POPs in the news

23/02/2019 -

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are the largest identified complex group of environmental pollutants reported in the scientific literature. These chemicals have many uses in the marketplace. However, their strong carbon–fluorine bonds keep them from degrading, and they bind to blood proteins, hindering their elimination from the body. More:

Consensus Statements

Highly Cited Reviews

Highly Cited Original Research


PFAS Collection

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are the largest identified complex group of environmental pollutants reported in the scientific literature. These chemicals have many uses in the marketplace. However, their strong carbon–fluorine bonds keep them from degrading, and they bind to blood proteins, hindering their elimination from the body. More:

Consensus Statements

Highly Cited Reviews

Highly Cited Original Research

22/02/2019 -

That was 2016. Since then, the Defense Department has admitted that it allowed a firefighting foam to slip into at least 55 drinking water systems at military bases around the globe, sometimes for generations. This exposed tens of thousands of Americans, possibly many more, to per-and polyfluoroalkyl substances, a group of man-made chemicals known as PFAS that have been linked to cancers, immune suppression and other serious health problems. More:


Toxic ‘Forever Chemicals’ in Drinking Water Leave Military Families Reeling

That was 2016. Since then, the Defense Department has admitted that it allowed a firefighting foam to slip into at least 55 drinking water systems at military bases around the globe, sometimes for generations. This exposed tens of thousands of Americans, possibly many more, to per-and polyfluoroalkyl substances, a group of man-made chemicals known as PFAS that have been linked to cancers, immune suppression and other serious health problems. More:

18/02/2019 -

Children who live in homes with certain types of flooring and furniture may be exposed to higher concentrations of potentially harmful chemicals, known as semi-volatile organic compounds, or SVOCs, according to research. More:


Toxins from vinyl flooring and flame-retardant sofas found in children

Children who live in homes with certain types of flooring and furniture may be exposed to higher concentrations of potentially harmful chemicals, known as semi-volatile organic compounds, or SVOCs, according to research. More:

17/02/2019 -

Insects are important wildlife often overlooked in urban habitats. What we do notice are the cockroaches, ants and mosquitoes in and around our homes. All too often we reach for the insect spray. More:


The battle against bugs: it’s time to end chemical warfare

Insects are important wildlife often overlooked in urban habitats. What we do notice are the cockroaches, ants and mosquitoes in and around our homes. All too often we reach for the insect spray. More:

15/02/2019 -

This peer-reviewed study helps answer a question many of us ask when deciding whether to reach for the conventional or organic option at the store: does organic really make a difference? The results say yes, a big difference. Choosing organic can protect you from exposure to toxic pesticides. More:


What the pesticides in our urine tell us about organic food

This peer-reviewed study helps answer a question many of us ask when deciding whether to reach for the conventional or organic option at the store: does organic really make a difference? The results say yes, a big difference. Choosing organic can protect you from exposure to toxic pesticides. More:

14/02/2019 -

The state Department of Environmental Quality and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency knew that Chemours was shipping wastewater containing GenX from the Netherlands to North Carolina at least a year before the shipments were publicly disclosed by the media. More:


Environmentalists bemoan regulators’ lack of transparency on imported shipments of GenX wastewater

The state Department of Environmental Quality and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency knew that Chemours was shipping wastewater containing GenX from the Netherlands to North Carolina at least a year before the shipments were publicly disclosed by the media. More:

08/02/2019 -

A decades-long study in California is shining a light on the impact of pesticides on childhood brain development, while getting young people directly involved in the research. While the research remains the primary aim of CHAMACOS a large part of their outreach has been disseminating the study’s key findings to the public. More:


How a team of researchers and high school students in California are working together to reduce pesticide exposure in children

A decades-long study in California is shining a light on the impact of pesticides on childhood brain development, while getting young people directly involved in the research. While the research remains the primary aim of CHAMACOS a large part of their outreach has been disseminating the study’s key findings to the public. More:

06/02/2019 -

Researchers are struggling to assess the dangers of nondegradable compounds used in clothes, foams and food wrappings. The water looks unremarkable, but it is contaminated with synthetic compounds called fluorochemicals, which have been generating increasing concern around the world. More:


Tainted water: the scientists tracing thousands of fluorinated chemicals in our environment

Researchers are struggling to assess the dangers of nondegradable compounds used in clothes, foams and food wrappings. The water looks unremarkable, but it is contaminated with synthetic compounds called fluorochemicals, which have been generating increasing concern around the world. More:

06/02/2019 -

Study of more than 1,000 mothers and children in Europe links common chemicals to reduced lung function. Children exposed to three different chemical classes — parabens, phthalates and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS)—before birth and shortly after had reduced lung function at 6 and 12 years old, according to a study. More:


PFAS and phthalate chemical exposure early in life may hamper kids’ lungs

Study of more than 1,000 mothers and children in Europe links common chemicals to reduced lung function. Children exposed to three different chemical classes — parabens, phthalates and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS)—before birth and shortly after had reduced lung function at 6 and 12 years old, according to a study. More:

01/02/2019 -

DuPont-spinoff Chemours is sending industrial waste from the Netherlands to North Carolina. The waste in question comes from the production of the toxic chemical GenX, DuPont’s replacement for the surfactant PFOA, which was long used in the production of Teflon and many other products. More:


Chemours is using the U.S. as an unregulated dump for Europe's toxic GenX waste

DuPont-spinoff Chemours is sending industrial waste from the Netherlands to North Carolina. The waste in question comes from the production of the toxic chemical GenX, DuPont’s replacement for the surfactant PFOA, which was long used in the production of Teflon and many other products. More:

