POPs in the news

19/12/2019 -

Why are endocrine-disrupting chemicals different from other toxic exposures? In these videos, you will learn about how chemicals interfere with hormone biology and endocrine systems, and how principles of endocrinology can be applied to toxic chemical exposures. More:


An Introduction to Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals

Why are endocrine-disrupting chemicals different from other toxic exposures? In these videos, you will learn about how chemicals interfere with hormone biology and endocrine systems, and how principles of endocrinology can be applied to toxic chemical exposures. More:

17/12/2019 -

New data shows that rainwater in some parts of the US contains high enough levels of potentially toxic per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) to possibly affect human health and may, if found in drinking water, in some cases be high enough to trigger regulatory action. More:

Monitoring & Exposure


Rainwater in parts of US contains high levels of PFAS chemical, says study

New data shows that rainwater in some parts of the US contains high enough levels of potentially toxic per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) to possibly affect human health and may, if found in drinking water, in some cases be high enough to trigger regulatory action. More:

Monitoring & Exposure

12/12/2019 -

Lansing became the first city in Michigan to send its PFAS-based fire-fighting foam to a hazardous waste landfill. Stacks of five-gallon buckets, totaling 1,260 gallons and some dating back from at least decade ago, were carted to trucks operated by US Ecology.More:


Disposal begins for Michigan’s fire-fighting foam containing PFAS

Lansing became the first city in Michigan to send its PFAS-based fire-fighting foam to a hazardous waste landfill. Stacks of five-gallon buckets, totaling 1,260 gallons and some dating back from at least decade ago, were carted to trucks operated by US Ecology.More:

12/12/2019 -

People and the environment are exposed to a wide variety of extremely persistent chemicals known as PFAS, many of which are known to be toxic. A briefing by the European Environment Agency presents an overview of these chemicals, which continue to accumulate in people and the environment. More:


PFAS pollution is widespread in Europe but risks are still poorly understood

People and the environment are exposed to a wide variety of extremely persistent chemicals known as PFAS, many of which are known to be toxic. A briefing by the European Environment Agency presents an overview of these chemicals, which continue to accumulate in people and the environment. More:

10/12/2019 -

They’re a family of chemicals famous enough to have a Hollywood movie made about them. They are also known to cause cancer, thyroid problems and other serious health issues. And worryingly for environmental justice advocates and disadvantaged communities, growing data highlighting the per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) problem nationally and in California suggest that the impact may be hardest felt by those on the lower rungs of the economic ladder. More:

Research on PFAS

Topic of Cancer: How PFAS Threaten Our Water

They’re a family of chemicals famous enough to have a Hollywood movie made about them. They are also known to cause cancer, thyroid problems and other serious health issues. And worryingly for environmental justice advocates and disadvantaged communities, growing data highlighting the per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) problem nationally and in California suggest that the impact may be hardest felt by those on the lower rungs of the economic ladder. More:

Research on PFAS
04/12/2019 -

With heightened awareness around the country about the health effects of PFAS, calculations for what artificial turf installations actually cost over their full life-time may send a shock through the artificial turf industry. Intrepid reporting revealed that the so-called 'forever chemicals'—PFAS (perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances)—are used in the production of artificial turf. More:


Hidden gotcha in artificial turf installations - PFAS

With heightened awareness around the country about the health effects of PFAS, calculations for what artificial turf installations actually cost over their full life-time may send a shock through the artificial turf industry. Intrepid reporting revealed that the so-called 'forever chemicals'—PFAS (perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances)—are used in the production of artificial turf. More:

03/12/2019 -

The harbour porpoise calves in waters around the UK carry a more neurotoxic cocktail of pollutants than their mothers, a study suggests. New research shows that the 209 variants of Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have varied levels of persistence in marine mammals. More:


UK porpoise calves exposed to chemical pollutants in mothers’ milk

The harbour porpoise calves in waters around the UK carry a more neurotoxic cocktail of pollutants than their mothers, a study suggests. New research shows that the 209 variants of Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have varied levels of persistence in marine mammals. More:

26/11/2019 -

PFAS stands for per or polyfluoroalkyl substances, a group of hundreds of manmade chemicals that are used for a variety of industrial and commercial uses ranging from the firefighting foam used at airstrips and on military bases to waterproof or nonstick products, such as stain repellent, cleaning products or food packaging. More:


What you need to know about PFAS or 'forever' chemicals

PFAS stands for per or polyfluoroalkyl substances, a group of hundreds of manmade chemicals that are used for a variety of industrial and commercial uses ranging from the firefighting foam used at airstrips and on military bases to waterproof or nonstick products, such as stain repellent, cleaning products or food packaging. More:

22/11/2019 -

Exported Australian plastic waste may be "poisoning" villages in Indonesia, according to a new report which found eggs near dumping grounds had some of the highest levels of dioxins recorded in Asia. More:


Australian plastic among waste 'contaminating' Indonesian food chains, report finds

Exported Australian plastic waste may be "poisoning" villages in Indonesia, according to a new report which found eggs near dumping grounds had some of the highest levels of dioxins recorded in Asia. More:

18/11/2019 -

In 1973, an accident at a chemical plant in the small town of St. Louis in the middle of Michigan’s mitten triggered one of the largest mass poisonings in American history.. Before the crisis was over, nearly the entire state population – about 9 million residents – ate food contaminated with a toxic fire retardant called PBB that workers erroneously mixed into cattle feed. More:


"Here we are again:" Decades after PBB crisis, echoes seen in current PFAS crisis

In 1973, an accident at a chemical plant in the small town of St. Louis in the middle of Michigan’s mitten triggered one of the largest mass poisonings in American history. Before the crisis was over, nearly the entire state population – about 9 million residents – ate food contaminated with a toxic fire retardant called PBB that workers erroneously mixed into cattle feed. More:

