POPs in the news

01/12/2022 -

Potentially life-saving insecticidal malaria nets, designed to be biologically effective for at least 3 years, may stop working well after just 12 months, suggests research of their use in one East African country. More:


Long-lasting insecticidal malaria nets' biological effectiveness may be short-lived

Potentially life-saving insecticidal malaria nets, designed to be biologically effective for at least 3 years, may stop working well after just 12 months, suggests research of their use in one East African country. More:

30/11/2022 -

Reductive water treatment using hydrated electrons is a promising technology to destruct perfluoroalkyl substances; however, it faces challenges of slow reaction kinetics, undesirable chemical addition, and high energy consumption. Researchers developed a hydrogen-polarized water photolysis system using vacuum UV (VUV) light at 185 nm for reductive destruction of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS). More:


Hydrogen-polarized vacuum ultraviolet photolysis system for enhanced destruction of perfluoroalkyl substances

Reductive water treatment using hydrated electrons is a promising technology to destruct perfluoroalkyl substances; however, it faces challenges of slow reaction kinetics, undesirable chemical addition, and high energy consumption. Researchers developed a hydrogen-polarized water photolysis system using vacuum UV (VUV) light at 185 nm for reductive destruction of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS). More:

29/11/2022 -

Investors with US$8 trillion under management and advice are calling on the world’s biggest chemical producers to phase out persistent chemicals as the annual ChemScore ranking, released today, shows the industry is doing little to halt an emerging global crisis. More:


Investors with $8 trillion call for phase-out of dangerous “forever chemicals”

Investors with US$8 trillion under management and advice are calling on the world’s biggest chemical producers to phase out persistent chemicals as the annual ChemScore ranking, released today, shows the industry is doing little to halt an emerging global crisis. More:

28/11/2022 -

The Western Virginia Water Authority is spending millions of dollars on an advanced filter system to keep a dangerous “forever chemical” made by Chemours chemical company from fouling the drinking water it distributes to customers in the Roanoke area. More:


Opinion/Editorial: PFAS denials leave polluters unaccountable

The Western Virginia Water Authority is spending millions of dollars on an advanced filter system to keep a dangerous “forever chemical” made by Chemours chemical company from fouling the drinking water it distributes to customers in the Roanoke area. More:

28/11/2022 -

From the 1930s through the 1990s, oil companies added lead to gasoline to make engines run smoother, forcing two generations to breathe leaded air. Older generations have five fewer IQ points on average because they grew up breathing those fumes, Duke University researchers reported in 2017. More:

The Toxic Legacy of Leaded Fuel Phasing Out Leaded Fuel Legacy Pollutant - DDT Legacy Pollutant- Asbestos Children Exposure to Lead and Health Impact

Tomlinson: Millennials and Gen Z are smarter than baby boomers thanks to chemical companies' mistake

From the 1930s through the 1990s, oil companies added lead to gasoline to make engines run smoother, forcing two generations to breathe leaded air. Older generations have five fewer IQ points on average because they grew up breathing those fumes, Duke University researchers reported in 2017. More:

The Toxic Legacy of Leaded Fuel Phasing Out Leaded Fuel Legacy Pollutant - DDT Legacy Pollutant- Abestos Children Exposure to Lead and Health Impact
28/11/2022 -

Downstream of a Chemours fluorochemical manufacturing plant on the Cape Fear River in North Carolina, people living in Brunswick and New Hanover counties suffer from higher-than-normal rates of brain tumors, breast cancers and other forms of rare — and accelerated — diseases. More:

Identification of PFAS sources Human Exposure to PFAS PFAS Human Health Effects

Where did the PFAS in your blood come from? These computer models offer clues

Downstream of a Chemours fluorochemical manufacturing plant on the Cape Fear River in North Carolina, people living in Brunswick and New Hanover counties suffer from higher-than-normal rates of brain tumors, breast cancers and other forms of rare — and accelerated — diseases. More:

Identification of PFAS sources Human Exposure to PFAS PFAS Human Health Effects
27/11/2022 -

Limiting new sources of exposure to per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) can gradually lower your accumulated chemical load, aptly known as your body burden. PFAS compounds can linger in bodies for decades, with concentrations in blood plasma taking up to eight years to decline by half. Growing scientific evidence suggests that even low levels of PFAS can disrupt hormonal, immune and reproductive systems, and can increase the risk of various cancers. More:

Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) PFAS: PFOS and PFOA PFAS Body Burden PFAS Human Health Effects PFAS Water Contamination, Testing and Treatment  PFAS and other POPs in Food PFAS in Food Packaging and Cookware PFAS in Consumer Products and Alternatives PFAS in the Garden PFAS in the Industry: Firefighting, Building, and Lubricant Oils

