POPs in the news

06/02/2019 -

Researchers are struggling to assess the dangers of nondegradable compounds used in clothes, foams and food wrappings. The water looks unremarkable, but it is contaminated with synthetic compounds called fluorochemicals, which have been generating increasing concern around the world. More:


Tainted water: the scientists tracing thousands of fluorinated chemicals in our environment

Researchers are struggling to assess the dangers of nondegradable compounds used in clothes, foams and food wrappings. The water looks unremarkable, but it is contaminated with synthetic compounds called fluorochemicals, which have been generating increasing concern around the world. More:

06/02/2019 -

Study of more than 1,000 mothers and children in Europe links common chemicals to reduced lung function. Children exposed to three different chemical classes — parabens, phthalates and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS)—before birth and shortly after had reduced lung function at 6 and 12 years old, according to a study. More:


PFAS and phthalate chemical exposure early in life may hamper kids’ lungs

Study of more than 1,000 mothers and children in Europe links common chemicals to reduced lung function. Children exposed to three different chemical classes — parabens, phthalates and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS)—before birth and shortly after had reduced lung function at 6 and 12 years old, according to a study. More:

01/02/2019 -

DuPont-spinoff Chemours is sending industrial waste from the Netherlands to North Carolina. The waste in question comes from the production of the toxic chemical GenX, DuPont’s replacement for the surfactant PFOA, which was long used in the production of Teflon and many other products. More:


Chemours is using the U.S. as an unregulated dump for Europe's toxic GenX waste

DuPont-spinoff Chemours is sending industrial waste from the Netherlands to North Carolina. The waste in question comes from the production of the toxic chemical GenX, DuPont’s replacement for the surfactant PFOA, which was long used in the production of Teflon and many other products. More:

30/01/2019 -

They want financial aid, medical facilities, schools for their disabled children and a tribunal to book those responsible for the pesticide tragedy. More:


‘We want justice’: Victims of endosulfan poisoning in Kerala set to start hunger strike

They want financial aid, medical facilities, schools for their disabled children and a tribunal to book those responsible for the pesticide tragedy. More:

28/01/2019 -

Globally, 255 different weeds have developed resistance to 163 different herbicides. These weeds compete with crops for space, water, and nutrients in the soil—and they’re beginning to impact many farmers’ yields. More:


Australia Might Have the Answer to Herbicide-Resistant ‘Superweeds’

Globally, 255 different weeds have developed resistance to 163 different herbicides. These weeds compete with crops for space, water, and nutrients in the soil—and they’re beginning to impact many farmers’ yields. More:

27/01/2019 -

Detection of a toxic chemical in a northeastern Wisconsin wastewater treatment plant’s sludge has prompted a halt to application of the material on nearby farms and raised broader concerns about how public sewer systems across the state may be spreading the chemical across the landscape. More:


Wisconsin case shows how sewage plants spread unregulated toxins across landscape

Detection of a toxic chemical in a northeastern Wisconsin wastewater treatment plant’s sludge has prompted a halt to application of the material on nearby farms and raised broader concerns about how public sewer systems across the state may be spreading the chemical across the landscape. More:

27/01/2019 -

the U.S. military is moving ahead with plans to collect and destroy unused firefighting foam that contains the hazardous chemicals PFOS and PFOA. But in trying to solve one environmental problem related to these persistent chemicals, which have caused massive drinking water contamination, the Defense Department may be creating another. More:


The Teflon Toxin series: Incinerating toxic firefighting foam

the U.S. military is moving ahead with plans to collect and destroy unused firefighting foam that contains the hazardous chemicals PFOS and PFOA. But in trying to solve one environmental problem related to these persistent chemicals, which have caused massive drinking water contamination, the Defense Department may be creating another. More:

14/01/2019 -

A concentrated formula, diluted with water, forms a heat-resistant foam blanket that rapidly cools and smothers most hydrocarbon-fueled fires. The fluorine content helps create a low-surface-tension film that rapidly spreads across the surface of a flammable liquid. A foam’s quick action in a fire can mean the difference between life and death. As lawsuits pile up and government pressure rises, firefighting-foam makers reconsider the environmental cost of fluorosurfactants. More:


What is the price of fire safety?

