POPs in the news

03/10/2017 -

A new study provides disturbing evidence that children’s exposure to household insecticides is linked to higher risks of childhood leukemia and lymphoma, the most common cancers in children. The analysis also found an association between use of outdoor herbicides to lawns and gardens and higher risks of leukemia. More:


Study Links Childhood Cancer and In-Home Pesticide Use

A new study provides disturbing evidence that children’s exposure to household insecticides is linked to higher risks of childhood leukemia and lymphoma, the most common cancers in children. The analysis also found an association between use of outdoor herbicides to lawns and gardens and higher risks of leukemia. More:

02/10/2017 -

Perfluorooctanoic acid, widely used for decades in the making of nonstick coatings like Teflon and a variety of other consumer products, is considered toxic even in tiny amounts. PFOA has been linked to cancer, birth defects and immune system dysfunction. In 2006, eight major chemical companies, including 3M and DuPont, entered into a “voluntary stewardship agreement” to phase out the production and use of PFOA by 2015. In its place, the industry switched to other chemicals in the same family that were deemed less hazardous. But lately experts have begun to believe that these new chemicals also pose grave threats to human health. More:


Trading old hazards for new? Mystery shrouds chemicals that replaced PFOA

Perfluorooctanoic acid, widely used for decades in the making of nonstick coatings like Teflon and a variety of other consumer products, is considered toxic even in tiny amounts. PFOA has been linked to cancer, birth defects and immune system dysfunction. In 2006, eight major chemical companies, including 3M and DuPont, entered into a “voluntary stewardship agreement” to phase out the production and use of PFOA by 2015. In its place, the industry switched to other chemicals in the same family that were deemed less hazardous. But lately experts have begun to believe that these new chemicals also pose grave threats to human health. More:

01/10/2017 -

In the 1960s, Wolverine used the 76-acre undeveloped land as a dump site for hazardous sludge waste generated by its former tannery in Rockford, where the company treated pigskin with Scotchgard, a fabric protector that repels water and stains. 3M developed Scotchgard in 1956 and two years later, Wolverine used it to develop a pigskin nubuck leather for Hush Puppies. Six decades later, that innovation's toxic legacy has surfaced in local drinking water. More:


Cancer, thyroid problems plague Wolverine dump neighbors

In the 1960s, Wolverine used the 76-acre undeveloped land as a dump site for hazardous sludge waste generated by its former tannery in Rockford, where the company treated pigskin with Scotchgard, a fabric protector that repels water and stains. 3M developed Scotchgard in 1956 and two years later, Wolverine used it to develop a pigskin nubuck leather for Hush Puppies. Six decades later, that innovation's toxic legacy has surfaced in local drinking water. More:

29/09/2017 -

U.S. Federal regulators urged manufacturers to stop using hazardous flame retardants that are known to cause health problems. The technical name of the chemical additives is Non-Polymeric Organohalogen Flame Retardants. More:


CPSC to manufacturers: Toxic flame retardants ill advised in mattresses, TVs, furniture

U.S. Federal regulators urged manufacturers to stop using hazardous flame retardants that are known to cause health problems. The technical name of the chemical additives is Non-Polymeric Organohalogen Flame Retardants. More:

18/09/2017 -

A systematic literature review and meta-analysis on the association between exposure to the pesticide DDT and its metabolites and obesity reach to the conclusion that p,p′-DDT and p,p′-DDE can be classified as “presumed” to be obesogenic for humans, based on a moderate level of primary human evidence, a moderate level of primary in vivo evidence, and a moderate level of supporting evidence from in vivo and in vitro studies. More:


Association between Exposure to DDT and Its Metabolite DDE with Obesity: Integrated Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

A systematic literature review and meta-analysis on the association between exposure to the pesticide DDT and its metabolites and obesity reach to the conclusion that p,p′-DDT and p,p′-DDE can be classified as “presumed” to be obesogenic for humans, based on a moderate level of primary human evidence, a moderate level of primary in vivo evidence, and a moderate level of supporting evidence from in vivo and in vitro studies. More:

09/09/2017 -

The U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry tasked with protecting Americans from health threats is facing growing pressure to perform a nationwide health study on perfluorinated compounds — unregulated chemicals being found in drinking water supplies across the country, including locally. More:


Pressure growing on feds to do PFC health study

The U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry tasked with protecting Americans from health threats is facing growing pressure to perform a nationwide health study on perfluorinated compounds — unregulated chemicals being found in drinking water supplies across the country, including locally. More:

23/08/2017 -

Combined exposures to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) may exceed acceptable levels in breastfeeding infants and in small children even for moderate (vs. high) exposure scenarios, according to a study. The study also suggests that acceptable levels of combined PBDEs may be exceeded in adults whose diets are high in fish and corroborates reports from several epidemiological studies of associations between PBDE exposures and neurobehavioral outcomes. More:


