine glaciers now melting as global warming sets in may explain the mysterious increase in persistent organic pollutants in sediment from certain lakes since the 1990s, despite decreased use of those compounds in pesticides, electric equipment, paints and other products.
More: www.sciencedaily.com


Glacial Melting May Release Pollutants Into The Environment

Those pristine-looking Alpine glaciers now melting as global warming sets in may explain the mysterious increase in persistent organic pollutants in sediment from certain lakes since the 1990s, despite decreased use of those compounds in pesticides, electric equipment, paints and other products.
More: www.sciencedaily.com

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