POPs in the news

21/03/2018 -

If you only focus on diet and exercise you're missing a huge influence—chemicals in our environment that promote weight gain. More:


Why are we so fat despite our best efforts?

If you only focus on diet and exercise you're missing a huge influence—chemicals in our environment that promote weight gain. More:

20/03/2018 -

Le Muséum national d’histoire naturelle (MNHN) et le Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) annoncent les résultats principaux de deux réseaux de suivi des oiseaux sur le territoire français et évoquent un phénomène de « disparition massive », « proche de la catastrophe écologique ». « Les oiseaux des campagnes françaises disparaissent à une vitesse vertigineuse, précisent les deux institutions dans un communiqué commun. En moyenne, leurs populations se sont réduites d’un tiers en quinze ans. » More:


Les oiseaux disparaissent des campagnes françaises à une « vitesse vertigineuse »

Le Muséum national d’histoire naturelle (MNHN) et le Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS) annoncent les résultats principaux de deux réseaux de suivi des oiseaux sur le territoire français et évoquent un phénomène de « disparition massive », « proche de la catastrophe écologique ». « Les oiseaux des campagnes françaises disparaissent à une vitesse vertigineuse, précisent les deux institutions dans un communiqué commun. En moyenne, leurs populations se sont réduites d’un tiers en quinze ans. » More:

15/03/2018 -

Luring falcons to farms can keep pesky insects, rodents and other critters in check—putting a dent in poison and pesticide use. Summer carloads of sweet-toothed tourists, flush with cash and seeking local pies and jams, are an economic godsend in the cherry-growing region. Other hungry visitors are less welcome—voles, weevils, fruit flies, grasshoppers and pest birds do significant damage to local crops. More:


Protecting crops with predators instead of poisons

Luring falcons to farms can keep pesky insects, rodents and other critters in check—putting a dent in poison and pesticide use. Summer carloads of sweet-toothed tourists, flush with cash and seeking local pies and jams, are an economic godsend in the cherry-growing region. Other hungry visitors are less welcome—voles, weevils, fruit flies, grasshoppers and pest birds do significant damage to local crops. More:

09/03/2018 -

Glaciers, like many venerable objects, can act as time capsules. Like a dusty vinyl record holds an era’s songs, ice holds very old molecules—not just the H2O of snow, but traces of airborne particles like dust, ash, and chemicals that hitched a ride on falling flakes. In the Antarctic, Adélie penguins harbor consistent levels of the pesticide DDT. More:


Melting Glaciers Do More Than Raise Sea Levels

Glaciers, like many venerable objects, can act as time capsules. Like a dusty vinyl record holds an era’s songs, ice holds very old molecules—not just the H2O of snow, but traces of airborne particles like dust, ash, and chemicals that hitched a ride on falling flakes. In the Antarctic, Adélie penguins harbor consistent levels of the pesticide DDT. More:

05/03/2018 -

Chemours is facing demands from North Carolina regulators to curb atmospheric releases of fluorinated chemicals from the company’s factory. More:


Chemours told to cut fluorocarbon air pollution from North Carolina plant

Chemours is facing demands from North Carolina regulators to curb atmospheric releases of fluorinated chemicals from the company’s factory. More:

01/03/2018 -

Pesticides accumulate in bodies with high fat content. This conclusion has been reported by scientists who have been studying seabirds and marine mammals of the Sea of Okhotsk and the Bering Sea for several years. In a scientific article, the authors presented the results of a study of organochlorine pesticide (OCP) build-up in the bodies of seabirds and marine mammals living in the north-western part of the Pacific Ocean. More:


Pesticides found to accumulate in fat tissue

Pesticides accumulate in bodies with high fat content. This conclusion has been reported by scientists who have been studying seabirds and marine mammals of the Sea of Okhotsk and the Bering Sea for several years. In a scientific article, the authors presented the results of a study of organochlorine pesticide (OCP) build-up in the bodies of seabirds and marine mammals living in the north-western part of the Pacific Ocean. More:

14/02/2018 -

The study is the first to link the group of chemicals, PFASs [perfluoroalkyl substances], to weight gain and obesity, and suggests that exposure to the toxics may counteract weight loss efforts by slowing down people's metabolism. More:


Another potential PFAS problem: Weight gain

The study is the first to link the group of chemicals, PFASs [perfluoroalkyl substances], to weight gain and obesity, and suggests that exposure to the toxics may counteract weight loss efforts by slowing down people's metabolism. More:

13/02/2018 -

Chemicals known as perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS)—used frequently in fast-food wrappers and other products for their oil- and water-repellant properties—have been linked to hormone disruption, immune dysfunction, high cholesterol and even cancer. Now, a new study suggests that exposure to the chemicals could make it harder to keep weight off after dieting. More:


Environmental Chemicals Found in Non-Stick Pans Are Linked to Weight Gain

Chemicals known as perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS)—used frequently in fast-food wrappers and other products for their oil- and water-repellant properties—have been linked to hormone disruption, immune dysfunction, high cholesterol and even cancer. Now, a new study suggests that exposure to the chemicals could make it harder to keep weight off after dieting. More:

11/02/2018 -

An investigative news series about perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) or C8, associated compounds such as PFOS and GenX, and their negative impact on human health. More:


The Teflon Toxin

An investigative news series about perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) or C8, associated compounds such as PFOS and GenX, and their negative impact on human health. More:

PFOA and PFOS are only the best-known members of a very dangerous class of chemicals

06/02/2018 -

In regions of the world threatened by malaria, bed nets treated with insecticides are an increasingly common public health tool to fend off mosquitos. But there is growing evidence that the nets, often provided for free or at a subsidized price by hospitals and aid organizations, are being put to other uses, including fishing. More:


Fishing with insecticide-laced mosquito nets is a global phenomenon

In regions of the world threatened by malaria, bed nets treated with insecticides are an increasingly common public health tool to fend off mosquitos. But there is growing evidence that the nets, often provided for free or at a subsidized price by hospitals and aid organizations, are being put to other uses, including fishing. More:

02/02/2018 -

Teflon pans have existed since the 1960s. And while Teflon’s powers of food repulsion are a source of wonderment, the chemical engineers behind them were unable to endow them with the equally magical property of indestructibility. More:


The chemical industry doesn’t want you to be afraid of Teflon pans. You should be

Teflon pans have existed since the 1960s. And while Teflon’s powers of food repulsion are a source of wonderment, the chemical engineers behind them were unable to endow them with the equally magical property of indestructibility. More:

31/01/2018 -

Long strips of bright wildflowers are being planted through crop fields to boost the natural predators of pests and potentially cut pesticide spraying. Concern over the environmental damage caused by pesticides has grown rapidly in recent years. Using wildflower margins to support insects including hoverflies, parasitic wasps and ground beetles has been shown to slash pest numbers in crops and even increase yields.


Stripes of wildflowers across farm fields could cut pesticide spraying

Long strips of bright wildflowers are being planted through crop fields to boost the natural predators of pests and potentially cut pesticide spraying. Concern over the environmental damage caused by pesticides has grown rapidly in recent years. Using wildflower margins to support insects including hoverflies, parasitic wasps and ground beetles has been shown to slash pest numbers in crops and even increase yields.

30/01/2018 -

Plastic used in some second-hand toys could pose a health risk for children as they don't meet the most up-to-date safety guidelines, a study has found. Scientists tested 200 used plastic toys they found in nurseries, thrift shops and homes across England's south-west for nine hazardous elements. Twenty toys had traces of all nine elements. More:


Second-hand toys could harm children, scientists discover

Plastic used in some second-hand toys could pose a health risk for children as they don't meet the most up-to-date safety guidelines, a study has found. Scientists tested 200 used plastic toys they found in nurseries, thrift shops and homes across England's south-west for nine hazardous elements. Twenty toys had traces of all nine elements. More:

19/01/2018 -

A new study has found a link between persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and high cholesterol levels among Inuit. The study follows earlier work that found a similar link between the group of chemicals and some kinds of diabetes. That group of pollutants includes well-known chemicals like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and the pesticide DDT. More:


Scientists find link between group of pollutants and health problems in Inuit

A new study has found a link between persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and high cholesterol levels among Inuit. The study follows earlier work that found a similar link between the group of chemicals and some kinds of diabetes. That group of pollutants includes well-known chemicals like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and the pesticide DDT. More:

18/01/2018 -

The Czech environmental group Arnika is ringing alarm bells. According to the results of a recent study it conducted, some children’s toys and grooming accessories, such as hair brushes, sold in the EU contain toxic substances. Arnika’s Karolína Brabcová says this is an unfortunate side product of the drive to promote plastics recycling. More:


The downside of plastics recycling: toxins in children’s toys

The Czech environmental group Arnika is ringing alarm bells. According to the results of a recent study it conducted, some children’s toys and grooming accessories, such as hair brushes, sold in the EU contain toxic substances. Arnika’s Karolína Brabcová says this is an unfortunate side product of the drive to promote plastics recycling. More:

18/01/2018 -

PFAS is an acronym for a group of industrial chemicals known as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances. They've been used since the '50s, in everything from firefighting foam to fast-food paper wrappers to stain-resistant textiles and carpeting, waterproof shoes and boots, non-stick pots and pans, and more. Studies have shown PFAS to be linked to various health problems — including a higher risk of some cancers. More:


Am I at risk? How do you clean it up? A PFAS expert answers basic questions

PFAS is an acronym for a group of industrial chemicals known as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances. They've been used since the '50s, in everything from firefighting foam to fast-food paper wrappers to stain-resistant textiles and carpeting, waterproof shoes and boots, non-stick pots and pans, and more. Studies have shown PFAS to be linked to various health problems — including a higher risk of some cancers. More:

10/01/2018 -

An online database of corporate memos, meeting minutes, and letters related to a variety of toxic substances aims to augment public health and safety. More:


In ToxicDocs.org, a Treasure Trove of Industry Secrets

An online database of corporate memos, meeting minutes, and letters related to a variety of toxic substances aims to augment public health and safety. More:

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