A Human Mixture Risk Assessment for Neurodevelopmental Toxicity Associated with Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers Used as Flame Retardants

Combined exposures to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) may exceed acceptable levels in breastfeeding infants and in small children even for moderate (vs. high) exposure scenarios, according to a study. The study also suggests that acceptable levels of combined PBDEs may be exceeded in adults whose diets are high in fish and corroborates reports from several epidemiological studies of associations between PBDE exposures and neurobehavioral outcomes. More:

03/08/2017 -

Increased exposure among pregnant women to a class of flame-retardant chemicals found in older furniture and other everyday consumer products is linked to lower IQs in their children. Examining data from nearly 3,000 mother-child pairs from previous studies done around the world, researchers concluded that every tenfold increase in women’s exposure during pregnancy to chemicals known as polybrominated diphenyl ethers, or PBDEs, was associated with a 3.7-point decrease in their children’s IQ. More:


Flame retardants linked to lower child IQ

Increased exposure among pregnant women to a class of flame-retardant chemicals found in older furniture and other everyday consumer products is linked to lower IQs in their children. Examining data from nearly 3,000 mother-child pairs from previous studies done around the world, researchers concluded that every tenfold increase in women’s exposure during pregnancy to chemicals known as polybrominated diphenyl ethers, or PBDEs, was associated with a 3.7-point decrease in their children’s IQ. More:

01/08/2017 -

Many of the products we use every day contain chemicals of concern that may be harming our health. Many of these substances can be grouped into “Six Classes”, each containing similar chemicals. The Six Classes approach allows us to better understand these chemicals, their functions, where they are used, and how they can be avoided. It can prevent a cycle of “regrettable substitution,” whereby a phased out harmful chemical is replaced with a closely related chemical which may cause similar harm. More:


The Six Classes Approach to Reducing Chemical Harm

Many of the products we use every day contain chemicals of concern that may be harming our health. Many of these substances can be grouped into “Six Classes”, each containing similar chemicals. The Six Classes approach allows us to better understand these chemicals, their functions, where they are used, and how they can be avoided. It can prevent a cycle of “regrettable substitution,” whereby a phased out harmful chemical is replaced with a closely related chemical which may cause similar harm. More:

25/07/2017 -

FOUNTAIN — Water providers and residents south of Colorado Springs chafed as the U.S. Air Force on Tuesday unveiled a nine-month study verifying that firefighting foam used at Peterson Air Force Base contaminated water and soil with toxic perfluorinated chemicals at levels more than 1,000 times higher than a national health advisory limit. More:


Air Force admits firefighting foam that was spilled on base contaminated water and soil; people south of Colorado Springs left in lurch

FOUNTAIN — Water providers and residents south of Colorado Springs chafed as the U.S. Air Force on Tuesday unveiled a nine-month study verifying that firefighting foam used at Peterson Air Force Base contaminated water and soil with toxic perfluorinated chemicals at levels more than 1,000 times higher than a national health advisory limit. More:

18/07/2017 -

Making the chemical used in many nonstick frying pans, stain-resistant carpets and fire-fighting foams can pollute drinking water. Known as PFOA, this chemical can persist unchanged in the environment for years — perhaps for centuries or longer. And that can be troubling because studies have suggested that PFOA can harm the health of people and animals. But a new lab-made chemical can now remove PFOA from water. More:


New ‘magnet’ pulls pesky nonstick pollutants from drinking water

Making the chemical used in many nonstick frying pans, stain-resistant carpets and fire-fighting foams can pollute drinking water. Known as PFOA, this chemical can persist unchanged in the environment for years — perhaps for centuries or longer. And that can be troubling because studies have suggested that PFOA can harm the health of people and animals. But a new lab-made chemical can now remove PFOA from water. More:

06/07/2017 -

The EPA encouraged companies beginning in 2006 to phase out PFOA and related chemicals. The industry replaced them with GenX (perfluoro-2-propoxypropanoic acid) and other new-generation agents known as perfluorinated compounds, or PFAS. According to the industry, the new class is eliminated faster from the body, making them safer. However, several scientists have expressed concerns, citing their persistence in the environment including plant life, as well as a dearth of studies. More:


On U.S. Rivers, Teflon’s Old Cancer Ties Are Stoking New Fears

The EPA encouraged companies beginning in 2006 to phase out PFOA and related chemicals. The industry replaced them with GenX (perfluoro-2-propoxypropanoic acid) and other new-generation agents known as perfluorinated compounds, or PFAS. According to the industry, the new class is eliminated faster from the body, making them safer. However, several scientists have expressed concerns, citing their persistence in the environment including plant life, as well as a dearth of studies. More:

26/06/2017 -

Fish are a source of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the human diet. Although species, trophic level, and means of production are typically considered in predicting fish pollutant load, and thus recommendations of consumption, capture location is usually not accounted for. Capture location is an important consideration when assessing the level and risk of human exposure to POPs through ingestion of wild fish. More:


