POPs in the news

14/11/2011 -

There are still relatively few Inuit among the more than nine million Canadians living with diabetes or pre-diabetes. But that situation is changing.
More: Nunatsiaq Online


Nunavut diabetes rate soars

There are still relatively few Inuit among the more than nine million Canadians living with diabetes or pre-diabetes. But that situation is changing.
More: Nunatsiaq Online

14/11/2011 -

L'Autorité européenne de sécurité des aliments (EFSA) vient de publier son nouveau rapport annuel sur la présence de pesticides dans les aliments. Ce rapport confirme que les produits issus de l'agriculture biologique sont nettement moins contaminés que les autres.
More: www.notre-planete.info


Résidus de pesticides dans les aliments : la bio est nettement plus saine

L'Autorité européenne de sécurité des aliments (EFSA) vient de publier son nouveau rapport annuel sur la présence de pesticides dans les aliments. Ce rapport confirme que les produits issus de l'agriculture biologique sont nettement moins contaminés que les autres.
More: www.notre-planete.info

09/11/2011 -

Kailasahar - Rampant use of endosulfan is poisoning rivers in the north east region of India, the world’s largest producer and exporter of the hazardous chemical.
More: Digital Journal


Endosulfan poisons Indian rivers

Kailasahar - Rampant use of endosulfan is poisoning rivers in the north east region of India, the world’s largest producer and exporter of the hazardous chemical.
More: Digital Journal

07/11/2011 -

The cleanup will be required when state officials decide how much of the pollutant - PFOS, or perfluorooctane sulfonate - should be allowed in Pool 2, a section of the Mississippi River between the Ford Dam in St. Paul and Hastings.
More: TwinCities.com


State gets ally in fight over 3M cleanup

The cleanup will be required when state officials decide how much of the pollutant - PFOS, or perfluorooctane sulfonate - should be allowed in Pool 2, a section of the Mississippi River between the Ford Dam in St. Paul and Hastings.
More: TwinCities.com

30/10/2011 -

Monitoring in the Arctic for toxic substances produced in farms and factories located far to the south continues this year, with scientists like Anya Gawor on the look-out for traces of these contaminants in the Arctic air and waters, and even in tiny sea creatures.
More: Nunatsiaq Online


Monitoring shows contaminants still pollute the Arctic

Monitoring in the Arctic for toxic substances produced in farms and factories located far to the south continues this year, with scientists like Anya Gawor on the look-out for traces of these contaminants in the Arctic air and waters, and even in tiny sea creatures.
More: Nunatsiaq Online

27/10/2011 -

Researchers have developed new tools to screen previously untested fire-retardant chemicals for potential toxicity. The tools – known as Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models – could allow regulatory decisions to be made in the absence of experimental data, saving time and money by prioritising risk assessments for the most hazardous substances.
More: Science for Environment Policy


New tools to predict toxicity of fire retardant

Researchers have developed new tools to screen previously untested fire-retardant chemicals for potential toxicity. The tools – known as Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models – could allow regulatory decisions to be made in the absence of experimental data, saving time and money by prioritising risk assessments for the most hazardous substances.
More: Science for Environment Policy

26/10/2011 -

Dr. Warner was a very successful chemist by the mid-1990s, but his son’s death led him to the disturbing realization that he had never had a course in toxicology and knew little about what makes some chemicals hazardous.
More: The Globe and Mail


Tragedy prompts chemist’s switch to greener path

Dr. Warner was a very successful chemist by the mid-1990s, but his son’s death led him to the disturbing realization that he had never had a course in toxicology and knew little about what makes some chemicals hazardous.
More: The Globe and Mail

20/10/2011 -

Research in four German rivers indicates that several organic compounds pose a risk of acute toxic effects on invertebrates.
More: European Commission - Science for Environment Policy


Range of chemicals pose risk of acute ecotoxicity in German rivers

Research in four German rivers indicates that several organic compounds pose a risk of acute toxic effects on invertebrates.
More: European Commission - Science for Environment Policy

15/10/2011 -

A panel of experts has recommended that a toxic flame retardant be added to a watch list of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) designed to eliminate the impact of hazardous chemicals on human health and the environment.
More: Newsroom America


Hazardous Chemical Recommended For Elimination

A panel of experts has recommended that a toxic flame retardant be added to a watch list of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) designed to eliminate the impact of hazardous chemicals on human health and the environment.
More: Newsroom America

14/10/2011 -

Le Comité de revue de la Convention de Stockholm sur les polluants organiques persistants (POPs) a indiqué vendredi qu'il recommandait l'élimination de l'ignifugeant HBCD, un produit utilisé principalement dans la fabrication de mousses de polystyrène.
More: Daily-Bourse (French)


Des experts de l'ONU recommandent l'élimination de l'ignifugeant HBCD

Le Comité de revue de la Convention de Stockholm sur les polluants organiques persistants (POPs) a indiqué vendredi qu'il recommandait l'élimination de l'ignifugeant HBCD, un produit utilisé principalement dans la fabrication de mousses de polystyrène.
More: Daily-Bourse (French)

13/10/2011 -

Organochlorine pesticides, a class of older chemicals used mostly to kill bugs—including the now banned and notoriously toxic DDT—have been linked to all sorts of health problems over the years, including cancer, birth defects, and neurological problems. A new studied published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives discovered a link between organochlorine pesticides and developmental problems, as well.
More: Rodale News