30/01/2019 -

They want financial aid, medical facilities, schools for their disabled children and a tribunal to book those responsible for the pesticide tragedy. More:


‘We want justice’: Victims of endosulfan poisoning in Kerala set to start hunger strike

They want financial aid, medical facilities, schools for their disabled children and a tribunal to book those responsible for the pesticide tragedy. More:

28/01/2019 -

Globally, 255 different weeds have developed resistance to 163 different herbicides. These weeds compete with crops for space, water, and nutrients in the soil—and they’re beginning to impact many farmers’ yields. More:


Australia Might Have the Answer to Herbicide-Resistant ‘Superweeds’

Globally, 255 different weeds have developed resistance to 163 different herbicides. These weeds compete with crops for space, water, and nutrients in the soil—and they’re beginning to impact many farmers’ yields. More:

27/01/2019 -

Detection of a toxic chemical in a northeastern Wisconsin wastewater treatment plant’s sludge has prompted a halt to application of the material on nearby farms and raised broader concerns about how public sewer systems across the state may be spreading the chemical across the landscape. More:


Wisconsin case shows how sewage plants spread unregulated toxins across landscape

Detection of a toxic chemical in a northeastern Wisconsin wastewater treatment plant’s sludge has prompted a halt to application of the material on nearby farms and raised broader concerns about how public sewer systems across the state may be spreading the chemical across the landscape. More:

27/01/2019 -

the U.S. military is moving ahead with plans to collect and destroy unused firefighting foam that contains the hazardous chemicals PFOS and PFOA. But in trying to solve one environmental problem related to these persistent chemicals, which have caused massive drinking water contamination, the Defense Department may be creating another. More:


The Teflon Toxin series: Incinerating toxic firefighting foam

the U.S. military is moving ahead with plans to collect and destroy unused firefighting foam that contains the hazardous chemicals PFOS and PFOA. But in trying to solve one environmental problem related to these persistent chemicals, which have caused massive drinking water contamination, the Defense Department may be creating another. More:

14/01/2019 -

A concentrated formula, diluted with water, forms a heat-resistant foam blanket that rapidly cools and smothers most hydrocarbon-fueled fires. The fluorine content helps create a low-surface-tension film that rapidly spreads across the surface of a flammable liquid. A foam’s quick action in a fire can mean the difference between life and death. As lawsuits pile up and government pressure rises, firefighting-foam makers reconsider the environmental cost of fluorosurfactants. More:


What is the price of fire safety?

A concentrated formula, diluted with water, forms a heat-resistant foam blanket that rapidly cools and smothers most hydrocarbon-fueled fires. The fluorine content helps create a low-surface-tension film that rapidly spreads across the surface of a flammable liquid. A foam’s quick action in a fire can mean the difference between life and death. As lawsuits pile up and government pressure rises, firefighting-foam makers reconsider the environmental cost of fluorosurfactants. More:

10/01/2019 -

A new study suggests certain types of consumer behaviors, including flossing with Oral-B Glide dental floss, contribute to elevated levels in the body of toxic PFAS chemicals. PFAS are water- and grease-proof substances that have been linked with numerous health problems. The findings provide new insight into how these chemicals end up in people's bodies and how consumers can limit their exposures by modifying their behavior. More:


Dental flossing and other behaviors linked with higher levels of toxic chemicals in the body

A new study suggests certain types of consumer behaviors, including flossing with Oral-B Glide dental floss, contribute to elevated levels in the body of toxic PFAS chemicals. PFAS are water- and grease-proof substances that have been linked with numerous health problems. The findings provide new insight into how these chemicals end up in people's bodies and how consumers can limit their exposures by modifying their behavior. More:

09/01/2019 -

A purported "eco-friendly" flame retardant breaks down into smaller, possibly harmful chemicals when exposed to heat and ultraviolet light, according to a study from German researchers. The study, published today in Environmental Science and Technology, is the first to show that a popular insulation flame retardant degrades into dozens of smaller chemicals and casts doubt that the "green" flame retardant is as harmless as touted. More:


“Environmentally friendly” flame retardants break down into potentially toxic chemicals

A purported "eco-friendly" flame retardant breaks down into smaller, possibly harmful chemicals when exposed to heat and ultraviolet light, according to a study from German researchers. The study, published today in Environmental Science and Technology, is the first to show that a popular insulation flame retardant degrades into dozens of smaller chemicals and casts doubt that the "green" flame retardant is as harmless as touted. More:

09/01/2019 -

In eastern Washington, a push to clean PCBs from its namesake river faces a dirty legacy and global pollution problem. More:


A toxic past and present on the Spokane River

In eastern Washington, a push to clean PCBs from its namesake river faces a dirty legacy and global pollution problem. More:

02/01/2019 -

Synthetics created in the 20th century have become an evolutionary force, altering human biology and the web of life. Today, PCBs are a notorious class of global pollutants and carcinogens capable of interfering with human fertility, development, cognition and immunity. Though human-made, biology recognises and can even interact with them. PCBs are everywhere, and by design, they endure. Scientists now call most PCBs legacy contaminants – enduring poisons from the past. More:


Time-bombing the future

Synthetics created in the 20th century have become an evolutionary force, altering human biology and the web of life. Today, PCBs are a notorious class of global pollutants and carcinogens capable of interfering with human fertility, development, cognition and immunity. Though human-made, biology recognises and can even interact with them. PCBs are everywhere, and by design, they endure. Scientists now call most PCBs legacy contaminants – enduring poisons from the past. More:

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