How you can reduce your PFAS body burden

Limiting new sources of exposure to per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) can gradually lower your accumulated chemical load, aptly known as your body burden. PFAS compounds can linger in bodies for decades, with concentrations in blood plasma taking up to eight years to decline by half. Growing scientific evidence suggests that even low levels of PFAS can disrupt hormonal, immune and reproductive systems, and can increase the risk of various cancers. More:

Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) PFAS: PFOS and PFOA PFAS Body Burden PFAS Human Health Effects PFAS Water Contamination, Testing and Treatment  PFAS and other POPs in Food PFAS in Food Packaging and Cookware PFAS in Consumer Products and Alternatives PFAS in the Garden PFAS in the Industry: Firefighting, Building, and Lubricant Oils
27/11/2022 -

At the end of Joy Road in Fairfield, a steep dead-end road climbs a hillside to a scattering of homes with distant mountain views and some of the higher concentrations of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) the state has found to date in groundwater. The neighbors here live under what one resident, Nathan Saunders, called the “cloud of an unknown future,” fearing how PFAS exposure may erode their health. More:

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) PFAS: Soil, water and wildlife contamination Human Exposure to PFAS in everyday life Human Exposure to PFAS in professional life PFAS Health Effects PFAS Regulation PFAS Management PFAS Economic Impact

Forever exposure, forever anxiety: Coping with the inescapable toxicity of PFAS

At the end of Joy Road in Fairfield, a steep dead-end road climbs a hillside to a scattering of homes with distant mountain views and some of the higher concentrations of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) the state has found to date in groundwater. The neighbors here live under what one resident, Nathan Saunders, called the “cloud of an unknown future,” fearing how PFAS exposure may erode their health. More:

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) PFAS: Soil, water and wildlife contamination Human Exposure to PFAS in everyday life Human Exposure to PFAS in professional life PFAS Health Effects PFAS Regulation PFAS Management PFAS Economic Impact
23/11/2022 -

The mining city of La Oroya, in western-central Peru is one of the most polluted places in the world.. According to the International Federation for Human Rights, 97 per cent of La Oroya children between six months and six years of age, and 98 per cent between age seven and 12, had elevated levels of lead in their blood in 2013. More:


Health or survival? The impossible choice facing one Peruvian mining community

The mining city of La Oroya, in western-central Peru is one of the most polluted places in the world.. According to the International Federation for Human Rights, 97 per cent of La Oroya children between six months and six years of age, and 98 per cent between age seven and 12, had elevated levels of lead in their blood in 2013. More:

23/11/2022 -

Every year, insects like the cotton bollworm destroy more than 20 percent of the world’s crops. Farmers fight back by using pesticides, but some are harmful to our health, and many damage surrounding ecosystems. Clearly, more environmentally friendly approaches to pest control are needed, and there’s one solution that could be about to hit the big time: targeting these pests’ sex drives. More:


To Ditch Pesticides, Scientists Are Hacking Insects’ Sex Signals

Every year, insects like the cotton bollworm destroy more than 20 percent of the world’s crops. Farmers fight back by using pesticides, but some are harmful to our health, and many damage surrounding ecosystems. Clearly, more environmentally friendly approaches to pest control are needed, and there’s one solution that could be about to hit the big time: targeting these pests’ sex drives. More:

22/11/2022 -

A new study finds exposure to the harmful class of chemicals known as phthalates poses particular risks for women. These substances lurk in many household items people use every day, including personal care products, clothing and more. More:

Phthalates - Human Health Effects Phthalates - Avoiding Exposure

Hiding in household products: Study links phthalates to uterine fibroids

A new study finds exposure to the harmful class of chemicals known as phthalates poses particular risks for women. These substances lurk in many household items people use every day, including personal care products, clothing and more. More:

Phthalates - Human Health Effects Phthalates - Avoiding Exposure
21/11/2022 -

The lungs’ immune defenses can wane with age, leaving older adults more susceptible to lung damage and severe bouts of respiratory infections. New research reveals one reason why this might happen: Inhaled particulate matter from pollution gunks up the works over time, weakening the lungs’ immune system. More:

Human Health Effects

Pollution mucks up the lungs’ immune defenses over time

The lungs’ immune defenses can wane with age, leaving older adults more susceptible to lung damage and severe bouts of respiratory infections. New research reveals one reason why this might happen: Inhaled particulate matter from pollution gunks up the works over time, weakening the lungs’ immune system. More:

Human Health Effects
17/11/2022 -

The production of blue jeans, one of the most popular apparel items ever, has for decades left behind a trail of heavy consumption, diminishing Earth’s water and energy resources, causing pollution, and contributing to climate change. More:

Cotton Environmental and Social Impacts Textile Industry Environmental Impact The Making of Jeans

Blue jeans: An iconic fashion item that’s costing the planet dearly

The production of blue jeans, one of the most popular apparel items ever, has for decades left behind a trail of heavy consumption, diminishing Earth’s water and energy resources, causing pollution, and contributing to climate change. More:

Cotton Environmental and Social Impacts Textile Industry Environmental Impact The Making of Jeans
17/11/2022 -