15/11/2019 -

A new study that sampled chicken eggs around sites in the country where plastic waste accumulates identified alarming levels of dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls long recognised as extremely injurious to human health. More:


Indonesia's food chain turns toxic as plastic waste exports flood in

A new study that sampled chicken eggs around sites in the country where plastic waste accumulates identified alarming levels of dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls long recognised as extremely injurious to human health. More:

13/11/2019 -

Waste-to-energy (WtE) incineration has been raised as a solution. While turning plastic waste into energy may sound good, it creates more pollution and delays a necessary transition to a circular economy. More:


Why municipal waste-to-energy incineration is not the answer to NZ’s plastic waste crisis

Waste-to-energy (WtE) incineration has been raised as a solution. While turning plastic waste into energy may sound good, it creates more pollution and delays a necessary transition to a circular economy. More:

10/11/2019 -

Searching for survivors in the wreckage of last year’s deadly Camp fire, the Marin county battalion chief, Jeremy Pierce, had to hear and feel his way through the debris. Black, murky smoke had disappeared entire streets in and near the small California town of Paradise. More:


'Nobody gets out without damage': what fighting fire does to the body

Searching for survivors in the wreckage of last year’s deadly Camp fire, the Marin county battalion chief, Jeremy Pierce, had to hear and feel his way through the debris. Black, murky smoke had disappeared entire streets in and near the small California town of Paradise. More:

08/11/2019 -

Herring is one of the most common species of fish in the Baltic Sea, but sales of it for human food are restricted by the EU. Lower concentrations of dioxins and PCB compounds could remove restrictions on selling and exporting this abundant fish species. Now most of the catch goes to feed fur animals and farmed fish, with dioxins removed during the process of making fishmeal. More:


Toxin levels in Baltic herring drop significantly, spurring export hopes

Herring is one of the most common species of fish in the Baltic Sea, but sales of it for human food are restricted by the EU. Lower concentrations of dioxins and PCB compounds could remove restrictions on selling and exporting this abundant fish species. Now most of the catch goes to feed fur animals and farmed fish, with dioxins removed during the process of making fishmeal. More:

08/11/2019 -

The chemicals called “PFAS” have been in the news a lot lately — like the recent revelation that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was allowing PFAS-contaminated water to be treated in Lowell and discharged into the Merrimack River, or the news that chemical giant 3M is suing the state of New Hampshire over the state’s strict PFAS drinking water standards. More:

Human Exposure and Health Effects Monitoring data Regulation Alternatives

What Are PFAS Chemicals, And Should I Be Freaking Out About Them?

The chemicals called “PFAS” have been in the news a lot lately — like the recent revelation that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was allowing PFAS-contaminated water to be treated in Lowell and discharged into the Merrimack River, or the news that chemical giant 3M is suing the state of New Hampshire over the state’s strict PFAS drinking water standards. More:

Human Exposure and Health Effects Monitoring data Regulation Alternatives
25/10/2019 -

A pesticide linked to cancer - chlordecone - was sprayed on banana crops on the islands for two decades and now nearly all the adult local residents have traces of it in their blood. More:


Pesticide poisoned French paradise islands in Caribbean

A pesticide linked to cancer - chlordecone - was sprayed on banana crops on the islands for two decades and now nearly all the adult local residents have traces of it in their blood. More:

24/10/2019 -

The widespread environmental contaminants known as PFAS cause multiple health problems in people, according to Linda Birnbaum, who retired as director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and the National Toxicology Program earlier this month. More:


Top Toxicologist Banned From Saying PFAS Causes Disease in Humans. She's saying it now

The widespread environmental contaminants known as PFAS cause multiple health problems in people, according to Linda Birnbaum, who retired as director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and the National Toxicology Program earlier this month. More:

23/10/2019 -

Disease ecologist Andrew MacDonald and his Stanford University colleague Erin Mordecai analyzed more than a decade of data showing the occurrences of malaria in nearly 800 villages, towns and cities across the Brazilian Amazon. They also looked at satellite-tracked deforestation over that same time frame. More:


Malaria surges in deforested parts of the Amazon, study finds

Disease ecologist Andrew MacDonald and his Stanford University colleague Erin Mordecai analyzed more than a decade of data showing the occurrences of malaria in nearly 800 villages, towns and cities across the Brazilian Amazon. They also looked at satellite-tracked deforestation over that same time frame. More:

22/10/2019 -

Flame retardants are everywhere from your TV to your couch to your car. In the U.S., we’ve largely switched out an old class of retardants with another class that may be much more toxic and widespread than what they were created to replace. More:


New Study Shows 'Everybody on the Planet' Is Exposed to Toxic Flame Retardants

Flame retardants are everywhere from your TV to your couch to your car. In the U.S., we’ve largely switched out an old class of retardants with another class that may be much more toxic and widespread than what they were created to replace. More:

16/10/2019 -

At first, teachers at Sky Valley Education Center simply evacuated students and used fans to clear the air when the fluorescent lights caught fire or smoked with noxious fumes. When black oil dripped onto desks and floors, they caught leaks with a bucket and duct-taped oil-stained carpets. Then came the tests that confirmed their suspicions about the light ballasts. More:


Toxic PCBs linger in schools; EPA, lawmakers fail to act

At first, teachers at Sky Valley Education Center simply evacuated students and used fans to clear the air when the fluorescent lights caught fire or smoked with noxious fumes. When black oil dripped onto desks and floors, they caught leaks with a bucket and duct-taped oil-stained carpets. Then came the tests that confirmed their suspicions about the light ballasts. More:

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