Geographic Differences in Persistent Organic Pollutant Levels of Yellowfin Tuna

Fish are a source of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the human diet. Although species, trophic level, and means of production are typically considered in predicting fish pollutant load, and thus recommendations of consumption, capture location is usually not accounted for. Capture location is an important consideration when assessing the level and risk of human exposure to POPs through ingestion of wild fish. More:

23/06/2017 -

In a warming world new opportunities open up for disease-bearing mosquitoes, spreading Ethiopia’s malaria zone to higher altitudes. For the malaria parasite, things are looking up. As climates change, and mountain regions warm, conditions become favourable not just for the parasite but for the mosquito that carries it. New research suggests that Ethiopia’s malaria zone could soon include the highlands, for centuries free of the disease’s ravages. More:


High-flying insects expand Ethiopia’s malaria zone

In a warming world new opportunities open up for disease-bearing mosquitoes, spreading Ethiopia’s malaria zone to higher altitudes. For the malaria parasite, things are looking up. As climates change, and mountain regions warm, conditions become favourable not just for the parasite but for the mosquito that carries it. New research suggests that Ethiopia’s malaria zone could soon include the highlands, for centuries free of the disease’s ravages. More:

08/06/2017 -

The known extent of the contamination of U.S. communities with PFCs – highly fluorinated toxic chemicals, also known as PFASs,[*] that have been linked to cancer, thyroid disease, weakened immunity and other health problems – continues to expand with no end in sight. New research from EWG and Northeastern University in Boston details PFC pollution in tap water supplies for 15 million Americans in 27 states and from more than four dozen industrial and military sources from Maine to California. More:


Mapping a contamination crisis - PFCs Pollute Tap Water for 15 Million People

The known extent of the contamination of U.S. communities with PFCs – highly fluorinated toxic chemicals, also known as PFASs,[*] that have been linked to cancer, thyroid disease, weakened immunity and other health problems – continues to expand with no end in sight. New research from EWG and Northeastern University in Boston details PFC pollution in tap water supplies for 15 million Americans in 27 states and from more than four dozen industrial and military sources from Maine to California. More:

05/06/2017 -

A study of the toxic perfluorinated chemicals found in water near U.S. military airports has measured drinking-water contamination at an undisclosed site at levels more than 100 times higher than a federal health advisory limit. Colorado School of Mines researchers also found that the carbon filters being installed by hard-hit communities — including Fountain and Widefield, south of Peterson Air Force Base — fail to fully remove the chemicals. More:


Toxic firefighting chemicals can’t be removed from water using standard filters, Mines research shows

A study of the toxic perfluorinated chemicals found in water near U.S. military airports has measured drinking-water contamination at an undisclosed site at levels more than 100 times higher than a federal health advisory limit. Colorado School of Mines researchers also found that the carbon filters being installed by hard-hit communities — including Fountain and Widefield, south of Peterson Air Force Base — fail to fully remove the chemicals. More:

01/06/2017 -

Some chemicals can mimic hormones, and in doing so wrongly turn on or off important bodily processes. Hormones are like the managers of the body’s organs and other tissues. These chemicals order cells to switch on or off some particular activity. Sometimes industrial chemicals and pollutants can mimic these managers. When such imposters enter the body, they can alter when or how an organism develops, what it looks like — even whether it gets some disease. More:


Explainer: What are endocrine disruptors?

Some chemicals can mimic hormones, and in doing so wrongly turn on or off important bodily processes. Hormones are like the managers of the body’s organs and other tissues. These chemicals order cells to switch on or off some particular activity. Sometimes industrial chemicals and pollutants can mimic these managers. When such imposters enter the body, they can alter when or how an organism develops, what it looks like — even whether it gets some disease. More:

31/05/2017 -

A research team at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) discovered that a common marine sponge hosts bacteria that produce toxic compounds that are nearly identical to man-made flame retardants. More:


Bacteria in marine sponges produce flame retardant-like compounds

A research team at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) discovered that a common marine sponge hosts bacteria that produce toxic compounds that are nearly identical to man-made flame retardants. More:

30/05/2017 -

Last year, one of Britain’s last surviving killer whales was found dead on the shores of a Scottish island. The whale, known as Lulu, had died after becoming entangled in fishing lines, but subsequent tests revealed that her body contained one of the highest levels ever recorded of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), a toxic chemical that many countries have banned since the 1970s. More:


Tackling a toxic legacy

Last year, one of Britain’s last surviving killer whales was found dead on the shores of a Scottish island. The whale, known as Lulu, had died after becoming entangled in fishing lines, but subsequent tests revealed that her body contained one of the highest levels ever recorded of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), a toxic chemical that many countries have banned since the 1970s. More:

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