Shrinking Kids? Pesticides Could Stunt Growth

Organochlorine pesticides, a class of older chemicals used mostly to kill bugs—including the now banned and notoriously toxic DDT—have been linked to all sorts of health problems over the years, including cancer, birth defects, and neurological problems. A new studied published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives discovered a link between organochlorine pesticides and developmental problems, as well.
More: Rodale News

11/10/2011 -

Fifty years ago the modern environmental movement was sparked into the mainstream media when Rachel Carson finished her groundbreaking book, “Silent Spring.”
More: LakeForester


Debate over malaria, insecticides continues 50 years after debut of ‘Silent Spring’

Fifty years ago the modern environmental movement was sparked into the mainstream media when Rachel Carson finished her groundbreaking book, “Silent Spring.”
More: LakeForester

30/09/2011 -

The people of Kasaragod were active participants in the worldwide crusade against the killer pesticide. Reports, pictures and videos of victims of the pesticide and the environmental hazards it had caused in Kasaragod had worked as a great inspiration for those who had successfully campaigned for its ban at the Geneva meet on persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in April last.
More: www.dailypioneer.com


Ban on Endosulfan brings relief to tragedy-land Kasaragod

The people of Kasaragod were active participants in the worldwide crusade against the killer pesticide. Reports, pictures and videos of victims of the pesticide and the environmental hazards it had caused in Kasaragod had worked as a great inspiration for those who had successfully campaigned for its ban at the Geneva meet on persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in April last.
More: www.dailypioneer.com

29/09/2011 -

New studies have underscored the potentially harmful health effects of the most widely used flame retardants, found in everything from baby blankets to carpets. Health experts are now calling for more aggressive action to limit these chemicals, including cutting back on highly flammable, petroleum-based materials used in many consumer products.
More: Yale Environment 360


Are Flame Retardants Safe? Growing Evidence Says ‘No’

New studies have underscored the potentially harmful health effects of the most widely used flame retardants, found in everything from baby blankets to carpets. Health experts are now calling for more aggressive action to limit these chemicals, including cutting back on highly flammable, petroleum-based materials used in many consumer products.
More: Yale Environment 360

16/09/2011 -

DDT, the pesticide that was banned almost thirty years ago, is still widely found in human bodies, says Professor Tze Wai Wong, an environmental epidemiologist and public health and occupational physician of The Chinese University of Hong Kong.
More: Asian Scientist


DDT, Dioxins & Banned Pesticides Still Detected In Human Milk

DDT, the pesticide that was banned almost thirty years ago, is still widely found in human bodies, says Professor Tze Wai Wong, an environmental epidemiologist and public health and occupational physician of The Chinese University of Hong Kong.
More: Asian Scientist

13/09/2011 -

SYDNEY: Despite an international treaty banning its use, the pesticide DDT is still turning up in humans, confirming a continued presence in our food chain, new research suggests.
More: COSMOS


DDT pesticide found in human milk

SYDNEY: Despite an international treaty banning its use, the pesticide DDT is still turning up in humans, confirming a continued presence in our food chain, new research suggests.
More: COSMOS

08/09/2011 -

Les pesticides organochlorés, des perturbateurs endocriniens encore présents dans l’alimentation, pourraient diminuer la fertilité chez les femmes en agissant dès le stade de l’implantation, selon une étude publiée dans la revue Environmental Health Perspectives (EHP). 
More: Journal de l'environnement (French)


Les organochlorés perturberaient l’implantation de l’œuf fécondé

Les pesticides organochlorés, des perturbateurs endocriniens encore présents dans l’alimentation, pourraient diminuer la fertilité chez les femmes en agissant dès le stade de l’implantation, selon une étude publiée dans la revue Environmental Health Perspectives (EHP). 
More: Journal de l'environnement (French)

26/08/2011 -

The EPA and independent researchers can't possibly test the huge range of chemicals found in products we use. But now a tireless, efficient bot will take on the task.
More: Discover magazine


The Toxinator: EPA Robot Tests Chemicals to See if They're Poison

The EPA and independent researchers can't possibly test the huge range of chemicals found in products we use. But now a tireless, efficient bot will take on the task.
More: Discover magazine

17/08/2011 -

(Reuters Health) -  People with relatively high levels of certain pesticides in their blood may have an increased risk of type 2 diabetes -- particularly if they are overweight, a new study suggests.
More: www.reuters.com


More evidence links pesticides, diabetes

(Reuters Health) -  People with relatively high levels of certain pesticides in their blood may have an increased risk of type 2 diabetes -- particularly if they are overweight, a new study suggests.
More: www.reuters.com

31/07/2011 -

For years, the explanation for weight gain was straightforward: it was all about energy balance, or calories-in versus calories-out. Environmental scientists have long suggested that there were likely external factors at work, but until recently, the traditional obesity-research community rejected such claims. Now it seems that the tide is turning in the light of the accumulating body of research linking the environment with obesity.
More: Nutrition Digest - American Nutrition Association


Could Shampoo Make You Fat?

For years, the explanation for weight gain was straightforward: it was all about energy balance, or calories-in versus calories-out. Environmental scientists have long suggested that there were likely external factors at work, but until recently, the traditional obesity-research community rejected such claims. Now it seems that the tide is turning in the light of the accumulating body of research linking the environment with obesity.
More: Nutrition Digest - American Nutrition Association

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