A concentrated formula, diluted with water, forms a heat-resistant foam blanket that rapidly cools and smothers most hydrocarbon-fueled fires. The fluorine content helps create a low-surface-tension film that rapidly spreads across the surface of a flammable liquid. A foam’s quick action in a fire can mean the difference between life and death. As lawsuits pile up and government pressure rises, firefighting-foam makers reconsider the environmental cost of fluorosurfactants. More:

10/01/2019 -

A new study suggests certain types of consumer behaviors, including flossing with Oral-B Glide dental floss, contribute to elevated levels in the body of toxic PFAS chemicals. PFAS are water- and grease-proof substances that have been linked with numerous health problems. The findings provide new insight into how these chemicals end up in people's bodies and how consumers can limit their exposures by modifying their behavior. More:


Dental flossing and other behaviors linked with higher levels of toxic chemicals in the body

A new study suggests certain types of consumer behaviors, including flossing with Oral-B Glide dental floss, contribute to elevated levels in the body of toxic PFAS chemicals. PFAS are water- and grease-proof substances that have been linked with numerous health problems. The findings provide new insight into how these chemicals end up in people's bodies and how consumers can limit their exposures by modifying their behavior. More:

09/01/2019 -

A purported "eco-friendly" flame retardant breaks down into smaller, possibly harmful chemicals when exposed to heat and ultraviolet light, according to a study from German researchers. The study, published today in Environmental Science and Technology, is the first to show that a popular insulation flame retardant degrades into dozens of smaller chemicals and casts doubt that the "green" flame retardant is as harmless as touted. More:


“Environmentally friendly” flame retardants break down into potentially toxic chemicals

A purported "eco-friendly" flame retardant breaks down into smaller, possibly harmful chemicals when exposed to heat and ultraviolet light, according to a study from German researchers. The study, published today in Environmental Science and Technology, is the first to show that a popular insulation flame retardant degrades into dozens of smaller chemicals and casts doubt that the "green" flame retardant is as harmless as touted. More:

09/01/2019 -

In eastern Washington, a push to clean PCBs from its namesake river faces a dirty legacy and global pollution problem. More:


A toxic past and present on the Spokane River

In eastern Washington, a push to clean PCBs from its namesake river faces a dirty legacy and global pollution problem. More:

02/01/2019 -

Synthetics created in the 20th century have become an evolutionary force, altering human biology and the web of life. Today, PCBs are a notorious class of global pollutants and carcinogens capable of interfering with human fertility, development, cognition and immunity. Though human-made, biology recognises and can even interact with them. PCBs are everywhere, and by design, they endure. Scientists now call most PCBs legacy contaminants – enduring poisons from the past. More:


Time-bombing the future

Synthetics created in the 20th century have become an evolutionary force, altering human biology and the web of life. Today, PCBs are a notorious class of global pollutants and carcinogens capable of interfering with human fertility, development, cognition and immunity. Though human-made, biology recognises and can even interact with them. PCBs are everywhere, and by design, they endure. Scientists now call most PCBs legacy contaminants – enduring poisons from the past. More:

15/12/2018 -

The closer we look, the more complicated the picture appears. Studies have shown that environmental exposures can modify the expression of genes (without changing the coding sequence), leading to diseases and dysfunctions. This suggests that there are other factors, so far hidden, triggering such a profound increase in these so-called lifestyle disorders. More:


Invisible pollutants and the tipping point for endocrine disruption

The closer we look, the more complicated the picture appears. Studies have shown that environmental exposures can modify the expression of genes (without changing the coding sequence), leading to diseases and dysfunctions. This suggests that there are other factors, so far hidden, triggering such a profound increase in these so-called lifestyle disorders. More:

13/12/2018 -

Many popular carpet brands, including those widely used in affordable housing projects, contain toxic chemicals that put people’s health at risk while in use and when the carpets are disposed of, according to a new report by three environmental advocacy groups. The findings are particularly worrisome given that babies and children often spend considerable time crawling and playing on carpets, and they are most sensitive to the potential health consequences from the toxins detected. More:


Carpets Cited as a Health Hazard, Especially for Children and Poor Communities

Many popular carpet brands, including those widely used in affordable housing projects, contain toxic chemicals that put people’s health at risk while in use and when the carpets are disposed of, according to a new report by three environmental advocacy groups. The findings are particularly worrisome given that babies and children often spend considerable time crawling and playing on carpets, and they are most sensitive to the potential health consequences from the toxins detected. More:

10/12/2018 -

New Jersey’s efforts to protect the public from a class of toxic chemicals in drinking water are being threatened by the emergence of substitutes that may be just as hazardous to human health, experts argue. At a public roundtable on PFAS chemicals, scientists said chemical manufacturers have responded to increasing regulation of the chemicals by New Jersey and other states by introducing so-called short-chain alternatives, such as the chemical Gen-X, that serve the same purposes but have not been fully vetted by regulators. More:


New chemical substitutes threaten to undermine NJ’s cutting-edge rules on PFAS

New Jersey’s efforts to protect the public from a class of toxic chemicals in drinking water are being threatened by the emergence of substitutes that may be just as hazardous to human health, experts argue. At a public roundtable on PFAS chemicals, scientists said chemical manufacturers have responded to increasing regulation of the chemicals by New Jersey and other states by introducing so-called short-chain alternatives, such as the chemical Gen-X, that serve the same purposes but have not been fully vetted by regulators. More:

06/12/2018 -

Chemicals are manufactured for use in almost everything with which humans come into contact including food, plastics, personal care products, clothing and building materials. In addition, manufactured chemicals contaminate our environment in ways not always anticipated in air, dust, food and water. More:


The consequences of status quo chemical policy are becoming increasingly clear

Chemicals are manufactured for use in almost everything with which humans come into contact including food, plastics, personal care products, clothing and building materials. In addition, manufactured chemicals contaminate our environment in ways not always anticipated in air, dust, food and water. More:

03/12/2018 -

For parents of small children, car seats are an integral part of day-to-day life. Making sure children are safely buckled and secure is the first step for any car ride, and it helps to ease parent’s minds before hitting the road. However, a new study conducted by researchers from Indiana University and The Ecology Center should serve as a warning for many parents. The researchers found that many child’s car seats contain toxic flame retardants. More:


Children's car seats found to contain toxic flame retardants

For parents of small children, car seats are an integral part of day-to-day life. Making sure children are safely buckled and secure is the first step for any car ride, and it helps to ease parent’s minds before hitting the road. However, a new study conducted by researchers from Indiana University and The Ecology Center should serve as a warning for many parents. The researchers found that many child’s car seats contain toxic flame retardants. More:

30/11/2018 -
There's a new reason to be concerned about toxic chemicals used in nonstick pans, waterproof products, and firefighting foam: PFOA and PFOS impair male reproductive health, according to a study. More:

PFOA and PFOS cause lower sperm counts and smaller penises, study finds

There's a new reason to be concerned about toxic chemicals used in nonstick pans, waterproof products, and firefighting foam: PFOA and PFOS impair male reproductive health, according to a study. More:
29/11/2018 -
An investigation found that manufacturing sources are sending one version of the "forever chemicals" PFAS at up to 20,000 times the allowed amount into wastewater systems that discharge it into the state's lakes, rivers and, ultimately, threatening drinking water supplies for millions of people. More:

Businesses discharging PFAS into Michigan's waterways

An investigation found that manufacturing sources are sending one version of the "forever chemicals" PFAS at up to 20,000 times the allowed amount into wastewater systems that discharge it into the state's lakes, rivers and, ultimately, threatening drinking water supplies for millions of people. More:
27/11/2018 -
Trillions of bugs flitting from flower to flower pollinate some three-quarters of our food crops, a service worth as much as $500 billion every year. By eating and being eaten, insects turn plants into protein and power the growth of uncountable species — including freshwater fish and a majority of birds — that rely on them for food, and the creatures that eat those creatures. More:

The Insect Apocalypse Is Here

Trillions of bugs flitting from flower to flower pollinate some three-quarters of our food crops, a service worth as much as $500 billion every year. By eating and being eaten, insects turn plants into protein and power the growth of uncountable species — including freshwater fish and a majority of birds — that rely on them for food, and the creatures that eat those creatures. More:
Page 1 of 30First   Previous   [1]  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  Next   Last   

DISCLAIMER

This page may contain advice, opinions and statements of various information and content providers, and in particular extracts from electronic journals, newspapers and magazines related to the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants. Please note that they do not necessarily reflect the views, decisions or policies of the Secretariat of the Stockholm Convention (the Secretariat), of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) or of the United Nations (UN). Therefore, the Secretariat, UNEP or the UN do not represent or endorse the accuracy or reliability of any advice, opinion, statement or other information provided by any information provider, or by any other person or entity. Reliance upon any such advice, opinion, statement, or other information shall also be at the User's own risk. Neither the Secretariat/UNEP/the UN, nor their respective affiliates, agents, employees, information providers or content providers, shall be liable to any User or anyone else for any inaccuracy, error, omission, interruption, deletion, defect, alteration of or use of any content herein, or for its timeliness or completeness, nor shall they be liable for any failure of performance, computer virus or communication line failure, regardless of cause, or for any damages resulting therefrom.

For more information please consult the Terms of Use of the Stockholm Convention website.