POPs in the news

17/09/2015 -

A study investigated how concentrations of POPs in breast milk vary worldwide by reviewing studies published between 1995 and 2011. They found that levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dioxins in breast milk are higher in Europe and North America, whereas pesticides are more prevalent in Africa and Asia. More:
Science for Environment Policy
Spatial and temporal trends of the Stockholm Convention POPs in mothers’ milk — a global review (Research article)


Global variation in persistent organic pollutants in breast milk

A study investigated how concentrations of POPs in breast milk vary worldwide by reviewing studies published between 1995 and 2011. They found that levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dioxins in breast milk are higher in Europe and North America, whereas pesticides are more prevalent in Africa and Asia. More:
Science for Environment Policy
Spatial and temporal trends of the Stockholm Convention POPs in mothers’ milk — a global review (Research article)

14/09/2015 -

Pesticide use in homes may increase the risk of children developing leukemia or lymphoma, a new report suggests. Researchers combined data from 16 earlier studies that had compared pesticide exposure between children who developed leukemia or lymphoma and those who did not. More:
CNN
Residential Exposure to Pesticide During Childhood and Childhood Cancers: A Meta-Analysis (Research article)


Report: Pesticide exposure linked to childhood cancer and lower IQ

Pesticide use in homes may increase the risk of children developing leukemia or lymphoma, a new report suggests. Researchers combined data from 16 earlier studies that had compared pesticide exposure between children who developed leukemia or lymphoma and those who did not. More:
CNN
Residential Exposure to Pesticide During Childhood and Childhood Cancers: A Meta-Analysis (Research article)

03/09/2015 -

Chemistry is having “an innovation crisis”, according to John Warner, co-author of the 12 Principles of Green Chemistry. “We need to ask if the way we’re training future scientists is fitting the need of society.” “Instead of enacting another law that bans or regulates a chemical or a molecule that has a toxic or environmentally destructive effect, we need to think about how we invent a product that doesn’t have that effect”, he said. More:
The Guardian


In the future, the best chemistry practices will be green

Chemistry is having “an innovation crisis”, according to John Warner, co-author of the 12 Principles of Green Chemistry. “We need to ask if the way we’re training future scientists is fitting the need of society.” “Instead of enacting another law that bans or regulates a chemical or a molecule that has a toxic or environmentally destructive effect, we need to think about how we invent a product that doesn’t have that effect”, he said. More:
The Guardian

01/09/2015 -

A mosquito net that binds insecticides with electrostatic forces could be a significant step towards eradicating tropical diseases like malaria and dengue. The net is claimed to be up to ten times more effective at killing insecticide-resistant mosquitos, and works even when the insects land for just a few seconds. More:
Chemistry World


Electrostatic net kills resistant mosquitoes

A mosquito net that binds insecticides with electrostatic forces could be a significant step towards eradicating tropical diseases like malaria and dengue. The net is claimed to be up to ten times more effective at killing insecticide-resistant mosquitos, and works even when the insects land for just a few seconds. More:
Chemistry World

22/08/2015 -

The “exposome” is defined as “the totality of human environmental exposures from conception onward, complementing the genome”. This research study describes the correlation structure of the exposome during pregnancy to better understand the relationships between families of exposure and to develop analytical tools for exposome data. More:
Environmental Science and Technology (Research article)


The Pregnancy Exposome: Multiple Environmental Exposures in a Birth Cohort

The “exposome” is defined as “the totality of human environmental exposures from conception onward, complementing the genome”. This research study describes the correlation structure of the exposome during pregnancy to better understand the relationships between families of exposure and to develop analytical tools for exposome data. More:
Environmental Science and Technology (Research article)

20/08/2015 -

A toxic chemical long used to make non-stick or water-repellent coatings may be more dangerous than believed. Perfluorooctanoic acid, or PFOA, was used to make DuPont's popular Teflon coating for decades. DuPont phased out its production after a 2006 settlement with federal regulators, who had linked it to birth defects and cancer in animals. More:
Vice News
Teflon Chemical Unsafe at Smallest Doses (Report)


The Chemical Long Used in Non-Stick Pans Might Be Unsafe at Any Level

A toxic chemical long used to make non-stick or water-repellent coatings may be more dangerous than believed. Perfluorooctanoic acid, or PFOA, was used to make DuPont's popular Teflon coating for decades. DuPont phased out its production after a 2006 settlement with federal regulators, who had linked it to birth defects and cancer in animals. More:
Vice News
Teflon Chemical Unsafe at Smallest Doses (Report)

20/08/2015 -

In essence, General Electric sampled the fish incorrectly, in a way that created wide variations in the amount of tissue tested per fish. That can lead to wide variations in PCB levels. More:
PostStar.com