In a new analysis, researchers at Mount Sinai Medical Center, the University of Copenhagen, and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, among others, found that sperm count globally dropped by more than half between 1973 and 2018, and that the decline is accelerating: Since 1972, sperm count has dropped by about 1% each year. Since 2000, the annual decrease has been, on average, more than 2.6%. More:

Chemicals exposure and reproductive health Temporal trends in sperm count

A new analysis shows a “crisis” of male reproductive health

In a new analysis, researchers at Mount Sinai Medical Center, the University of Copenhagen, and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, among others, found that sperm count globally dropped by more than half between 1973 and 2018, and that the decline is accelerating: Since 1972, sperm count has dropped by about 1% each year. Since 2000, the annual decrease has been, on average, more than 2.6%. More:

Chemicals exposure and reproductive health Temporal trends in sperm count
14/11/2022 -

Non-stick cookware is often a kitchen favorite because food doesn’t stick to its surface—making it easy to whip up dinner without a huge cleaning hassle. The kitchen essential has grown in popularity since scientists created the first non-stick cooking pan in 1954, but the COVID-19 pandemic drove a surge. The market demand for non-stick cookware reached 206.1 million units worldwide in 2020 and is expected to increase even more due to the growing preference for it. More:

Perfluoroalkyl and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) PFAS in Nonstick Cooking and Baking Pans PFAS Coated Non-stick Cookware and Toxicity PFAS Alternatives: How to Make Stainless Steel Pans Non-stick

Why you should throw away your non-stick pan the second it cracks

Non-stick cookware is often a kitchen favorite because food doesn’t stick to its surface—making it easy to whip up dinner without a huge cleaning hassle. The kitchen essential has grown in popularity since scientists created the first non-stick cooking pan in 1954, but the COVID-19 pandemic drove a surge. The market demand for non-stick cookware reached 206.1 million units worldwide in 2020 and is expected to increase even more due to the growing preference for it. More:

Perfluoroalkyl and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) PFAS in Nonstick Cooking and Baking Pans PFAS Coated Non-stick Cookware and Toxicity PFAS Alternatives: How to Make Stainless Steel Pans Non-stick
11/11/2022 -

A lawsuit filed by the state of California accuses 3M, Dupont and 16 smaller companies of covering up the harm caused to the environment and the public from chemicals manufactured by the firms that have over decades found their way into waterways and human bloodstreams. More:


California sues over ‘forever chemicals’ that taint water

A lawsuit filed by the state of California accuses 3M, Dupont and 16 smaller companies of covering up the harm caused to the environment and the public from chemicals manufactured by the firms that have over decades found their way into waterways and human bloodstreams. More:

11/11/2022 -

After Theo Colborn, Dianne Dumanoski and I published Our Stolen Future in 1996, we got "slapped" by one of the most prominent science journalists of the day, Gina Kolata writing for the New York Times. Among her criticisms was that one chemical can't cause a plethora of diseases. More:


Reflecting on two decades of progress in environmental health and science communication

After Theo Colborn, Dianne Dumanoski and I published Our Stolen Future in 1996, we got "slapped" by one of the most prominent science journalists of the day, Gina Kolata writing for the New York Times. Among her criticisms was that one chemical can't cause a plethora of diseases. More:

09/11/2022 -

The study, one of the first to investigate the decades-long consequences of lead poisoning, suggests countries could face an explosion of people seeking support for dementia as individuals who were exposed to high lead levels during early life progress into old age. More:


Children exposed to lead may experience symptoms of dementia sooner – study

The study, one of the first to investigate the decades-long consequences of lead poisoning, suggests countries could face an explosion of people seeking support for dementia as individuals who were exposed to high lead levels during early life progress into old age. More:

07/11/2022 -

In a study published in Environmental Health Perspectives, researchers from the Mount Sinai Medical Center and Johns Hopkins School of Public Health presented a new tool that offers PFAS researchers a way to compare total exposures to PFAS across scientific studies. The tool may provide researchers a more effective method to study these persistent toxins. More:


New PFAS exposure scoring method could speed research on health effects

In a study published in Environmental Health Perspectives, researchers from the Mount Sinai Medical Center and Johns Hopkins School of Public Health presented a new tool that offers PFAS researchers a way to compare total exposures to PFAS across scientific studies. The tool may provide researchers a more effective method to study these persistent toxins. More:

07/11/2022 -

Buildings renovated with healthier furnishings had significantly lower levels of the entire group of per- and polyfluoralkyl substances (PFAS)—toxic chemicals linked with many negative health effects—than buildings with conventional furnishings, according to a new study led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. More:


PFAS levels lower in buildings with healthier furnishings

Buildings renovated with healthier furnishings had significantly lower levels of the entire group of per- and polyfluoralkyl substances (PFAS)—toxic chemicals linked with many negative health effects—than buildings with conventional furnishings, according to a new study led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. More:

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