POPs in the news

23/09/2021 -

Hinkley, California, USA, 1952-1966: A Pacific Gas and Electric powerplant releases 1.4 billion liters (370 million gallons) of wastewater laced with carcinogenic chromium-6 into unlined ponds, polluting groundwater for the town’s 2,000 residents. The “novel entities” planetary boundary encapsulates all toxic and long-lived substances that humans release into the environment — from heavy metals and radioactive waste, to industrial chemicals and pesticides, even novel living organisms — which can threaten the stability of the Earth system. .More:

POPs chemicals Chemicals Pollution Chemicals Impact Chemicals Regulation

Novel chemical entities: Are we sleepwalking through a planetary boundary?

Hinkley, California, USA, 1952-1966: A Pacific Gas and Electric powerplant releases 1.4 billion liters (370 million gallons) of wastewater laced with carcinogenic chromium-6 into unlined ponds, polluting groundwater for the town’s 2,000 residents. The “novel entities” planetary boundary encapsulates all toxic and long-lived substances that humans release into the environment — from heavy metals and radioactive waste, to industrial chemicals and pesticides, even novel living organisms — which can threaten the stability of the Earth system. .More:

POPs chemicals Chemicals Pollution Chemicals Impact Chemicals Regulation
23/09/2021 -

The PFAS scandal surrounding the 3M factory in Antwerp has continued to unfold, teetering ever closer to the realms of absurdity. While Belgians are no strangers to surrealism, the scandal is as serious as it is ridiculous. As the plot progresses, its dramatic turns could make a worthy sequel to Mark Ruffalo’s Dark WatersDonkere Waters anyone? More:

Environmental Liability

Surreally serious: PFAS paralysis follows astonishing scandal

The PFAS scandal surrounding the 3M factory in Antwerp has continued to unfold, teetering ever closer to the realms of absurdity. While Belgians are no strangers to surrealism, the scandal is as serious as it is ridiculous. As the plot progresses, its dramatic turns could make a worthy sequel to Mark Ruffalo’s Dark WatersDonkere Waters anyone? More:

Environmental Liability
18/09/2021 -

The EPA gauges the potential risk posed by a chemical using two measures: how toxic the agency considers it and how much of the substance the public will likely be exposed to. More:


New Evidence of Corruption at EPA Chemicals Division

The EPA gauges the potential risk posed by a chemical using two measures: how toxic the agency considers it and how much of the substance the public will likely be exposed to. More:

17/09/2021 -

The Aarhus Convention is an international agreement that gives people the right to access information about the environment. It also promotes public participation in decision-making and in the preparation of environment-related policies. It provides access to justice on environmental matters, for individuals and NGOs. More:


The Aarhus Convention series: Part One

The Aarhus Convention is an international agreement that gives people the right to access information about the environment. It also promotes public participation in decision-making and in the preparation of environment-related policies. It provides access to justice on environmental matters, for individuals and NGOs. More:

16/09/2021 -

As evidence mounts that hamburger wrappers and other kinds of grease-proof packaging contaminate food with PFAS, states have started banning the toxic chemicals from food packaging. More:

PFAS in Food packaging PFAS-free food packaging

Alabama PFAS manufacturing plant creates the climate pollution of 125,000 cars

As evidence mounts that hamburger wrappers and other kinds of grease-proof packaging contaminate food with PFAS, states have started banning the toxic chemicals from food packaging. More:

PFAS in Food packaging PFAS-free food packaging
15/09/2021 -

The water had combined concentrations of PFOS and PFOA more than 13 times higher than Japan’s safety target, Ginowan city wrote in results published on its website. Ginowan city said it sampled water just outside Marine Corps Air Station Futenma’s fence line on Aug. 26, approximately two hours after the Marines began dumping treated wastewater into the public system. More:


Okinawa governor wants on-site scrutiny after water samples show toxic discharge from Marine base

The water had combined concentrations of PFOS and PFOA more than 13 times higher than Japan’s safety target, Ginowan city wrote in results published on its website. Ginowan city said it sampled water just outside Marine Corps Air Station Futenma’s fence line on Aug. 26, approximately two hours after the Marines began dumping treated wastewater into the public system. More:

14/09/2021 -

Used in everything from cosmetics to food packaging, PFAS also show up in paint (as a binding agent and to give a smooth finish), wood lacquers (for repelling oil and water, and stain resistance) and sealants. They are used in the top layer of solar panels, artificial grass and firefighting foams. More:

PFAS in human milk PFAS in articles and products PFAS Environmental Transport

‘Forever chemicals’: the hidden threat from the toxic PFAS on your shelf

Used in everything from cosmetics to food packaging, PFAS also show up in paint (as a binding agent and to give a smooth finish), wood lacquers (for repelling oil and water, and stain resistance) and sealants. They are used in the top layer of solar panels, artificial grass and firefighting foams. More:

PFAS in human milk PFAS in articles and products PFAS Environmental Transport
14/09/2021 -

Despite decades of research on per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), fundamental obstacles remain to addressing worldwide contamination by these chemicals and their associated impacts on environmental quality and health. Here, we propose six urgent questions relevant to science, technology, and policy that must be tackled to address the “PFAS problem”. More:


Addressing Urgent Questions for PFAS in the 21st Century

Despite decades of research on per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), fundamental obstacles remain to addressing worldwide contamination by these chemicals and their associated impacts on environmental quality and health. Here, we propose six urgent questions relevant to science, technology, and policy that must be tackled to address the “PFAS problem”. More:

09/09/2021 -

Firefighters are among those most highly exposed to harms from the toxic “forever chemicals” known as PFAS through their protective gear and firefighting foam, but many local fire departments lack the resources to switch to PFAS-free alternatives. More:

Firefighters Exposure to PFAS Alternatives to PFAS Community right to know

Local fire departments need Congress’ help for switch to PFAS-free foam and gear

Firefighters are among those most highly exposed to harms from the toxic “forever chemicals” known as PFAS through their protective gear and firefighting foam, but many local fire departments lack the resources to switch to PFAS-free alternatives. More:

Firefighters Exposure to PFAS Alternatives to PFAS Community right to know
08/09/2021 -

The California State Legislature approved Assembly Bill 1200, which would ban the toxic “forever chemicals” known as PFAS from paper, paperboard or plant-based food packaging, utensils and paper straws starting January 1, 2023. The Bill also requires labeling of cookware containing toxic chemicals. More:

PFAS Human Health Effects

California lawmakers approve bill to ban toxic ‘forever chemicals’ in food packaging and straws

The California State Legislature approved Assembly Bill 1200, which would ban the toxic “forever chemicals” known as PFAS from paper, paperboard or plant-based food packaging, utensils and paper straws starting January 1, 2023. The Bill also requires labeling of cookware containing toxic chemicals. More:

PFAS Human Health Effects
08/09/2021 -

A well in the Bayfield subdivision on the outskirts of Fayetteville has tested positive for one type of forever chemical known as PMPA. At least two other nearby wells are also tainted, and more well testing is coming. Chemours is providing bottled water to the homes - and filtration systems at some point - as required by a consent order. More:

Enforcement measures

Wells polluted with PFAS found 18 miles from Chemours chemical plant

A well in the Bayfield subdivision on the outskirts of Fayetteville has tested positive for one type of forever chemical known as PMPA. At least two other nearby wells are also tainted, and more well testing is coming. Chemours is providing bottled water to the homes - and filtration systems at some point - as required by a consent order. More:

Enforcement measures
03/09/2021 -

The EU has decided to ban 200 PFAS substances in phases, starting February 2023. This is the first time the EU has imposed a ban on several chemicals of similar structure and properties all at once, which hopefully paves the way for more group bans. More:


EU puts 200 PFAS out of business – but thousands remain

The EU has decided to ban 200 PFAS substances in phases, starting February 2023. This is the first time the EU has imposed a ban on several chemicals of similar structure and properties all at once, which hopefully paves the way for more group bans. More:

01/09/2021 -

Gigoo-Aakoosi: Fish Is Sick tells the story of the Asubpeeschoseewagong Netum Anishinabek, also known as Grassy Narrows First Nation, and Wabauskang First Nation and the historical and ongoing devastation endured by those living with water contamination. More:

Dioxins and related compounds Toxicity and Human Health Effects Dioxin and Pulp and Paper Manufacture

How an Ontario paper mill poisoned nearby First Nations

Gigoo-Aakoosi: Fish Is Sick tells the story of the Asubpeeschoseewagong Netum Anishinabek, also known as Grassy Narrows First Nation, and Wabauskang First Nation and the historical and ongoing devastation endured by those living with water contamination. More:

Dioxins and related compounds Toxicity and Human Health Effects Dioxin and Pulp and Paper Manufacture
31/08/2021 -

Researchers tested indoor air at 20 sites and detected the “forever chemicals” in 17 locations. The airborne compounds are thought to break off of PFAS-treated products such as carpeting and clothing and attach to dust or freely float through the indoor environment. More:


Toxic ‘forever chemicals’ contaminate indoor air at worrying levels, study finds

Researchers tested indoor air at 20 sites and detected the “forever chemicals” in 17 locations. The airborne compounds are thought to break off of PFAS-treated products such as carpeting and clothing and attach to dust or freely float through the indoor environment. More:

31/08/2021 -

The chemicals have seeped into the Great Lakes, adversely affecting wildlife, and potentially harming residents’ food supply and livelihoods if they consume fish contaminated with the chemicals. The contamination underscores the need for swift PFAS cleanup by DOD, which used these chemicals in firefighting foams for decades and knew of their harms. More:

PFAS contamination research in the Great Lakes PFAS testing methods in water and food PFAS in food: Risk assessment and Consumption guidelines 

‘Forever chemicals’ contamination at Defense Department sites threatens Great Lakes fish and residents

The chemicals have seeped into the Great Lakes, adversely affecting wildlife, and potentially harming residents’ food supply and livelihoods if they consume fish contaminated with the chemicals. The contamination underscores the need for swift PFAS cleanup by DOD, which used these chemicals in firefighting foams for decades and knew of their harms. More:

PFAS contamination research in the Great Lakes PFAS testing methods in water and food PFAS in food: Risk assessment and Consumption guidelines 
30/08/2021 -

David Harris grew up on a farm next door to the Naval Research Laboratory – Chesapeake Bay Detachment. He recalls camping with his scout troop on the 168-acre base overlooking the Bay and drinking water from the small stream that flows from the Navy property onto his family’s farm. More:

Regulation of PFAS in drinking water

‘Forever chemicals’ from Navy lab flowing into the Chesapeake Bay

David Harris grew up on a farm next door to the Naval Research Laboratory – Chesapeake Bay Detachment. He recalls camping with his scout troop on the 168-acre base overlooking the Bay and drinking water from the small stream that flows from the Navy property onto his family’s farm. More:

Regulation of PFAS in drinking water
30/08/2021 -

As U.S. forces withdrew from Afghanistan, the Taliban immediately rushed in, and it recently took over the country’s major cities in just a few days. The end of the two-decade American occupation has not only produced a fraught political situation; it has also created an environmental one. Some of the military bases the U.S. handed over to the Afghan national security forces—which this month stood down rather than continuing to contest a seemingly inevitable Taliban victory—hold toxic detritus that may never get a full cleanup. More:

Military open-air burn pits Military use of firefighting foam chemicals

U.S. Forces Are Leaving a Toxic Environmental Legacy in Afghanistan

As U.S. forces withdrew from Afghanistan, the Taliban immediately rushed in, and it recently took over the country’s major cities in just a few days. The end of the two-decade American occupation has not only produced a fraught political situation; it has also created an environmental one. Some of the military bases the U.S. handed over to the Afghan national security forces—which this month stood down rather than continuing to contest a seemingly inevitable Taliban victory—hold toxic detritus that may never get a full cleanup. More:

Military open-air burn pits Military use of firefighting foam chemicals
26/08/2021 -

The Department of Defense records reveal PFAS levels at the 59 installations ranging from 3.4 parts per trillion, or ppt, to 870,000 ppt in the bases’ soil and water. There are no federal limits on PFAS in soil or water, but some states have moved to limit the most ubiquitous type of PFAS in drinking water to levels as low as 6 ppt in order to adequately protect human health. More:

PFAS Health Effects US PFAS Legislation PFAS Contamination at Military Sites

‘Forever chemicals’ contamination found at 59 more Defense Department sites

The Department of Defense records reveal PFAS levels at the 59 installations ranging from 3.4 parts per trillion, or ppt, to 870,000 ppt in the bases’ soil and water. There are no federal limits on PFAS in soil or water, but some states have moved to limit the most ubiquitous type of PFAS in drinking water to levels as low as 6 ppt in order to adequately protect human health. More:

PFAS Health Effects US PFAS Legislation PFAS Contamination at Military Sites
18/08/2021 -

The eggs of chickens that range freely in places where plastic is incinerated have extremely high levels of dioxins. The norms that prevail in Europe are dramatically exceeded in low-income countries. Researchers analysed chicken eggs for dioxins, PCBs, and some other persistent organic toxins (Persistent Organic Pollutants, POPs). They argue for a complete ban on the export of plastic waste. More:


Dioxin in eggs from burning plastic

The eggs of chickens that range freely in places where plastic is incinerated have extremely high levels of dioxins. The norms that prevail in Europe are dramatically exceeded in low-income countries. Researchers analysed chicken eggs for dioxins, PCBs, and some other persistent organic toxins (Persistent Organic Pollutants, POPs). They argue for a complete ban on the export of plastic waste. More:

16/08/2021 -

High levels of PFAS chemicals have contaminated a plastics recycling company in Henderson, Kentucky, spreading through the air and water and likely contaminating a creek that flows into the Ohio River, state officials say. More:


‘Concerning’ Levels Of Forever Chemicals Polluting Henderson

High levels of PFAS chemicals have contaminated a plastics recycling company in Henderson, Kentucky, spreading through the air and water and likely contaminating a creek that flows into the Ohio River, state officials say. More:

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