GE incorrectly sampled PCB-laden fish for a decade

In essence, General Electric sampled the fish incorrectly, in a way that created wide variations in the amount of tissue tested per fish. That can lead to wide variations in PCB levels. More:
PostStar.com

20/08/2015 -

The study is the first to estimate the transfer of water- and stain-proofing chemicals from mother to baby during breastfeeding and suggests that the mother’s milk—which provides healthy antibodies, vitamins and nutrients— is also a major source of these harmful compounds for the developing children. More:
Environmental Health News
Breastfeeding as an Exposure Pathway for Perfluorinated Alkylates (Research article)
The Madrid Statement on Poly- and Perfluoroalkyl Substances (PFASs)


Breastfeeding exposes babies to water- and stain-proofing chemicals

The study is the first to estimate the transfer of water- and stain-proofing chemicals from mother to baby during breastfeeding and suggests that the mother’s milk—which provides healthy antibodies, vitamins and nutrients— is also a major source of these harmful compounds for the developing children. More:
Environmental Health News
Breastfeeding as an Exposure Pathway for Perfluorinated Alkylates (Research article)
The Madrid Statement on Poly- and Perfluoroalkyl Substances (PFASs)

19/08/2015 -

The market has spoken: In addition to regulatory drivers, green chemistry innovation has been spurred in recent years by both growing consumer awareness and the procurement policies of big retailers. More:
The Guardian


What will it take for brands to deliver on the promise of greener chemicals?

The market has spoken: In addition to regulatory drivers, green chemistry innovation has been spurred in recent years by both growing consumer awareness and the procurement policies of big retailers. More:
The Guardian

17/08/2015 -

Until recently few people had heard much about chemicals like C8. One of tens of thousands of unregulated industrial chemicals, perfluorooctanoic acid, or PFOA — also called C8 because of the eight-carbon chain that makes up its chemical backbone — had gone unnoticed for most of its eight or so decades on earth. PFOA was slippery, chemically stable, and a critical ingredient in the manufacture of hundreds of products, including Teflon. More:
The Intercept


The Teflon Toxin

Until recently few people had heard much about chemicals like C8. One of tens of thousands of unregulated industrial chemicals, perfluorooctanoic acid, or PFOA — also called C8 because of the eight-carbon chain that makes up its chemical backbone — had gone unnoticed for most of its eight or so decades on earth. PFOA was slippery, chemically stable, and a critical ingredient in the manufacture of hundreds of products, including Teflon. More:
The Intercept

04/08/2015 -

New genetic science shows that children can be affected by their parents’ exposure to common environmental chemicals. When parents are exposed to chemicals, they can influence epigenetics, or the cues that turn genes on and off. These patterns can later influence how genes are passed on to offspring. More:
www.healthline.com
Life-Long Implications of Developmental Exposure to Environmental Stressors: New Perspectives (Research article)


Even Before Conception, Parents’ Exposure to Common Chemicals Can Affect Baby

New genetic science shows that children can be affected by their parents’ exposure to common environmental chemicals. When parents are exposed to chemicals, they can influence epigenetics, or the cues that turn genes on and off. These patterns can later influence how genes are passed on to offspring. More:
www.healthline.com
Life-Long Implications of Developmental Exposure to Environmental Stressors: New Perspectives (Research article)

01/08/2015 -

More than 36 years after being banned, PCBs continue to pollute ecosystems, according to a study released in the journal PLoS One. They pose a particular challenge to the survival of marine mammals like porpoises, whales, and dolphins. More:
Pacific Standard Magazine


PCBs Were Banned Three Decades Ago, but They’re Still Hurting Marine Mammals

More than 36 years after being banned, PCBs continue to pollute ecosystems, according to a study released in the journal PLoS One. They pose a particular challenge to the survival of marine mammals like porpoises, whales, and dolphins. More:
Pacific Standard Magazine

27/07/2015 -

Palm wine remains a much-loved local drink for many Ghanaians. It commands a very large constituency despite competition from local and foreign beverages. With or without adverts, lovers of “palmi”- young and old, know where to find the sweet, whitish smooth beverage enjoyed mostly in calabashes. However, the abuse of agro-chemicals in tapping the wine is gradually making its consumption unsafe. More:
Ghana Business News


Poison in the calabash

Palm wine remains a much-loved local drink for many Ghanaians. It commands a very large constituency despite competition from local and foreign beverages. With or without adverts, lovers of “palmi”- young and old, know where to find the sweet, whitish smooth beverage enjoyed mostly in calabashes. However, the abuse of agro-chemicals in tapping the wine is gradually making its consumption unsafe. More:
Ghana Business News

26/07/2015 -

It may seem harmless. There are bugs on a plant in a private garden and the owner sprays a pesticide on that one spot. But what happens if the chemicals get in the soil or a honeybee lands on the flower? More:
Metro Weast Daily News - USA


Local farmers: education needed regarding pesticides

It may seem harmless. There are bugs on a plant in a private garden and the owner sprays a pesticide on that one spot. But what happens if the chemicals get in the soil or a honeybee lands on the flower? More:
Metro Weast Daily News - USA

01/07/2015 -

New lines of research suggest that chronic dietary exposure to POPs may also contribute to obesity and type 2 diabetes.2 In this issue of EHP, researchers examine how one POP in particular—2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF)—affects the composition of the mouse gut microbiome.3 They report that TCDF exposure alters the gut microbiome in ways that may prove to contribute to obesity and other metabolic diseases. More:
Environmental Health Perspectives
POPs Modify Gut Microbiota–Host Metabolic Homeostasis in Mice (Research article)


POPs and Gut Microbiota: Dietary Exposure Alters Ratio of Bacterial Species

New lines of research suggest that chronic dietary exposure to POPs may also contribute to obesity and type 2 diabetes.2 In this issue of EHP, researchers examine how one POP in particular—2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF)—affects the composition of the mouse gut microbiome.3 They report that TCDF exposure alters the gut microbiome in ways that may prove to contribute to obesity and other metabolic diseases. More:
Environmental Health Perspectives
POPs Modify Gut Microbiota–Host Metabolic Homeostasis in Mice (Research article)

01/07/2015 -

Lots of chemicals are considered safe in low doses. But what happens when you ingest a little bit of a lot of different chemicals over time? In some cases, these combinations may conspire to increase your risk of cancer, according to a new report. More:
Los Angeles Times


Combinations of 'safe' chemicals may increase cancer risk, study suggests

Lots of chemicals are considered safe in low doses. But what happens when you ingest a little bit of a lot of different chemicals over time? In some cases, these combinations may conspire to increase your risk of cancer, according to a new report. More:
Los Angeles Times

23/06/2015 -

A compound found in fruit could be the safe insect repellent of the future, according to a group of scientists from the University of California, Riverside in the US. More:
ChemistryWorld


Fruity alternative to toxic insecticides

A compound found in fruit could be the safe insect repellent of the future, according to a group of scientists from the University of California, Riverside in the US. More:
ChemistryWorld

23/06/2015 -

A global taskforce of 174 scientists from leading research centers across 28 countries studied the link between mixtures of commonly encountered chemicals and the development of cancer. The study selected 85 chemicals not considered carcinogenic to humans and found 50 supported key cancer-related mechanisms at exposures found in the environment today. More:
ScienceDaily


Cocktail of common chemicals may trigger cancer

A global taskforce of 174 scientists from leading research centers across 28 countries studied the link between mixtures of commonly encountered chemicals and the development of cancer. The study selected 85 chemicals not considered carcinogenic to humans and found 50 supported key cancer-related mechanisms at exposures found in the environment today. More:
ScienceDaily

23/06/2015 -

In a review of various agricultural chemicals, IARC's specialist panel said it had decided to classify lindane as "carcinogenic to humans" in its Group 1 category, DDT as "probably carcinogenic to humans" in its Group 2A class, and the herbicide 2,4-D as "possibly carcinogenic to humans" in its Group 2B. More:
REUTERS
See also: Press Release - International Agency for Research on Cancer
                  Carcinogenicity of lindane, DDT, and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid - The Lancet Oncology


WHO agency says insecticides lindane and DDT linked to cancer

In a review of various agricultural chemicals, IARC's specialist panel said it had decided to classify lindane as "carcinogenic to humans" in its Group 1 category, DDT as "probably carcinogenic to humans" in its Group 2A class, and the herbicide 2,4-D as "possibly carcinogenic to humans" in its Group 2B. More:
REUTERS
See also: Press Release - International Agency for Research on Cancer
                  Carcinogenicity of lindane, DDT, and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid - The Lancet Oncology

17/06/2015 -

A new study published Tuesday in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism found a startling link between pregnant women exposed to DDT and the breast cancer risk to their daughters. More:
The Washington Post
See also: DDT Linked to Fourfold Increase in Breast Cancer Risk - National Geographic


Startling link between pregnant mother’s exposure to DDT and daughter’s risk of breast cancer

A new study published Tuesday in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism found a startling link between pregnant women exposed to DDT and the breast cancer risk to their daughters. More:
The Washington Post
See also: DDT Linked to Fourfold Increase in Breast Cancer Risk - National Geographic

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